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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb014704. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb014704. When citing the article, please cite: C. John Langley, Jr., David P. Carlisle, Stephen B. Probst, Donald F. Biggs, Roy E. Cail, (1988), “Microcomputers as a Logistics Information Strategy”, International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, Vol. 18 Iss: 6, pp. 11 - 17.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

C. John Langley, David P. Carlisle, Stephen B. Probst, Donald F. Biggs and Roy E. Cail

Study teams, including industry representatives, themselves experienced in the use of microcomputers in logistics, report on a survey of such use.

Abstract

Study teams, including industry representatives, themselves experienced in the use of microcomputers in logistics, report on a survey of such use.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2015

Gregory Bott

Through an inductive approach, I examine the process in which autonomy is exercised in the board-executive director relationship. A further contribution of the current…

Abstract

Purpose

Through an inductive approach, I examine the process in which autonomy is exercised in the board-executive director relationship. A further contribution of the current study is the exploration of the antecedents of the delegation process.

Methodology/approach

Utilizing the benefits of semi-structured critical incident interviews, and analysis of organizational documentation, I study the process in which autonomy is exercised in the board-executive director relationship.

Findings

Evidence is found within organizations of times when it is clear that board members understand that there are boundaries to their role, respecting this autonomy, and times when board members overstep their role. Next, in the current study, I explore the antecedents of the delegation process, including identification of role boundaries, role clarity, clear expectations, trust in the executive director, and trust in the governance control systems.

Research implications

Autonomy has historically been examined within seemingly paradoxical frameworks; this has included investigating autonomy as part of the definition of laissez faire leadership, as a key feature of transformational leadership and as one component of the jobs characteristics model, while others have characterized it as a stream of shared leadership. In the current project, the process of providing autonomy takes on characteristics consistent with both vertical leadership and distributed leadership. The executive director similarly plays a role in maintaining previously defined role boundaries, which is evidence of bidirectional influence. However, the board plays a disproportionately larger role in delineating and maintaining role boundaries – characteristics I demonstrate as being consistent with transformational leadership.

Originality/value

In this chapter, I provide a refreshing divergence from typical board prescriptions, in that I examine the board-executive director relationship through a behavioural lens. A clear understanding of the mutual influence and antecedents of autonomy are important to practitioners seeking to enhance performance through the delineation of roles.

Details

Contingency, Behavioural and Evolutionary Perspectives on Public and Nonprofit Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-429-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Ute-Christine Klehe, Jelena Zikic, Annelies E.M. van Vianen, Jessie Koen and Maximilian Buyken

Economic stressors such as job insecurity, job loss, unemployment, and underemployment cause severe difficulties for the workers affected, their families, organizations…

Abstract

Economic stressors such as job insecurity, job loss, unemployment, and underemployment cause severe difficulties for the workers affected, their families, organizations, and societies overall. Consequently, most past research has taken a thoroughly negative perspective on economic stress, addressing its diverse negative consequences and the ways that people try to cope with them. And even when following the advice provided by the scientific literature, people affected by economic stress will usually end up being off worse than they were before the onset of the stressor.

The current chapter pays credit to this perspective yet also tries to counterbalance it with an alternative one. While acknowledging the vast amount of literature outlining the negative consequences of economic stress on peoples’ well-being and careers, some literature also points at opportunities for a more positive perspective. More specifically, we argue that affected people can use a wide repertoire of behaviors for handling their current situation. Of particular promise in this regard is the concept of career adaptability, generally defined as the ability to change to fit into new career-related circumstances. Indeed, studies show that under certain conditions, career adaptability can facilitate people's search for not just any job but for a qualitatively better job, thus breaking through the spiral of losses usually associated with economic stress.

For the purpose of this argument, we link career adaptability to the concept of proactive coping, analyzing how and under which conditions career adaptability may present a contextualized form of proactive coping. We then address known personal and situational antecedents of career adaptability and show how career adaptability may be fostered and trained among different types of job seekers. We end this chapter with a discussion of open questions as well as directions for future research.

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Zeljko Sevic

This article analyses value preferences and basic cultural behavioural patterns in two fairly diverse countries/societies: Britain and Yugoslavia. It is, from the very…

Abstract

This article analyses value preferences and basic cultural behavioural patterns in two fairly diverse countries/societies: Britain and Yugoslavia. It is, from the very outset, assumed that both countries are undergoing a period of significant social changes, both political and social. The UK is introducing the policy of devolution with significant constitutional changes pending, while the Yugoslav society is recovering from the conflict in the area, economic slowdowns and is searching for its new identity. Due to long‐standing British interests in the Balkans, the attractiveness of a virtually unpenetrated Yugoslav market and the vast opportunities for investment pending the solution of political crises in the Balkans, it is expected that British investors, companies and entrepreneurs will be interested in establishing business links in Yugoslavia, and therefore it is more than useful to analyse basic cultural patterns of both societies, expressed through public opinion polls and informal exchange of opinions (used only in anecdotal manner). It is concluded that although both societies are shaped in the dominant European manner, there are also many differences between them, but none of them so significant as to pose an obstacle to a successful business co‐operation.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2013

