Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Tricia J. Burke, Stephanie L. Dailey and Yaguang Zhu

People spend a lot of time communicating with their co-workers each day; however, research has yet to explore how colleagues influence each other’s health behaviors. The…

Abstract

Purpose

People spend a lot of time communicating with their co-workers each day; however, research has yet to explore how colleagues influence each other’s health behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between health-related communication and health behaviors among co-workers in a workplace wellness program.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n=169) were recruited from a large south-western university and its local school district through e-mail announcements sent from a wellness administrator. Participants were part of a workplace wellness program that offers several daily group fitness classes, as well as cooking classes, and other educational programs for faculty and staff.

Findings

Structural equation modeling was used to examine the association between people’s perceived social influence and social support from co-workers, organizational socialization and their health behaviors. Results indicated that perceived social influence from co-workers had an indirect effect on people’s health behaviors through their perceived social support from their co-workers, as well as through their organizational socialization.

Research limitations/implications

These variables were examined cross-sectionally, meaning that causal relationships and directionality cannot be determined in this study.

Practical implications

Co-worker communication and socialization appear to be important factors in understanding individuals’ health behaviors; thus, organizations that offer workplace wellness programs should provide opportunities for socialization and co-worker communication to facilitate employees’ healthy behaviors.

Originality/value

Although the authors only looked at one wellness program and did not examine these variables in programs of varying sizes and types, this study uniquely incorporates interpersonal and organizational communication perspectives in order to give new insight into co-workers’ health-related communication.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Stephanie van de Sanden, Kim Willems, Ingrid Poncin and Malaika Brengman

  1. Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.
  2. The majority of DS networks feature…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

  1. Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.

  2. The majority of DS networks feature content that is generic and is rarely tailored to the audience passing by the screens. As a result, digital displays are often ignored.

  3. DS coupled with sensors and Artificial Intelligence allow for more relevant and personalized experiences.

  4. Relevance through personalization can help retailers overcome display blindness, but challenges in terms of legal restrictions and ethical concerns exist to unlock its potential.

  5. Nontouch interaction technologies, such as voice assistants, gesture controls, facial recognition, and augmented reality, present new ways of interacting with digital screens.

Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.

The majority of DS networks feature content that is generic and is rarely tailored to the audience passing by the screens. As a result, digital displays are often ignored.

DS coupled with sensors and Artificial Intelligence allow for more relevant and personalized experiences.

Relevance through personalization can help retailers overcome display blindness, but challenges in terms of legal restrictions and ethical concerns exist to unlock its potential.

Nontouch interaction technologies, such as voice assistants, gesture controls, facial recognition, and augmented reality, present new ways of interacting with digital screens.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Abstract

Details

Gifted Education: Current Perspectives and Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-741-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2013.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Abhijit Patwardhan, Stephanie M. Noble and Ceri M. Nishihara

The primary purpose of this research is to explore the use of strategic deception as adopted by call centers endeavoring to establish relationships with consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this research is to explore the use of strategic deception as adopted by call centers endeavoring to establish relationships with consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews, over the telephone and in person, were conducted with call center employees located in India.

Findings

The findings reveal various types of strategic deception occurring in call centers. Discoveries imply that companies are training their employees to deceive consumers in order to win their trust and cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

To improve generalization of the findings, future research should include call centers located in other parts of the world and determine if other types of companies use deception in any way to build trust and perceived similarity with their customers. The paper offers an overarching typology to guide future research in this area.

Practical implications

In this research a framework is provided by which practitioners might judge the desirability of using strategic deception in light of length of relationship and reason for the consumer interaction. Future research would more fully explicate the feasibility of such deceptive approaches at various levels/depths of interaction.

Originality/value

This study adds to extant relationship marketing literature by introducing the concept of strategic deception that is counterintuitive in terms of building relationships given the theoretical importance of self‐disclosure, trust, and honesty with consumers. It also describes specific instances of strategic deception employed in foreign call centers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5