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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Greta Kliewer, Amalia Monroe-Gulick, Stephanie Gamble and Erik Radio

The purpose of this paper is to observe how undergraduate students approach open-ended searching for a research assignment, specifically as it affected their use of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe how undergraduate students approach open-ended searching for a research assignment, specifically as it affected their use of the discovery interface Primo.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 undergraduate students were provided with a sample research assignment and instructed to find resources for it using web tools of their choice, followed by the Primo discovery tool. Students were observed for 30 minutes. A survey was provided at the end to solicit additional feedback. Sources students found were evaluated for relevance and utility.

Findings

Students expressed a high level of satisfaction with Primo despite some difficulty navigating through more complicated tasks. Despite their interest in the tool and previous exposure to it, it was usually not the first discovery tool students used when given the research assignment. Students approached the open-ended search environment much like they would with a commercial search engine.

Originality/value

This paper focused on an open-ended search environment as opposed to a known-item scenario in order to assess students’ preferences for web search tools and how a library discovery layer such as Primo was a part of that situation. Evaluation of the resources students found relevant were also analyzed to determine to what degree the students understood the level of quality they exhibited and from which tool they were obtained.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Stephanie Bramley, Caroline Norrie and Jill Manthorpe

People experiencing homelessness are being identified as a potentially vulnerable group in relation to gambling-related harm. The purpose of this paper is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

People experiencing homelessness are being identified as a potentially vulnerable group in relation to gambling-related harm. The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between gambling-related harm and homelessness.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review of the English-language literature was conducted in 2016-2017 using a wide range of international sources. Qualitative content analysis was employed to code and identify key themes within the literature.

Findings

Five themes were identified: emerging knowledge about why people experiencing homelessness may participate in gambling; emerging knowledge about the prevalence of gambling within the homeless population; the likelihood that gambling-related harm is under-reported within the homeless population; emerging knowledge about the extent that people experiencing homelessness access gambling support services; and limited awareness about the potential impact of gambling participation among people experiencing homelessness.

Originality/value

The paper reviews research concerning the links between gambling, gambling-related harm and homelessness, which may be relevant to those working with people experiencing homelessness.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jill Manthorpe, Stephanie Bramley and Caroline Norrie

Opportunities to gamble have boomed in the UK in recent years, since the passing of the Gambling Act 2005. The implications of this for adults with care and support needs…

Abstract

Purpose

Opportunities to gamble have boomed in the UK in recent years, since the passing of the Gambling Act 2005. The implications of this for adults with care and support needs and for safeguarding services have not been greatly investigated. The purpose of this paper is to address the interface of how gambling affects adults with care and support needs in England and adult safeguarding.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the scoping review which focussed on adults with care and support needs and gambling-related harm. It also included literature on perpetrators who exploit adults with care and support needs to fund their own or others’ gambling. The overall aims of this scoping review were to explore what is known about gambling-related harm affecting adults with care and support needs, the gaps in the evidence base, and specifically to refine the interview questions for the wider study.

Findings

There is some evidence that adults with care and support needs experience or are at risk of gambling-related harm. There is, however, lack of data from safeguarding services about this affecting adults at risk and safeguarding practice and systems. A public health approach to gambling is advocated by some, as well as effective regulation and support for people who have problems with their own or others’ gambling.

Originality/value

Industry operators, practitioners, and policymakers are increasingly paying attention to gambling-related harm but there is a lack of focus on adults with care and support needs or implications for adult safeguarding.

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Publication date: 15 March 2021

Stephanie Chitpin

Abstract

Details

Understanding Decision-Making in Educational Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-818-0

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Stephanie Kay Ann Cheah and Brian Low

The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy such as solar energy is difficult and requires significant ongoing public policy marketing initiatives. Drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy such as solar energy is difficult and requires significant ongoing public policy marketing initiatives. Drawing on institutional theory, this paper aims to explore how public policy marketing initiatives through institutional narratives and discourses legitimize solar energy's sustainable consumption in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a post-structuralist approach, the authors undertook a thematic analysis to study the process of sustainable consumption. The authors conducted face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders in the solar energy sector and complemented the primary data with secondary analysis of archived published materials and podcasts.

Findings

First, narratives on conformance rules and regulations (regulatory legitimacy) are significant sustainable consumption predictors of solar energy. However, the top-down regulatory legitimation narrative alone is insufficient to overcome poorly developed taken-for-granted (cognitive legitimacy) and morally correct consumption behavior (normative legitimacy), especially among the general population. Second, while consumption is primarily seen as a micro-level, residential and commercial customers phenomenon, the intersecting macro- (government) and meso-levels' (industry/market) narratives and discourses influence and direct micro-level consumption.

Originality/value

Future research agenda on legitimizing the sustainable consumption of solar energy needs to consider the dynamic interactions of institutional narratives and discourses through the lens of institutional theory and practice. Sustained, bold and provident government interventions and actions through market structure and policy issues play a crucial role in the consumption process, particularly in developing economies.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Stephanie Best, Arja Koski, Lynne Walsh and Päivi Vuokila-Oikkonen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach highlights three real-life examples of day to day experiences in mental health nurse education with innovative approaches to sharing and developing co-production skills and attitudes in mental health student nurses.

