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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Stephen A. Doyle, Christopher M. Moore, Anne Marie Doherty and Morag Hamilton

The paper seeks to explore the phenomenon of the flagship store from the perspective of brand management and brand context within the luxury furniture sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore the phenomenon of the flagship store from the perspective of brand management and brand context within the luxury furniture sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopts a case‐study approach, focusing upon Milan‐based furniture manufacturer and retailer B&B Italia and comprises interview derived data and archive material.

Findings

Recognises the difficulty associated with manufacturing/product‐orientated organisations to establish a brand context. It identifies that the forward integration of luxury manufacturing companies into retailing, through the establishment of flagship stores provides such companies with an opportunity to provide a context for their brand and exercise a level of control over its manifestation that is difficult to achieve through other distribution channels.

Research limitations/implications

Highlights the value of forward integration as a means of establishing brand context and experience.

Originality/value

Demonstrates the wider value of the flagship store as a brand management device and the potential contribution to brand communication for non‐retail based organisations.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Stephen A. Doyle and Adelina Broadbridge

The importance of design as a composite in the strategic mix is often undervalued or ignored by retailers, yet it may present a significant competitive tool by which…

Abstract

The importance of design as a composite in the strategic mix is often undervalued or ignored by retailers, yet it may present a significant competitive tool by which small/medium‐sized retailers can compete more effectively. Considers the significance of design factors to customers in influencing their perception of and satisfaction with a retail chain, and how recognition of these factors might serve to address differences in perception between the company and its customers and communicate a holistic message to those customers. Concludes that the holistic nature of design and its informed status could serve to achieve a more coherent offer to the customer, which takes cognisance of customer feedback, the competitive environment and the skills and resources available to the organisation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

M. Christopher, Stephen A. Doyle and Elaine Thomson

Explores the impact of divorce upon the fashion consumption of divorced men. Based upon 104 semi‐structured interviews with divorced men, the study identifies four stages…

Abstract

Explores the impact of divorce upon the fashion consumption of divorced men. Based upon 104 semi‐structured interviews with divorced men, the study identifies four stages of fashion shopping behaviour of divorced male consumers. In particular, the study notes that divorced men expect fashion retailers to provide a range of services in order to minimise the risk and uncertainty that they experience while shopping for fashion. The experiences of respondents indicate that their service expectations are generally left unsatisfied. As such, there are obvious opportunities for fashion retailers to differentiate their positioning through the provision of relevant customer services to all male consumers and not only those that are divorced.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Stephen A. Doyle and Jenny Reid

This paper aims to consider the adaptability of the traditional growth strategies of couture/fashion houses in the context of non‐fashion sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the adaptability of the traditional growth strategies of couture/fashion houses in the context of non‐fashion sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a case study approach based upon David Linley & Co. Ltd, a furniture design company, it explores the relevance of implementing a strategy based upon product extension as a means to market development and internationalisation.

Findings

The research demonstrates the distinct and conscious similarities between the strategy adopted by the company and that of the fashion houses as delineated in the literature. The paper concludes that there is value in pan‐sector consideration in respect of strategic planning, particularly when there are acknowledged similarities in the relative positioning of the companies within their markets.

Originality/value

Provides information on the strategic thinking of one company – based on the probable experiences and expectations of customers – which may have wider applicability in other areas of the fahion industry.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Christopher M. Moore, Anne Marie Doherty and Stephen A. Doyle

Employing the qualitative method, this paper sets out to investigate the role and function of flagship stores as a market entry mechanism employed by luxury fashion retailers.

Abstract

Purpose

Employing the qualitative method, this paper sets out to investigate the role and function of flagship stores as a market entry mechanism employed by luxury fashion retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs an interpretive research position, utilising qualitative techniques in the form of semi‐structured interviews with élite informants. In total, 12 luxury fashion retailers form the empirical focus of the work.

