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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09596119010002179. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09596119010002179. When citing the article, please cite: Amanda J. West, Stephanie M. Jameson, (1990), “Supervised Work Experience in Graduate Employment”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Vol. 2 Iss: 2.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Stephanie M. Jameson and Rick Holden

Discusses the second phase of a project on graduate employment in small hospitality firms. It explores the data from the first phase of the project using the concept of…

Abstract

Discusses the second phase of a project on graduate employment in small hospitality firms. It explores the data from the first phase of the project using the concept of graduate identity. The views of both graduates and their managers are examined. The reflections on the data suggest that a complex relationship exists between graduates, their managers and graduate identity. Suggests that hospitality graduates in small firms fail to develop a sense of graduate identity and that their managers lack understanding on how the employment of graduates “makes some difference”. Nevertheless, it is affirmed that graduate identity offers a useful perspective for much‐needed further research on the transition of graduates into SME employment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Amanda J. West and Stephanie M. Jameson

The relationship between supervised work experience and hospitalitygraduate employment is examined. Research which indicates thathospitality employers must consider…

Abstract

The relationship between supervised work experience and hospitality graduate employment is examined. Research which indicates that hospitality employers must consider supervised work experience as a key factor influencing graduates′ first destinations is identified. It proposes that further research is necessary to enhance the success of graduate recruitment and retention strategies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Stephanie M. Jameson and Simon Hargraves

The “demographic time bomb” will haveimplications for all industries, especially in therecruitment of graduates. This situation isexplored with reference to the hotel and…

Abstract

The “demographic time bomb” will have implications for all industries, especially in the recruitment of graduates. This situation is explored with reference to the hotel and catering industry in the UK. Research carried out into the job opportunities for graduates in this sector of industry is reported with regard to the types of job package offered; training; levels of responsibility and career prospects; salary and fringe benefits. It was found that the packages offered exhibit similarities and differences when compared with those offered by other industries and concludes that the present situation in the hotel and catering industry may have arisen from a failure to regard itself as competing in the wider graduate labour market.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Stephanie M. Jameson

The hospitality and tourism industries are two of the fastest growing and most dynamic sectors of the UK economy. Both industries are highly labour intensive and…

Abstract

The hospitality and tourism industries are two of the fastest growing and most dynamic sectors of the UK economy. Both industries are highly labour intensive and, because of this, the effective management of human resources is critical to their success. A defining characteristic of these industries is the high incidence of small firms. The issue of training in the small business sector in general has been neglected by academics and management specialists and this is also the case specifically in tourism and hospitality. This article goes some way to address this gap in knowledge and examines the recruitment and training practices of small tourism and hospitality firms. The issues examined include sources of recruitment, the extent to which small tourism and hospitality firms had training plans and training budgets, participation, and evaluation of training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Peter J. McGunnigle and Stephanie M. Jameson

Explores human resource management (HRM) and the established relationships between HRM, the management of “commitment cultures”, the recruitment and selection procedures…

Abstract

Explores human resource management (HRM) and the established relationships between HRM, the management of “commitment cultures”, the recruitment and selection procedures, and the training and development practices considered necessary to develop employee commitment. The literature suggests that organizations adopting an HRM approach desire employee commitment, have in place sophisticated, objective recruitment and selection methods in order to achieve this, and have structured training and development systems to encourage commitment to the organization. Shows, however, that while there is a clear desire for commitment, little evidence is found of contemporary recruitment and selection methods commensurate with this aim. In contrast, there is strong evidence of relatively sophisticated training and development systems congruent with an HRM approach. Concludes that currently there is little to suggest a shift towards HRM in UK hotels

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Miloš Krstić

Purpose: The paper aims to examine the link between the indicators of competitiveness of World Economic Forums (WEFs) in the area of higher education, on the one hand, and…

Abstract

Purpose: The paper aims to examine the link between the indicators of competitiveness of World Economic Forums (WEFs) in the area of higher education, on the one hand, and the Global Competitiveness Index 4.0 and ‘Future Orientation of Government’ sub-pillar, on the other.