Findings

The case studies highlight three settings where undergraduate mental health nurses experience co-production through a world café event and dialogical community development. Common themes include setting the environment, developing a common aim and relationship building.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this paper is that only three case studies are provided, further examples would provide a greater pool of exemplars for others to draw on. However, by focusing upon student nurse education in learning environment, these examples are transferable to other settings.

Practical implications

The practical applications are summarised in a four-step model that can help develop co-productive teaching methods; enable educators to set the climate and generate an understanding of co-production that empowers students and service users.

Social implications

The emphasis and relevance of promoting co-productive working habits early on in nurses’ mental health nursing careers will enable them to raise awareness of future social implications for a range of client groups.

Originality/value

This paper focuses upon mental health student nurses whilst providing an innovative model to facilitate co-production experiences applicable in a range of settings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Lauren T. Meaux, Stephanie C. Doran and Jennifer M. Cox

Unconscious biases against certain groups aid in forming assumptions which may be promulgated in the USA via popular news media linking rare but memorable violent acts…

Abstract

Purpose

Unconscious biases against certain groups aid in forming assumptions which may be promulgated in the USA via popular news media linking rare but memorable violent acts with specific groups. However, the relationship between marginalized group association, assumptions regarding the motive for violent acts and individual media consumption has never been directly examined. This study aims to directly examine this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present study, individuals read a vignette of a mass shooting in which the perpetrator’s implied religion (i.e. Islam or unknown religion) was manipulated. Participants then indicated their assumptions regarding motive (i.e. terrorism or mental illness) and personal media consumption habits.

Findings

Contrary to hypotheses, differences in assumed motive based on implied religion were not found; participants were not more likely to associate an assumed Muslim perpetrator with terrorism as a motive or consider the assumed non-Muslim perpetrator to be mentally ill.

Originality/value

These unexpected findings are discussed in the context of the data-collection period, which coincidentally overlapped with a well-publicized act of domestic terrorism that led to a unique national debate regarding biased news coverage and associations between religion, ethnicity, terrorism and mental illness.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Nerilee Hing, Vivienne McCabe, Peter Lewis and Neil Leiper

This paper reviews recent trends in major hospitality sectors in the Asia‐Pacific region. Observes that the meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (MICE)…

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15736

Abstract

This paper reviews recent trends in major hospitality sectors in the Asia‐Pacific region. Observes that the meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (MICE), backpacker, and bed and breakfast sectors are growing, characterised by burgeoning market demand, proliferation of specialist infrastructure, sector‐specific education and training, and dedicated development and marketing strategies. The casino sector is facing major challenges, seeing declining demand in some areas. Competitive forces are evident in the licensed clubs sector, where a proliferation of gambling options has undermined traditional sources of revenue. Conversely, the hotel and restaurant sectors can be considered mature. There is increased attention to facilities development, asset management, market segmentation and use of new technologies, and the restaurant sector appears focused on product revitalisation. Concludes that the recent economic turmoil in Asia will no doubt produce new challenges, as well as opportunities, in the lead up to the next millennium.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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1768

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

No one would dispute that the current recession is the most serious of its kind for more than a generation. Where commentators and business people alike find difficulty establishing common ground is in a discussion about whether things are now on the up, or whether the worst is yet to come – the dreaded “double dip” of which some experts talk. For everyone in the former camp there is someone in the latter. On the BBC 1 news earlier this year, by use of a split screen, economics editor Stephanie Flanders was seen having an argument with herself about whether we should now be optimistic or pessimistic about the outlook. It illustrated the way that, for every glass‐half‐full argument, an equally valid glass‐half‐empty one can be made. Nevertheless, it's always been true in the business world that one man's misfortune is another man's opportunity and the recent economic crisis offers many cases of this process in action.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Stephanie E. Pitts, Marta Herrero and Sarah M. Price

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of donors to a UK-based contemporary music organisation fundraising scheme through the theoretical lens of liminality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of donors to a UK-based contemporary music organisation fundraising scheme through the theoretical lens of liminality.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with 16 members of the Sound Investment scheme investigated the motivations and experiences of individual donors to the commissioning of new music. Thematic analysis suggested parallels with the framework of “liminality,” which shed new light on the ways in which membership changed donors' relationships with the organisation and audience.

Findings

Motivations for supporting contemporary music commissioning included personal interest, cultural responsibility and alignment to the values of the organisation. Tangible benefits, particularly access to rehearsals, brought donors into closer connection with the creative and managerial working of the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample did not include any lapsed donors, or people who had chosen not to participate. Future research could test the liminal framework in different artforms and through different tangible benefits.

Practical implications

Understanding donors as liminals could help arts organisations to develop membership schemes that more effectively sustain individual giving. Key elements of involvement and access are identified that could engage audiences more widely.

Originality/value

This case study foregrounds lived experience of arts donors where previous literature has primarily focussed on motivations for donating. It highlights the liminal elements of becoming an individual donor, namely, the integration and socialisation processes, the space-and time-bound interactions with the organisation and the alignment of values with the organisation. This framework offers a new way for arts organisations to understand and enhance individual giving in a time of austerity.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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