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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Zeibeda (Zeb) Sattar, Stephanie Wilkie and Jonathan Ling

This paper aims to explore residents' perceptions of a refurbishment programme to sheltered housing schemes and its impact on their well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore residents' perceptions of a refurbishment programme to sheltered housing schemes and its impact on their well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology draws upon a realist evaluation framework. Four participatory appraisals (PAs) and 19 interviews with residents were conducted in the sheltered housing schemes. Ages of participants ranged from 50 to 99 years.

Findings

Two categories of residents were identified: healthy active older adults and older frail adults (or over 85+). Residents said their social and emotional well-being improved from the provision of indoor and outdoor communal areas. Older frail residents only accessed the new communal spaces when staff took them in their wheelchairs. The physical changes increased opportunities for social connections for residents. Conservatories and sensory gardens were most popular. Residents felt that structured activities in the new spaces and digital training would improve their social activities.

Research limitations/implications

The participatory methods spanned over an hour, and some residents felt too tired to complete the full session.

Practical implications

A practical limitation was that some sensory rooms were not fully completed at the time of the evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper adds the following: Perceptions of residents of a refurbishment programme in sheltered housing and the impact on their well-being. Perceptions of residents about social activities after a refurbishment programme. Perceptions of residents about the impact of physical changes to their sheltered housing schemes and impact on their internal accessibility to the improvements.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Sarah Powell

281

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen and Michael Beverland

This study aims to explore surprising gifts received and given by close relations to identify the variables involved in creating surprising gifts. The analysis of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore surprising gifts received and given by close relations to identify the variables involved in creating surprising gifts. The analysis of the viewpoints of the giver and the recipient, reflecting their profiles, leads to recommendations for retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, small-scale, open-ended questionnaire (48 respondents) produces 43 (38) accounts of surprising gifts given (received), informed further by in-depth interviews (eight informants, both givers and recipients of surprising gifts).

Findings

This study identifies and elaborates on the variables (why, when, what, where, who and how, and their combinations) that define surprising gift giving, from both giver and recipient perspectives. The findings indicate a paradox: even if givers or recipients prefer a surprising gift, they might give or wish for an unsurprising gift to avoid disappointment.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should confirm the findings using representative samples. Moreover, gender differences in surprising gift giving should be investigated further. Finally, the exact characteristics and properties that make common objects potential candidates for successful surprising gifts should be studied further.

Practical implications

The discussion has relevant implications for manufacturers and retailers. For example, if recipients are surprised, happy and satisfied, they likely exhibit higher brand recall. The recipient’s (happy versus not happy) emotions also have spillover effects on the giver’s. Thus, retailers should provide assistance in the store and advertise their salespeople as experts who can offer advice about selecting appropriate gifts. The exact characteristics and properties that make common objects potential candidates for successful surprising gifts should be studied further.

Originality/value

The systematic account of all six variables, not previously analyzed in the literature, provides rich insights into surprising gift giving. The discussion of the study of givers and recipients supplements these insights.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend…

Abstract

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend to defeat its purpose. Time, however, is of the essence and this is set for various aspects of legal action by limitation of actions legislation, which sets periods after which the case is no longer actionable. The periods are adequate and in civil law, generous to avoid injustice being done. The one serious complaint against the process of law, however, is the unwarrantable delays which are possible despite limitation. From the far‐off days of Equity, when Dickens' Jarndyce v Jarndyce, caricatured and exaggerated as it was, described the scene down to the present when delays, often spoken of in Court as outrageous are encountered, to say nothing of the crowded lists in the High Courts and Crown Courts; the result of the state of society and not the fault of the judiciary. Early in 1980, it was reported that 14,500 cases were awaiting trial in the Southeastern Circuit Crown Court alone. Outside the Courts legal work hangs on, to the annoyance of those concerned; from house purchase to probate. Here, the solicitor is very much his own master, unhampered by statutory time limits and the only recourse a client has is to change this solicitor, with no certainty that there will be any improvement, or appeal to the Law Society.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Constantine Andriopoulos and Stephanie Slater

The authors seek to show the extent and nature of qualitative research in international marketing in IMR (International Marketing Review) and then aim to understand and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors seek to show the extent and nature of qualitative research in international marketing in IMR (International Marketing Review) and then aim to understand and explain developments in this area. They explore the global coverage of extant qualitative work in IMR and reflect on the thematic focus, theoretical purpose, research design and transparency of methods prevailing in these studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify and content-analyze 79 qualitative international marketing-focused articles published in IMR from 1990 to 2010.

