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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Stephanie Bell

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize principled plagiarism education in library learning commons.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize principled plagiarism education in library learning commons.

Design/methodology/approach

The synthesis of literature from library and information science, writing studies, and study skills illuminates academic cultures of speech reporting, causes of undergraduate student cheating behaviors and blunders in source use and attribution, and recommended best teaching practices.

Findings

Library learning commons are particularly well positioned to address student plagiarism as student-centric spaces with the potential to foster prosocial behaviors among students. Learning commons’ partner literatures reveal understandings of academic citation practices as multiple and fluid, tacit, ideological and skillful information literacies. Best practices for plagiarism education are developmental approaches aimed at socializing students into academic cultures of knowledge construction. These approaches to plagiarism education may preclude teaching academic integrity policy or participating in the enforcement of those codes of conduct.

Research limitations/implications

No survey of programs or their effectiveness was done for this paper. The effectiveness of the approach conceptualized here merits further study.

Originality/value

Contributions to fostering academic integrity support student success and the integrity of degrees and institutional reputation more broadly. This paper provides a model for interdisciplinary learning commons’ research.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Aegis Frumento and Stephanie Korenman

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Digital Realty Trust, Inc v. Somers and its significance for whistleblower retaliation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Digital Realty Trust, Inc v. Somers and its significance for whistleblower retaliation remedies and securities law interpretation generally.

Design methodology approach

The authors review the statutory, regulatory and decisional history of the anti-whistleblower retaliation remedies of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act and the Dodd–Frank Act; how they were seen by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and most courts to be in conflict, and how they were ultimately harmonized by the Supreme Court in Digital Realty.

Findings

In Digital Realty, the Supreme Court ruled against the SEC and the leading Courts of Appeal and established that only one who reports securities law violations to the SEC can sue in federal court under the Dodd–Frank Act; all others are limited to the lesser remedies provided by the Sarbanes–Oxley Act. This simple conclusion raises a number of unresolved questions, which the authors identify and discuss. Also, the Supreme Court unanimously continued the pattern of federal securities laws decisions marked by a close reading of the text and a desire to limit private litigants’ access to the federal courts.

Originality value

This paper provides valuable information and insights about the legal protections for SEC whistleblowers from experienced securities lawyers and more generally on the principles that appear to guide securities law decisions in the Supreme Court.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2019

Aegis Frumento and Stephanie Korenman

The purpose of this paper is to review the first two years of the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) efforts to regulate cryptosecurities to assess the trends of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the first two years of the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) efforts to regulate cryptosecurities to assess the trends of that regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the SEC’s official pronouncements and informal statements about, and its enforcement actions against participants in, various early experiments in cryptosecurities.

Findings

The SEC has been evolving how to apply the US securities laws to cryptosecurities since its report on The DAO two years ago. When “coins” on a blockchain meet the traditional Howey Test, it is easy to categorize them as “securities.” However, the bedrock regulatory principle that some person must account for violations is frustrated by automated blockchain transactions, where no human is in control. This tension risks a “moral crumple zone” arising around cryptosecurities, in which persons might become liable for violations that they cannot fairly be said to have caused.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable information and insights about the beginnings of US regulation of cryptosecurities and how the evolution of that regulation is trending after two years.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2013

D.Jean Clandinin

Teachers develop and use a special kind of knowledge. This knowledge is neither theoretical, in the sense of theories of learning, teaching, and curriculum, nor merely…

Abstract

Teachers develop and use a special kind of knowledge. This knowledge is neither theoretical, in the sense of theories of learning, teaching, and curriculum, nor merely practical, in the sense of knowing children. If either of these were the essential ingredient of what teachers know, then it would be easy to see that others have a better knowledge of both; academics with better knowledge of the theoretical and parents and others with better knowledge of the practical. A teacher’s special knowledge is composed of both kinds of knowledge, blended by the personal background and characteristics of the teacher, and expressed by her in particular situations. The idea of “image” is one form of personal practical knowledge, the name given to this special practical knowledge of teachers (Clandinin, 1985; Connelly & Dienes, 1982). In this chapter I show how one teacher’s image of the “classroom as home” embodies her personal and professional experience and how, in turn, the image is expressed in her classroom practices and in her practices in her personal life. Using a variety of classroom episodes gathered over two years with two teachers, I offer a theoretical outline of the experiential dimensions of an image and, in so doing, present image as a knowledge term which resides at the nexus of the theoretical, the practical, the objective, and the subjective.

Details

From Teacher Thinking to Teachers and Teaching: The Evolution of a Research Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-851-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Tingting Chung, Stephanie Wilsey, Alexandra Mykita, Elaine Lesgold and Jennifer Bourne

Mobile technologies, such as QR codes, play a particularly important role in scaffolding the child user’s active learning in informal environments. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile technologies, such as QR codes, play a particularly important role in scaffolding the child user’s active learning in informal environments. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of QR code scanning on two informal learning outcomes: increased interest and greater knowledge understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 91 children and their families participated in the study as part of the iQ Zoo Project. Children in both the smartphone group and the control group completed were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively before and then after their zoo visits.

