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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Kai Engel, Voletka Dirlea, Stephen Dyer and Jochen Graff

This article reports on the findings of the Best Innovator competition, which was launched in Germany in 2003, to identify and communicate the best practices of innovation…

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1400

Abstract

Purpose

This article reports on the findings of the Best Innovator competition, which was launched in Germany in 2003, to identify and communicate the best practices of innovation management of the country’s businesses. After ten years of research, the contest has not only been expanded to identify the most innovative companies in much of the developed world but also to document the success of their best practices over time.

Design/methodology/approach

This article details five tested sets of best practices.

Findings

A major research finding is the strong correlation between superior innovation management capabilities and sustainable, profitable growth. Another finding was that, given the mix of industries, the diversity of businesses and the range of sizes in the Best Innovator club, it is striking that there is no correlation between R&D budget and innovation.

Practical implications

Best Innovators first develop and then manage their innovation portfolios. All of them pursue clarity on a fundamental question: what do we want our innovation strategy to do for us?

Originality/value

The researchers found that to get their innovation strategies right, Best Innovators invest upfront in understanding market, technology and service dynamics. They are investing time more than money. Leaders can learn how Best Innovators address innovation management “from the market to the market” and manipulate five areas to improve their innovation performance and propel sustainable and profitable growth.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Kai Engel, Voletka Dirlea, Stephen Dyer and Jochen Graff

– The authors have collected key insights from the Best Innovator competition, launched in 2003. Six early-stage practices are critical.

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507

Abstract

Purpose

The authors have collected key insights from the Best Innovator competition, launched in 2003. Six early-stage practices are critical.

Design/methodology/approach

The Best Innovator competition, annual benchmarking against the best in innovation management, focuses on the how-to of innovation and examines what leading companies are doing to achieve better yield with their innovation strategies.

Findings

By studying the competition winners, the researchers found a strong correlation between specific innovation management practices and sustainable, profitable growth.

Practical implications

Best Innovators establish explicit expectations for making the business case for innovation. They name a specific set of deliverables to which they are committed.

Originality/value

The article offers specific guidelines for setting the stage for continuous innovation that results in profitable offerings and services.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Robert M. Randall

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93

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Robert Randall

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132

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Catherine Gorrell

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145

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership , vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Catherine Gorrell

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134

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

H.G.A. Hughes

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123

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Markus Wohlfeil, Anthony Patterson and Stephen J. Gould

This paper aims to explain a celebrity’s deep resonance with consumers by unpacking the individual constituents of a celebrity’s polysemic appeal. While celebrities are…

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2563

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain a celebrity’s deep resonance with consumers by unpacking the individual constituents of a celebrity’s polysemic appeal. While celebrities are traditionally theorised as unidimensional semiotic receptacles of cultural meaning, the authors conceptualise them here instead as human beings/performers with a multi-constitutional, polysemic consumer appeal.

Design/methodology/approach

Supporting evidence is drawn from autoethnographic data collected over a total period of 25 months and structured through a hermeneutic analysis.

Findings

In rehumanising the celebrity, the study finds that each celebrity offers the individual consumer a unique and very personal parasocial appeal as the performer, the private person behind the public performer, the tangible manifestation of either through products and the social link to other consumers. The stronger these constituents, individually or symbiotically, appeal to the consumer’s personal desires, the more s/he feels emotionally attached to this particular celebrity.

Research limitations/implications

Although using autoethnography means that the breadth of collected data is limited, the depth of insight this approach garners sufficiently unpacks the polysemic appeal of celebrities to consumers.

Practical implications

The findings encourage talent agents, publicists and marketing managers to reconsider underlying assumptions in their talent management and/or celebrity endorsement practices.

Originality/value

While prior research on celebrity appeal has tended to enshrine celebrities in a “dehumanised” structuralist semiosis, which erases the very idea of individualised consumer meanings, this paper reveals the multi-constitutional polysemy of any particular celebrity’s personal appeal as a performer and human being to any particular consumer.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Stephen L. Jones, Stanley E. Fawcett, Amydee M. Fawcett and Cynthia Wallin

Trust is a vital ingredient in modern supply chain (SC) alliances. Yet, most measures of trust are rather simplistic. This paper aims to review the trust literature to…

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1596

Abstract

Purpose

Trust is a vital ingredient in modern supply chain (SC) alliances. Yet, most measures of trust are rather simplistic. This paper aims to review the trust literature to identify the different facets of SC trust. A multi‐faceted measure of trust is then developed and used to benchmark the extent to which trust signals are used in alliance management.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi‐method: 50 preliminary interviews were conducted and 189 surveys were collected.

Findings

Benchmarking buyers' trust‐building strategies reveals that most companies lack the know‐how and ability to develop high levels of trust. Most companies have implemented strategies to signal their performance capability, leading to a level of transactional trust. However, few companies have recognized the need to signal to their SC partners their commitment to the relationship – leaving them without the ability to establish the trust levels needed to drive breakthrough collaboration.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the importance of signaling trustworthiness in a SC context. It develops relationship commitment as an important dimension of trust, and explains the trust cycle within the context of an exchange cycle. It also takes steps toward developing a more robust and meaningful measure of SC trust.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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