Findings

The paper identifies the defining characteristics of luxury retailers' flagship stores. It finds that luxury flagship stores represent a strategic approach to market entry that is employed to support, enhance and develop distribution activities within a foreign market. The interdependence of flagship stores and the wholesaling method of distribution is highlighted. The importance of the flagship store in reinforcing and enhancing the retailer's luxury status and enhancing and maintaining relationships not only with customers but also with distribution partners and the fashion media is found to be significant.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical information to luxury retailers on the role and importance of flagship stores as a method of entering international markets.

Originality/value

Flagship stores are a pivotal aspect of any luxury fashion retailer's internationalisation strategy. For the first time in the literature, the paper provides insights into their form and function and an understanding of why they are crucial to the international development of luxury retailers despite their prohibitively high cost.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Stephen A. Doyle

This paper focuses on the decay and subsequent regeneration of Harlem, New York. It identifies the importance of retail provision in residential areas, not only in terms…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the decay and subsequent regeneration of Harlem, New York. It identifies the importance of retail provision in residential areas, not only in terms of service provision, but also in terms of its social and economic function. Furthermore, it reveals how residents view retailing activity as a health indicator, whereby low levels of retailing provision are signs of unattractiveness and disadvantage and, as such, the increase in retail activity is seen as indicative of regeneration and of affirmation of a community's “worth”. Finally, the paper highlights the high levels of awareness of the community in recognising the processes of decay and regeneration, and its role in arresting the spiral of decay.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Stephen A. Doyle, Christopher M. Moore and Louise Morgan

The over‐arching purpose of this research is to explore the issue of supplier management within the context of fast‐moving fashion retailing.

Abstract

Purpose

The over‐arching purpose of this research is to explore the issue of supplier management within the context of fast‐moving fashion retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research utilising key informant interviews was used.

Findings

The research suggests that retailers may adopt a multi‐tiered approach, whereby dynamism and responsiveness are achieved through only partially agile supply chains.

Practical implications

Based on the nature of the qualitative data, the paper provides useful insight into the mechanism by which retailers may balance the need for customer responsiveness with the need for operational and financial viability.

Originality/value

The research highlights the need for the establishment of relationships, the benefits of developing a networked approach, and suggests three distinct stages for a multi‐staged approach.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Christopher M. Moore and Stephen A. Doyle

The purpose of this paper is twofold. In its initial stages it undertakes a review of the key fashion industry‐related themes emerging from the IJRDM. Subsequently, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. In its initial stages it undertakes a review of the key fashion industry‐related themes emerging from the IJRDM. Subsequently, it reflects upon these themes in the context of luxury fashion brand Prada and in so doing identifies four key change phases in the evolution of the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of literature spanning 20 years.

Findings

The paper identifies five overarching general themes. These comprise fashion retailer brands, the internationalisation of fashion retailing, the emergence and challenges of on‐line fashion retailing, changes in the supply chain and changes in consumption.

Originality/value

The paper provides a valuable overview of the main research themes within the context of fashion retailing. In addition, it provides a critical insight into the changing nature of Italian luxury fashion brand Prada.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2011

Stephen Brown

The literary world is an elitist enclave, where anti‐marketing rhetoric is regularly encountered. This paper aims to show that the book trade has always been hard‐nosed…

Abstract

Purpose

The literary world is an elitist enclave, where anti‐marketing rhetoric is regularly encountered. This paper aims to show that the book trade has always been hard‐nosed and commercially driven.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is less a review of the literature, or a theoretical treatise, than a selective revelation of the commercial realities of the book business.

Findings

The paper shows that the cultural industries in general and the book business in particular were crucibles of marketing practice long before learned scholars started taking notice. It highlights the importance of luck, perseverance and, not least, marketing nous in the “manufacture” of international bestsellers.

Research limitations/implications

By highlighting humankind's deep‐seated love of narrative – its clear preference for fiction over fact – this paper suggests that marketing scholars should reconsider their preferred mode of research representation. Hard facts are all very well, but they are less palatable than good stories, well told.

Originality/value

The paper makes no claim to originality. It recovers what we already know but appear to have forgotten in our non‐stop pursuit of scientific respectability.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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