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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Glenn D. Searle and Stephanie J. Hanrahan

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological design was used to investigate leaders' personal and lived experiences of leading to inspire others. In‐depth interviews were conducted with seven participants nominated by others as inspiring leaders based on the demonstration of five characteristics (vision, openness, transparency, passion, and being somewhat unconventional).

Findings

Participant responses coalesced into five key dimensions of leading to inspire others: connecting, leading, inspiree, action, and context; enabling a functional description of the phenomenon. Furthermore, results indicated that leaders could intentionally cultivate opportunities to inspire others through interaction and effort.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the paper investigates leaders' experiences of the phenomenon, further investigation into the relational and reciprocal aspects of inspiring others is required. Research has primarily focused on participants in the inspiring relationship independently of each other (i.e. either the inspiree or the leader).

Practical implications

Contrary to assertions in some transformational leadership studies that personal charisma is the primary component to inspiring others, these findings indicate that inspiring others requires an active process where leaders establish interpersonal connections and enable action.

Originality/value

Research on inspiration is at a formative stage. This paper represents an initial foray into the space where scholarly knowledge on leadership theory and inspiration intersect to provide greater insight into leading to inspire others.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Stephanie A. Macht and John Robinson

Entrepreneurial businesses often face financial and experiential gaps, which can constrain their growth. Business angels (BAs) can provide sources of financial, human and…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial businesses often face financial and experiential gaps, which can constrain their growth. Business angels (BAs) can provide sources of financial, human and social capital to overcome these gaps. Building on the work by Munck and Saublens, this paper aims to introduce a framework that seeks to provide a detailed understanding of the benefits that BAs can bring to the firms in which they invest.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to obtain a detailed understanding of the benefits that BAs bring to their investee companies, semi‐structured, in‐depth telephone interviews were conducted from an investee perspective. The key managers of nine angel‐funded companies were purposefully selected and the transcribed interviews analysed with the help of common qualitative analysis techniques.

Findings

According to investee managers, BAs provide benefits in all four areas of the proposed framework. Specifically, BAs: help overcome funding gaps; fill knowledge/experience gaps through provision of their own expertise and involvement; provide a wide range of contacts and leverage further funding, including their own follow‐on finance.

Research limitations/implications

The anonymous nature of the BA market requires convenience sampling, which, in addition to the small sample size used, does not allow for generalisability. The use of telephone interviews instead of face‐to‐face interviews did not allow for observation of non‐verbal cues. Nevertheless, the study identified various areas in need of further research.

Originality/value

In‐depth interview data enabled a detailed exploration of the financial and non‐financial benefits of BA funding from an under‐utilised investee perspective. The paper's main value, however, lies in establishing the usefulness of a framework showing BAs' benefits in a structured manner.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Jonathan C. Clayfield, Albert J. Grudzinskas, William H. Fisher and Kristen Roy-Bujnowski

Large numbers of adults with mental illness detained by police, seen in the courts, and confined in prisons and jails has been a longstanding concern of officials in the…

Abstract

Large numbers of adults with mental illness detained by police, seen in the courts, and confined in prisons and jails has been a longstanding concern of officials in the mental health and criminal justice systems. Diversion programs represent an important strategy to counteract the criminalization of persons with mental illness. The challenge is to identify and integrate resources in such a way that an organization bridging the police, courts, mental health, substance abuse, homelessness, welfare and entitlements agencies would evolve that would effectively and appropriately serve offenders with mental health issues, keeping them stable in the community and reducing recidivism.

Details

The Organizational Response to Persons with Mental Illness Involved with the Criminal Justice System
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-231-3

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2010

Stephanie Hartwell

Purpose – This chapter describes the problem of and approaches to ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities exiting correctional custody. Although all ex-inmates must find…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter describes the problem of and approaches to ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities exiting correctional custody. Although all ex-inmates must find housing and employment, persons with psychiatric disabilities require linkages to various health-related services and supports. These linkages are necessary, but it is unknown whether they are sufficient because discharge planning services and transition programs for ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities historically lack an evidence base.

Approach – After a decade, the first-generation re-entry programs for ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities have yielded little in the way of empirical data, but they have provided models for program expansion and imperatives for second-generation program assessment. Related research findings for first- and second-generation programs are highlighted with an emphasis on a unique statewide program in Massachusetts.

Findings – A review of the first- and second-generation programs suggests that progress has been slow in identifying empirically supported best practices for this population. There is a growing evidence base that community reintegration outcomes for ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities are the result of demographic and criminal history variations, yet implications of these variations needs further exploration in the realms of service access and receptivity as well as variations in postrelease adaptation.

Implications – More knowledge and innovative research is needed on the experience of ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities and social integration. Resources for cost effectiveness studies as well as long-term follow-up qualitative studies are necessary.

Details

New Approaches to Social Problems Treatment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-737-0

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Lucy Meredith Butcher, Miranda Rose Chester, Leisha Michelle Aberle, Vanessa Jo-Ann Bobongie, Christina Davies, Stephanie Louise Godrich, Rex Alan Keith Milligan, Jennifer Tartaglia, Louise Maree Thorne and Andrea Begley

In Australia, the Foodbank of Western Australia (Foodbank WA) has a reputation for being at the forefront of health promotion. The purpose of this paper is to describe…

Abstract

Purpose

In Australia, the Foodbank of Western Australia (Foodbank WA) has a reputation for being at the forefront of health promotion. The purpose of this paper is to describe Foodbank WA's innovative food bank plus approach of incorporating healthy lifestyle initiatives (i.e. nutrition and physical activity education) into its core food bank business, so as to target priority issues such as food insecurity, poor food literacy, overweight, obesity, poor nutrition and physical inactivity.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was utilised to explore Foodbank WA's Healthy Food for All® (HFFA) strategy. HFFA is a comprehensive state wide, school and community based strategy, including the School Breakfast Programme, Food Sensations® and Choose to Move initiatives, designed to promote healthy lifestyles to low socioeconomic and vulnerable groups – a major target group of food banks.

Findings

Since its inception in 2007, the delivery of food, education and resources has increased across all of Foodbank WA's HFFA initiatives. Evaluation results from feedback surveys demonstrate the success of these interventions to positively impact upon food security, health and wellbeing of participants.

Originality/value

HFFA is a unique, effective and novel strategy that addresses a number of health and nutrition issues. Food banks are well placed to deliver food literacy and healthy lifestyle initiatives. Foodbank WA's holistic approach and demonstrated success provides other food banks with a best practice model and knowledge base for the development of similar health promotion strategies and interventions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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