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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Stephen Burke

This paper aims to review how intergenerational connections and relationships have been affected to date by COVID-19. It provides lessons for the future.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review how intergenerational connections and relationships have been affected to date by COVID-19. It provides lessons for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a review of policy and practice.

Findings

Although there are some excellent examples of creative approaches such as online strategies to bring generations together in the face of social distancing, there remain barriers to building stronger communities. Many people of all ages remain lonely and isolated. Community projects are under-funded and will struggle to maintain connections beyond the immediate crisis. Inequalities and the digital divide have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Intergenerational relations are likely to be further strained by the economic impact.

Originality/value

None of us have known anything like COVID-19 and its impact on all aspects of our lives. It will continue to affect generations to come, and we need to learn the lessons as we move forward.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Rikard Sundling, Stefan Olander, Petter Wallentén, Stephen Burke, Ricardo Bernardo and Åke Blomsterberg

The purpose of this paper is to identify appropriate concepts of multi-active façades for the renovation of multifamily buildings in Sweden and to determine which, if any…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify appropriate concepts of multi-active façades for the renovation of multifamily buildings in Sweden and to determine which, if any, are financially viable.

Design/methodology/approach

A lifecycle profit (LCP) analysis was used to examine financial viability through a ten-step process, which included identifying concepts, assessing costs and prices, calculating the LCP and performing sensitivity analysis. Two existing buildings – one low rise and the other high rise – were used as reference models.

Findings

The findings were contradictory. Implementing any of the multi-active façade concepts on the high-rise building would be financially beneficial. The opposite was, however, the case for the low-rise building. Two factors causing this contradiction have been identified: the façade material before renovation and the size of the building.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to two case buildings situated in Sweden; however, similar buildings represent a significant amount of the existing building stock. Part of the purpose of the study is also to investigate the merits of LCP analysis to evaluate energy-efficient retrofitting. The study implicates the benefits and pitfalls of LCP analysis needed to be considered by researchers and practitioners alike.

Originality/value

The research findings contribute to the understanding of energy-efficient retrofitting of existing multifamily buildings based on prefabricated multi-active façade concepts.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Muhammad Bilal Farooq and Charl de Villiers

The aims of this study are to review the literature examining the arguments for and against the telephonic qualitative research interviews, to develop criteria for…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study are to review the literature examining the arguments for and against the telephonic qualitative research interviews, to develop criteria for assessing when the use of the telephone is suitable in qualitative research and if suitable to offer detailed strategies for the effective use of this data collection instrument.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a thematic analysis of the literature, informed by the researchers’ experiences using the telephone, computer-based audio and face-to-face interviews for an accounting research project involving 50 semi-structured interviews with managers.

Findings

The study identifies five criteria to determine the suitability of using the telephone in qualitative research interviews. In addition, the study offers a set of detailed strategies on what to do before, during and after a telephonic qualitative research interview.

Research limitations/implications

The study can assist qualitative researchers in deciding when to use the telephone and how to use it effectively.

Originality/value

The study builds on the limited prior research and provides a more complete list of strategies on the effective use of the telephone in qualitative social sciences research. These strategies are a synthesis of existing studies and observations drawn from the author's study, which examines the work of organisational managers. In comparison, prior studies have been based on research projects that explored sensitive personal issues and emotive experiences not always related to managerial work.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Stephen Burke

Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Stephen Burke

This paper sets out to look at the different types of crawl spaces that are found in Sweden and why they are still being used in today's constructions despite the advice…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to look at the different types of crawl spaces that are found in Sweden and why they are still being used in today's constructions despite the advice of building experts to avoid their use.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature reviews were performed to look at the types of crawl space foundations available as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each type and to look at the economic costs associated with repairing a damaged home that could be attributed to a crawl space foundation. Interviews were conducted with engineers with regard to moisture design issues in the Swedish building industry.

Findings

This study shows that there are five traditional types of crawl spaces used in Sweden: plinth, outdoor ventilated, indoor ventilated, unventilated, and suspended crawl space foundations, four of which are currently available to builders. Despite all of the available knowledge regarding the disadvantages and the past performance of the outdoor ventilated crawl spaces, companies in Sweden are still using this design and are still experiencing expensive problems.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to Sweden. The situation in other countries was not specifically examined; however, it appears that other countries are also facing the same problems and this paper may provide some insight into why.

Originality/value

This study shows that there are many ways to construct a crawl space, some of which are considerably less risky than others. The study also indicates that the building industry in general seems to lack the theoretical background or incentive to utilize these variations properly or completely move away from these designs.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Stephen Burke

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Peter Stephen and Maria E. Burke

Students at Manchester Metropolitan University School of Libraryand Information Studies are required to submit a career developmentreport, analysing their own aims and…

Abstract

Students at Manchester Metropolitan University School of Library and Information Studies are required to submit a career development report, analysing their own aims and aptitudes for their future careers. While an independent exercise, this report also helps to prepare students for their eventual preparation of a Professional Development Report for the Library Association. Discusses the aims and objectives and operation of the report and considers its initial implementation.

Details

Library Review, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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