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Article

Stephen Chappell and Annie Thackeray

The library of the Arts Council of Great Britain holds material on arts management, cultural policy and the arts economy. It is available to staff, clients and researchers…

Abstract

The library of the Arts Council of Great Britain holds material on arts management, cultural policy and the arts economy. It is available to staff, clients and researchers doing work on arts policy and funding. There are about 10,000 books and the following services are offered:

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Program, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Abstract

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Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Stephen Hackett

Looks initially at the theoretical foundations of both competency‐based training (CBT) and reflective practice, then at current approaches to CBT and reflective practice…

Abstract

Looks initially at the theoretical foundations of both competency‐based training (CBT) and reflective practice, then at current approaches to CBT and reflective practice. The compatibility of these two in educational practice, and the extent to which they might be combined in an educational or training context is discussed. CBT and reflective practice are not regarded as having a mutual equivalence in adult education and training. Rather, it is argued that they constitute two approaches within this educational field which function at different levels of teaching and learning and, as such, there exists at least the potential for them to be designed and developed so as to be complementary.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Tamar Fischer, Lisa Van Reemst and Jessica De Jong

The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent job, organizational, and personal characteristics independently contribute to the prediction of workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent job, organizational, and personal characteristics independently contribute to the prediction of workplace victimization of local government employees in the Netherlands. The existence of interactions between personal and context (job and organizational) characteristics is also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured survey data measured the frequency of victimization involving three types of incidents: verbal aggression; threats; and physical violence. Associations with job and personal factors and interaction effects were studied using bivariate and multivariate analyses.

Findings

Contact frequency, perceived work stress, and type of job held by local government employees are the strongest correlates of workplace aggression. Self-efficacy in employees’ conflict management skills shows an unexpected positive association with the level of experienced aggression, especially in organizations that have low levels of prevention measures.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the cross-sectional design of the study, no definite causal conclusions can be drawn. Common-method bias in the measurements may have led to systematic bias.

Originality/value

This study presents an integrated model of correlates of public-initiated workplace aggression toward a population that is understudied: namely, local government employees. It also provides first insights into how job, organizational, and personal correlates of workplace victimization interact in this population.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article

The completion of our first volume affords us an opportunity of thanking our readers and subscribers for their substantial support, which has made possible the continuance…

Abstract

The completion of our first volume affords us an opportunity of thanking our readers and subscribers for their substantial support, which has made possible the continuance of a library magazine on purely technical lines. The amount of sympathy and response received has demonstrated in an unmistakable manner that the practical side of librarianship is considered sufficiently interesting to require a special journal for its exposition.

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New Library World, vol. 1 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous…

Abstract

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous updating basis rather than as a monthly routine affair.

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Managerial Law, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article

Elsewhere in this issue details are given of the requirements of the Meat Products Order, 1952. Certain minimum meat contents have been increased with effect from March…

Abstract

Elsewhere in this issue details are given of the requirements of the Meat Products Order, 1952. Certain minimum meat contents have been increased with effect from March 16th last, without the issue of any prior warning, and at the time of writing, twenty days after the Order came into force, the Public Analyst has received no official notification of the changes. This type of ill‐considered arbitrary action by the Ministry of Food can only breed distrust amongst those whose duty lies in complying with or enforcing whatever the Ministry decrees.

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British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Fraya Wagner‐Marsh and James Conley

Alvin Toffler foretold the technological “third wave”, in 1980. We suggest that there is an organizational fourth wave, the spiritually‐based firm. The movement toward…

Abstract

Alvin Toffler foretold the technological “third wave”, in 1980. We suggest that there is an organizational fourth wave, the spiritually‐based firm. The movement toward spiritualizing the organization has apparently caught on and a number of highly diverse firms are attempting to instill a spiritual corporate culture. The intent of this paper is to explore basic attitudes and practices that appear to be essential for success in maintaining a spiritual corporate culture. Six key concepts have been selected based on our review of the literature, professional observations, and in‐depth personal interviews with leaders of spiritually‐based firms: honesty with self, articulation of the corporation’s spiritually‐based philosophy, mutual trust and honesty with others, commitment to quality and service, commitment to employees, and selection of personnel to match the corporation’s spiritually‐based philosophy. As these key concepts are discussed, specific examples of how these concepts are practiced within various firms are included.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part

Jennifer A. Hartfield, Derek M. Griffith and Marino A. Bruce

There are racial differences in policing and treatment when people are stopped for the same crimes, and scholars have long documented and expressed concern regarding the…

Abstract

There are racial differences in policing and treatment when people are stopped for the same crimes, and scholars have long documented and expressed concern regarding the police’s reactions to Black men. In this paper, we argue that racism is the root cause of police-involved killings of unarmed Black men. Utilizing several contemporary examples, we articulate the ways racism operates through cultural forces and institutional mechanisms to illustrate how this phenomenon lies at the intersection of public safety and public health. Thus, we begin by defining racism and describing how it is gendered to move the notion that the victims of police involved shootings overwhelmingly tend to be Black men from the margins of the explanation of the patterns to the center. Next, we discuss how the police have been used to promote public safety and public health throughout US history. We conclude by describing common explanations for contemporary police-involved shootings of unarmed Black males and why those arguments are flawed. Reframing the phenomena as gendered racism is critical for identifying points of intervention. Because neither intent nor purpose is a prerequisite of the ways that racism affects public safety and public health, the differential impact of policies and programs along racial lines is sufficient for racism to be a useful way to frame this pattern of outcomes. Incorporating gender into this framing of racism introduces that ways that Black men have been viewed, stereotyped, and treated implicitly in institutional practices and explicitly in institutional policies.

Details

Inequality, Crime, and Health Among African American Males
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-051-0

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