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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Stephanie Dellande and Prashanth Nyer

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g. weight loss, retirement savings, education, credit repair, are long term in nature, often requiring lifestyle changes. In addition, and importantly, the customer's role in CDS extends beyond the face‐to‐face interaction and requires the consumer to comply with prescribed behaviors when away from the service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The subjects were 243 female clients (aged 20 to 45) at a weight loss/fitness center located in south India. Subjects were selected from among the new clients who signed up for an eight‐week long weight loss and fitness program which seeks to help clients lose modest amounts of excess weight (averaging approximately ten pounds). On signing up, respondents completed a survey that included several scales of regulatory focus, and a question eliciting reasons for wanting to lose weight.

Findings

This study exams the role of self‐regulatory focus (SRF) in long‐term customer compliance behavior in weight loss. A specific measure of SRF led to better outcomes than the generalized measures of SRF.

Originality/value

Though this research project examines consumer behavior in the context of weight loss activities, it has far‐ranging implications for various services requiring consumers to engage in prescribed behaviors over the long run. For example, the success of debt counseling services and retirement savings programs require clients to engage in certain behaviors over the long run. Marketers of CDS programs will be able to use the findings of this research project to find new ways to increase long‐term customer compliance behavior.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Stephanie Dellande and Andrew Saporoschenko

This paper proposes a conceptualization of factors that influence the ability of individuals to reduce their personal unsecured debt levels, especially credit card debt…

Abstract

This paper proposes a conceptualization of factors that influence the ability of individuals to reduce their personal unsecured debt levels, especially credit card debt. As such the paper's conceptualization offers relationship lessons for bank marketers in the USA and the UK, where bank credit cards are a key element of many bank marketing programs. A key contribution is the paper's focus on customer compliance behavior in a personal unsecured debt management program. Factors discussed within our conceptualization are behavioral variables and psychological variables. Also examined is the role of geographic and demographic explanatory variables in personal debt management program success.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Ravi Kathuria, Maheshkumar P. Joshi and Stephanie Dellande

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in growth strategies – domestic and international – of manufacturing and service firms. Hardly any literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in growth strategies – domestic and international – of manufacturing and service firms. Hardly any literature exists that empirically investigates the differences on account of the distinctive characteristics of goods and services, and such studies rarely draw from the operations management field.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple analysis of variance is used to analyze longitudinal data from multiple secondary sources.

Findings

Mixed services, such as banks, focus more on domestic growth and less on international growth. Manufacturers, such as chemical firms, focus more on international activities as compared to domestic activities. Mixed service firms seem to prefer collaborative approaches, whereas goods producers prefer wholly owned ventures.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection methodology applied in this study may be applicable to many other topics of operations management. Future researchers may examine internationalization of services from front and back office perspectives, and compare information‐processing, possession‐processing, and people‐processing services in their choices of mode of entry and resultant performance differences.

Practical implications

The findings are relevant for developing operations strategy, including location alternatives, for both manufacturing and service firms as different nations become a part of the global village. Appropriate modes of entry in an international arena for both service and manufacturing firms are identified.

Originality/value

A cross‐functional study that uses longitudinal data from secondary sources in an innovative way with significant implications for operations managers and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Harriette Bettis-Outland and Aberdeen Leila Borders

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Abhijit Patwardhan, Stephanie M. Noble and Ceri M. Nishihara

The primary purpose of this research is to explore the use of strategic deception as adopted by call centers endeavoring to establish relationships with consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this research is to explore the use of strategic deception as adopted by call centers endeavoring to establish relationships with consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews, over the telephone and in person, were conducted with call center employees located in India.

Findings

The findings reveal various types of strategic deception occurring in call centers. Discoveries imply that companies are training their employees to deceive consumers in order to win their trust and cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

To improve generalization of the findings, future research should include call centers located in other parts of the world and determine if other types of companies use deception in any way to build trust and perceived similarity with their customers. The paper offers an overarching typology to guide future research in this area.

Practical implications

In this research a framework is provided by which practitioners might judge the desirability of using strategic deception in light of length of relationship and reason for the consumer interaction. Future research would more fully explicate the feasibility of such deceptive approaches at various levels/depths of interaction.

Originality/value

This study adds to extant relationship marketing literature by introducing the concept of strategic deception that is counterintuitive in terms of building relationships given the theoretical importance of self‐disclosure, trust, and honesty with consumers. It also describes specific instances of strategic deception employed in foreign call centers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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