Method: Consideration of the link between the mentioned link will be conducted on a sample that includes European Union member countries and potential members. The key information basis for conducting this research makes data from the Global Competitiveness Report 2019 of the WEF. The research was conducted by applying multiple regression analysis.

Findings: The results of the research show that there is a positive correlation between higher education, on the one hand, and the level of national competitiveness and sustainable development, on the other.

Practical Implications: The obtained results of empirical research can serve as a ‘global benchmark’ of future public policy in the field of higher education in the analyzed countries.

Originality/Value: The key contribution of this paper is reflected in providing a clearer insight into the competitiveness factors of the analyzed countries that are expressed in the field of sustainable development and higher education and pointing out the priority activities of competent state authorities to their improving and raising the level of national competitiveness.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Rick Holden and Stephanie Jameson

In the context of a somewhat turbulent graduate labour market, attention is being focused on the employment of graduates in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs)…

Abstract

In the context of a somewhat turbulent graduate labour market, attention is being focused on the employment of graduates in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). This paper takes an initial “sounding” of our understanding about the transition of graduates into such organisations. While research data provides some insight into the barriers which work to discourage more SMEs from recruiting graduates, this understanding appears inadequate and insufficiently segmented to provide a detailed knowledge of the problems. A prevailing assumption is that graduates lack skills required by SME employers. Yet the limited research findings reveal ambiguity about the extent to which SMEs effectively deploy graduate labour. The article proposes an agenda that highlights the need for two types of research. First, a clearer picture of current trends in the SME graduate labour market. Second, a richer understanding of the real experience of graduates, and their managers, in relation to employment in an SME and the implications of such for both the supply and demand sides of the graduate labour market.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Andreas Walmsley, Rhodri Thomas and Stephanie Jameson

This paper seeks to explore undergraduate placement experiences in tourism and hospitality SMEs, focusing on the notions of surprise and sense making. It aims to argue…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore undergraduate placement experiences in tourism and hospitality SMEs, focusing on the notions of surprise and sense making. It aims to argue that surprises and sense making are important elements not only of the adjustment process when entering new work environments, but also of the learning experience that placements provide.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were conducted with 20 students who had recently completed a 48 week placement.

Findings

The paper finds that the surprises students encountered were not as dramatic as the literature on organisational entry suggests. This is partially explained by students already having gained substantial amounts of work experience prior to the placement. A number of SME‐characteristic employment experiences were confirmed while others were questioned.

Research limitations/implications

Further detailed research is required that takes a more holistic account of the placement experience in order to understand more fully the impact of placement on learning and career choices.

Practical implications

The paper raises important questions about the value of undergraduate placements in an age of mass higher education where many students work part‐time.

Originality/value

An apparent lack of reflection hindered the sense making process, which raises questions as to whether placements are achieving their potential for experiential learning.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Rick Holden, Stephanie Jameson and Andreas Walmsley

A report conducted for the Government in 2002 concluded that public policy, although rising to the challenges presented in stimulating a stronger relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

A report conducted for the Government in 2002 concluded that public policy, although rising to the challenges presented in stimulating a stronger relationship between supply and demand in the SME graduate labour market, was essentially “running blind”. SMEs were clearly playing an increasingly important role in the wider graduate labour market, yet the evidence base on patterns of recruitment, deployment and graduate contribution was weak and insubstantive. The purpose of this paper is to revisit this issue and critically review research undertaken since 2002.

Design/methodology/approach

A decision was taken to critically review the research literature published in the UK on graduate employment in SMEs since 2002 as this was the year that the original report was presented to the Government. The methodological design draws out the main findings from the 2002 report and the associated research agenda. This is then used as a basis from which to evaluate recent research. The methodological design ensures that the key themes of graduate recruitment and utilization are addressed within the context of the overall SME graduate labour market.

Findings

The data suggest that whilst there may be some “glimmers of light”, serious deficiencies remain in relation both to information about the SME graduate labour market in general and to the utilization of graduates in particular. There was an apparent shift in the research agenda, towards graduate enterprise and business start‐up.

Originality/value

Provides a timely review of the evidence base in an area which has seen increasing policy interventions. Draws an important parallel with emergent research in the specific field of graduate start‐up.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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