Findings

The analysis revealed several areas that can assist researchers in identifying gaps to be filled by future qualitative international marketing studies. These include: global coverage needs to be further developed; an increase in the number of comparative studies, yet insights from three or more countries remain scarce; extant qualitative studies seem to explore ten key themes; there is a growing trend in theory elaboration studies; interviews are still the most popular data collection method, yet the repertoire of methods is expanding; there is an upward trend in higher transparency in the description of data collection and analysis, but this needs further development.

Originality/value

The paper fosters the development of qualitative research in international marketing by: highlighting the value of qualitative research for advancing theory in this field; inspiring international marketing scholars to learn more about qualitative methods; and offering guidelines to researchers that seek to advance this field.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Stephanie Hui-Wen Chuah, Eugene Cheng-Xi Aw and Ming-Lang Tseng

The purpose of this study is threefold, which is as follows: investigate the mediating effect of brand fan page attractiveness on the relationship between user…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is threefold, which is as follows: investigate the mediating effect of brand fan page attractiveness on the relationship between user gratifications and customer engagement with brand fan pages, determine whether fan page agility moderates this effect and examine the influence of fan page engagement on customers' share of wallet and resistance to negative brand information.

Design/methodology/approach

By using an online questionnaire, 614 valid responses were obtained from the followers of multiple Facebook brand fan pages. Partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results indicate that fan page attractiveness mediates the relationship between user gratifications and fan page engagement. However, this relationship is moderated by fan page agility. Fan page engagement increases customers' share of wallet and resistance to negative brand information. This finding suggests that creating fan page content and interactions that are attractive to customers is not sufficient for promoting engagement; brand fan pages must also be agile to customers' changing needs and competitors' moves.

Originality/value

By proposing and testing a novel moderated mediation effect, this study enriches the uses and gratifications theory (UGT) and provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms and boundary factors driving fan page engagement. In addition, this study contributes to the customer engagement literature by introducing share of wallet and resistance to negative brand information as outcome variables.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Stephanie Gillison, Alexa Martinez Givan, Sharon E Beatty, Kyoungmi (Kate) Kim, Kristy Reynolds and Julie Baker

This paper aims to explore the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip to better understand the experiences and process that occur during these shopping trips. Adolescent…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip to better understand the experiences and process that occur during these shopping trips. Adolescent girls and their mothers are an important shopping companion pair that has received minimal study.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigates the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip using in-depth interviews with 28 mothers, adolescent daughters and retail employees in the USA.

Findings

The interviews reveal that the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip consists of three important developmental experiences: conflict and struggle, education and influence and bonding between mother and daughter. Similarities and differences between middle- and high-school daughters relative to these issues are explored.

Originality/value

This study is the first to bring together the interplay processes of conflict, education and influence and bonding during mother–adolescent daughter shopping trips. This study extends research regarding family identity interplay, companion shopping, adolescent identity development and consumer socialization. The authors find that the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip involves daughters’ efforts to separate from their mothers and form their own identities, often producing struggle and conflicts; daughters developing as consumers and individuals; and an opportunity to bond.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Teresa Davis, Margaret K. Hogg, David Marshall, Alan Petersen and Tanja Schneider

398

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Nur Al Ali, Andres Arriaga and Margarita Rubio

The purpose of this paper is to design a culinary education program and ascertain its impact on knowledge, phobias, culinary skills and diet quality in schoolchildren.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design a culinary education program and ascertain its impact on knowledge, phobias, culinary skills and diet quality in schoolchildren.

Design/methodology/approach

Repeated measures design to determine changes after the implementation of the culinary education program in a pre-school and primary school located in a Madrid (Spain) neighborhood with a low socioeconomic level. A total of 58 children agreed to participate in the program and 40 parents authorized the evaluation of the effect of the program. Variables were measured with Student’s t-test or Wilcoxon-signed range test for quantitative variables. Effect size was calculated by Cohen’s d.

Findings

The mean scores in knowledge and beliefs improved from 5.0 to 7.8 (P < 0.001; Cohen’s d = 1), the mean value obtained in the food phobias test decreased from 24.6 to 20.7 (P = 0.01; Cohen’s d = 0.53), diet quality on Kid Med Test score increased from 7.4 to 8.2 (P = 0.06; Cohen’s d = 0.38), and the children improved their culinary skills from 21.2 to 27.9 (P < 0.001; Cohen’s d = 0.66).

Research limitations/implications

Self-declared data could lead to information biases. Other limitations were the lack of control group and a scarce statistical power that could explain the absence of statistical significance in the results on diet quality. To observe the effects of this change on eating habits, long-term evaluations would have to be carried out.

Originality/value

The brand-new culinary education program had a positive effect on children’s knowledge of nutrition and culinary skills as well as reducing food phobias. This proposal is beyond the state-of-the-art and could be implemented elsewhere with a robust effect on children, parents and educators.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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