Findings

Qualitative findings suggest that most children’s interest in learning about animals was sustained as a result of the experience. Quantitative results reveal that QR code scanning was effective in promoting knowledge gains, especially on subjects that are challenging for the informal learner. Findings were comparable across the younger (5–8) and older (9–12) age groups.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical support for the value and usefulness of mobile technologies such as QR code scanning for children's learning in informal environments.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Caroline R. Pitt, Adam Bell, Rose Strickman and Katie Davis

This paper aims to investigate the potential for digital badges to support alternate learning and career pathways in formal and informal learning environments. Stakeholder…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential for digital badges to support alternate learning and career pathways in formal and informal learning environments. Stakeholder groups in higher education and industry discussed how digital badges might transform current processes of admitting undergraduate students and hiring young professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders in higher education and the technology industry.

Findings

Interview participants expressed optimism about the potential for digital badges to make learning pathways visible to learners and external audiences and to promote equity in STEM (STEM: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and careers. Participants noted several obstacles, largely focused on issues of credibility and logistics of working with badges across settings.

Research limitations/implications

Though the research approach is limited in geographic scope, the findings have broad applicability and insight for the use of digital badges in general.

Practical implications

Education policymakers, employers and scholars will be able to use the insights from this investigation in their efforts to find innovative ways to expand and diversify the STEM workforce, as well as support a wider range of learners than is currently supported by initiatives aligned with the school-to-workforce pipeline metaphor.

Originality/value

This paper directly confronts issues of real-world applications of digital badges by discussing practical implications with college admissions officers and employers. The current study fills a need for research that investigates the use of digital badges across – as opposed to within – contexts.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Stephanie Walker, Sara Marcus, Rita Ormsby, Karen Mason, Monica Berger, Anamika Dasgupta, Catherine Stern, Ellen Sexton, Roman A. Santillan and Mitchell Brown

To report on keynote presentations at the 44th Annual LACUNY Institute held on May 18, 2007 in New York City, New York.

Abstract

Purpose

To report on keynote presentations at the 44th Annual LACUNY Institute held on May 18, 2007 in New York City, New York.

Design/methodology/approach

Conference report. Findings: The annual conference aims to provide attendees continuing professional education, invited papers and social events.

Originality value

Provides a review of some of the events of the conference.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Stephanie Chitpin

Abstract

Details

Understanding Decision-Making in Educational Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-818-0

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Rebecca Reynolds, Sam Chu, June Ahn, Simon Buckingham Shum, Preben Hansen, Caroline Haythornthwaite, Hong Huang, Eric M. Meyers and Soo Young Rieh

Many of today’s information and technology systems and environments facilitate inquiry, learning, consciousness-raising and knowledge-building. Such platforms include…

Abstract

Purpose

Many of today’s information and technology systems and environments facilitate inquiry, learning, consciousness-raising and knowledge-building. Such platforms include e-learning systems which have learning, education and/or training as explicit goals or objectives. They also include search engines, social media platforms, video-sharing platforms, and knowledge sharing environments deployed for work, leisure, inquiry, and personal and professional productivity. The new journal, Information and Learning Sciences, aims to advance our understanding of human inquiry, learning and knowledge-building across such information, e-learning, and socio-technical system contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article introduces the journal at its launch under new editorship in January, 2019. The article, authored by the journal co-editors and all associate editors, explores the lineage of scholarly undertakings that have contributed to the journal's new scope and mission, which includes past and ongoing scholarship in the following arenas: Digital Youth, Constructionism, Mutually Constitutive Ties in Information and Learning Sciences, and Searching-as-Learning.

Findings

The article offers examples of ways in which the two fields stand to enrich each other towards a greater holistic advancement of scholarship. The article also summarizes the inaugural special issue contents from the following contributors: Caroline Haythornthwaite; Krista Glazewski and Cindy Hmelo-Silver; Stephanie Teasley; Gary Marchionini; Caroline R. Pitt; Adam Bell, Rose Strickman and Katie Davis; Denise Agosto; Nicole Cooke; and Victor Lee.

Originality/value

The article, this special issue, and the journal in full, are among the first formal and ongoing publication outlets to deliberately draw together and facilitate cross-disciplinary scholarship at this integral nexus. We enthusiastically and warmly invite continued engagement along these lines in the journal’s pages, and also welcome related, and wholly contrary points of view, and points of departure that may build upon or debate some of the themes we raise in the introduction and special issue contents.

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Carol L. Esmark, Stephanie M. Noble and John E. Bell

This paper aims to examine the impact of an open loyalty programme (anyone can join) versus a selective programme (requirements must be met) to show what types of loyalty…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of an open loyalty programme (anyone can join) versus a selective programme (requirements must be met) to show what types of loyalty programmes are most effective. In-group identification, gratitude, stage of relationship and visibility are additionally examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies use experimental methodology to initially test the relationships. A third study uses survey and panel data.

Findings

Open programmes lead to more in-group identification, while selective programmes lead to higher levels of gratitude, especially in mature stages. Visible programmes lead to more in-group identification. Industry differences are presented.

Research limitations/implications

The first two studies use a student sample (although Study 3 uses penal data). The research is limited to the variables examined. The findings add to theory by showing differences between open and selective loyalty programmes.

Practical implications

The findings show how different retailer offerings change the value and experience to the customer leading to loyalty intentions. Loyalty programme designers can tailor their programme structure to fit their customers and overall strategy. The findings also shed light on the strategic importance of tiered loyalty programmes.

Originality/value

The examination of how a customer enters a loyalty programme is not in current literature. The research shows how loyalty intentions are impacted by design of the programme, including how a customer signs up for a programme. The mechanisms through which the relationship works increase the understanding of loyalty programme effectiveness.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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