Manuel Castriotta, Paola Barbara Floreddu, Maria Chiara Di Guardo and Francesca Cabiddu

Despite the fundamental role that digital social media could play in the process of consumer co-creation, academic research on this topic is still in its infancy. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the fundamental role that digital social media could play in the process of consumer co-creation, academic research on this topic is still in its infancy. The overall aim of the chapter is to consider how digital social media can be used by firms to encourage and sustain co-creation behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

We draw a multiple case analyses, focusing on the insurance industry, particularly on the Italian insurance market.

Findings

We particularly extend the literature on value co-creation by proposing a composite framework that enables us to grasp the different strategies that firms implement in their different manners of employing digital social media.

Practical implications

We set forth a research agenda for managerial scholars that can help understand how social media should be incorporated in the day-to-day operations of insurance companies.

Details

Social Media in Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-898-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Georg Hauer, Nadine Naumann and Patrick Harte

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of digital transformation on the intersection of marketing and sales departments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of digital transformation on the intersection of marketing and sales departments.

Design/methodology/approach

This area has received little attention in academic literature while considerable amount of research exists surrounding the marketing and sales integration, the influence of the trend of digital transformation on both departments and how it affects their collaboration is not investigated in-depth and is therefore studied by qualitative research via semi-structured interviews in six German organizations.

Findings

By considering the findings the collaboration between the marketing and sales departments in German organizations is perceived as good. However, generation-related conflicts occur due to different demographic structures of employees. The study provides evidence that the digital transformation affects the marketing and sales integration and thus, the overall organizational performance.

Originality/value

Moreover, it is crucial that organizations face the challenges that occur in terms of interdepartmental relationships and be aware of the huge potentials which arise due to digital transformation to improve the marketing and sales collaboration.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Miha Škerlavaj, Catherine E. Connelly, Matej Cerne and Anders Dysvik

The belief that knowledge actually expands when it is shared has been deeply rooted in the mainstream knowledge management literature. Although many organizations and…

Abstract

Purpose

The belief that knowledge actually expands when it is shared has been deeply rooted in the mainstream knowledge management literature. Although many organizations and managers expect employees to share their knowledge with their colleagues, this does not always occur. This study aims to use the conservation of resources theory to explain why employees who experience greater time pressure are more likely to engage in knowledge hiding; it further considers how this behavior may be moderated by these employees’ prosocial motivation and perspective taking.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses quantitative multi-study research design as a combination of two-wave field study among 313 employees at an insurance company and a lab experimental study.

Findings

In the field study (Study 1), the authors find that perceived time pressure is positively related to knowledge hiding. Furthermore, this relationship is moderated by prosocial motivation: employees who perceive greater time pressure hide knowledge only when they are low in prosocial motivation. An experiment (Study 2) replicates these findings, and finds that perspective taking mediates the moderating effect of prosocial motivation on the relationship between time pressure and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

Despite its many contributions, the present research is also not without limitations. Study 1 was a cross-lagged sectional field study with self-reported data (although the two-wave design does help alleviate common-method-bias concerns). Causality concerns were further alleviated by using additional experimental study.

Practical implications

The paper highlights important reasons why people hide knowledge at work (because of experienced time pressure) as well as identifies two interlinked potential remedies (prosocial motivation and perspective taking) to reduce knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to expanding nomological network of knowledge hiding construct by extending the set of known antecedents and contingencies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Leila A. Halawi, Richard V. McCarthy and Jay E. Aronson

Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

We review the existing literature on KM and strategy formulation. We utilize the resource‐based view approach as a lens for fitting KM with strategic planning. The concept of strategy and KM integration is introduced.

Findings

We relate KM strategies to business strategy through a thorough review of the literature.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate the circumstances under which KM can create a sustainable competitive advantage within the framework of the RBV. Another area involves the investigation of the degree of integration between the competitive strategy and KM strategy.

Practical implications

A very useful source of information for practitioners to refine their thinking about KM and the firm strategic resources. It offers the practitioner a framework for understanding strategy concepts while illustrating how we can derive business results from KM.

Originality/value

This paper offers practical help for corporate executives and practitioners embarking in a KM initiative or program.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Gloriana St. Clair and Rose Mary Magrill

Anyone who has tried to review studies relating to use of academic libraries may argue that a great deal of research exists on college students and how they use their…

Abstract

Anyone who has tried to review studies relating to use of academic libraries may argue that a great deal of research exists on college students and how they use their libraries. Studies of reading habits and library use among college students have been appearing for more than fifty years, and the diligent student can compile an impressive bibliography of these studies. In spite of all we have learned about student interaction with library resources, there is still much we do not know.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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