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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Stephanie Bae

The purpose of this study is to investigate how various relationships an employee builds within the organization affect their willingness to stay with the company…

1316

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how various relationships an employee builds within the organization affect their willingness to stay with the company. Specific research objective was to examine impact of social exchange on organizational commitment in the hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey using Qualtrics' panel database was used to collect data. The target was full-time employees in the hospitality industry. A total of 245 surveys were collected and used for data analysis. The results were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results of hypotheses testing showed that internal service quality and perceived organizational support have positive relationships with organizational commitment.

Originality/value

These findings can help hospitality managers develop programs and interact with employees in order to increase commitment and a sense of belonging with the company.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Stephanie Bae, Jun Mo Kwon and Alyssa Bosley

The main purpose of this study is to investigate what affects a customer's decision to use the hotel smartphone applications when he/she makes a room reservation.

1810

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to investigate what affects a customer's decision to use the hotel smartphone applications when he/she makes a room reservation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 266 usable data was collected through an online survey. The research model was tested using confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study revealed that perceived usefulness, perceived credibility, perceived equipment risk, and perceived change risk affected customers' intention to book a hotel room using hotel smartphone apps. Perceived ease of use did not have a significant effect on behavioral intention.

Originality/value

This study extended TAM and the existing literature of mobile technology in the lodging industry. This article explored both existing variables and new variables in studying customers' intention to use hotel smartphone apps when booking a hotel room.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Jun Mo Kwon, Jung‐in (Stephanie) Bae and Shane C. Blum

The purpose of this study is to examine customer intentions to download mobile applications in the hospitality industry. Even though major hospitality companies offer the…

8010

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine customer intentions to download mobile applications in the hospitality industry. Even though major hospitality companies offer the mobile applications, many customers have not utilized them. The results showed what encouraged customers to download mobile applications in the hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The Technology Acceptance Model was applied for this research to explain customer intentions. College students were the target population of this study because they understand and adopt the technology well. Therefore, mobile applications will become a popular way to purchase goods and services when university students will have purchasing power.

Findings

Even though major hospitality companies offer mobile applications, more than a half of respondents responded that they had not used mobile applications from the hospitality firms. The results showed that promotion information was not an only reason to download mobile applications; however, the results also showed that consumers who enjoy using smartphones and who are confident in themselves are more likely to download the mobile applications.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected in a university; therefore, generalizability is one of the limitations of this research. Multiple regressions only verify the relationship between dependant and independent variables. University students may not have a chance to plan their trips so they may not need the mobile applications.

Originality/value

This study employed the TAM to examine the reasons why customers download mobile applications offered by companies in the hospitality industry. Literature discussing mobile applications in the hospitality industry is very scarce. This research will assist managements in utilizing their mobile applications.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Alisha Ali, S. Mostafa Rasoolimanesh and Cihan Cobanoglu

461

Abstract

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2022

John Paul Mynott and Stephanie Elizabeth Margaret O'Reilly

Lesson study (LS) is a collaborative form of action research. Collaboration is central to LS methodology, therefore exploring and expanding the understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Lesson study (LS) is a collaborative form of action research. Collaboration is central to LS methodology, therefore exploring and expanding the understanding of the collaborative features that occur in LS is a priority. This paper explores the features of collaboration in existing publications on LS to consider if, as Quaresma (2020) notes, collaboration is simplistically referred to within LS research.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative review of LS literature to explore LS collaboration through Mynott's (2019) outcome model and Huxham and Vangen's (2005) theory of collaborative advantage and inertia. 396 publications using “lesson study” and “collaboration” as key words were considered and reviewed, with 26 articles further analysed and coded, generating a collaborative feature matrix.

Findings

While collaboration in LS is referred to generically in the articles analysed, the authors found examples where collaboration is considered at a meta, meso and micro level (Lemon and Salmons, 2021), and a balance between collaborative advantage and inertia. However, only a small proportion of LS publications discuss collaboration in depth and, while the matrix will support future research, more focus needs to be given to how collaboration functions within LS.

Originality/value

Through answering Robutti et al.'s (2016) question about what can be learnt from the existing LS research studies on collaboration, this paper builds on Mynott's (2019) outcome model by providing a detailed matrix of collaborative features that can be found in LS work. This matrix has applications beyond the paper for use by facilitators, leaders of LS, and researchers to explore their LS collaborations through improved understanding of collaboration.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Stephanie Slater, Stan Paliwoda and Jim Slater

This paper examines the behaviour of Japanese pharmaceutical corporations in the light of recent merger activity, questioning strategic momentum theory given the…

Abstract

This paper examines the behaviour of Japanese pharmaceutical corporations in the light of recent merger activity, questioning strategic momentum theory given the particularly significant influence of culture on the decision‐making process in this market. The international performance of Japan’s pharmaceutical industry has been poor; therefore, we examine the regional orientation of the top global pharmaceutical TNCs, inquiring as to why there has not been greater convergence among Triad countries. Irrespective of cultural differences, this industry has been slow to respond to international macro change, but mergers, acquisitions, and other convergence strategies are now being observed.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Susan Brandis, John Rice and Stephanie Schleimer

Employee engagement (EE), supervisor support (SS) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) are important contributors to patient safety climate (PSC). The purpose of this…

1550

Abstract

Purpose

Employee engagement (EE), supervisor support (SS) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) are important contributors to patient safety climate (PSC). The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model that suggests the presence of a three-way interaction effect between EE, IPC and SS in creating a stronger PSC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using validated tools to measure EE, SS, IPC and PSC data were collected from a questionnaire of 250 clinical and support staff in an Australian health service. Using a statistical package (SPSS) an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Bivariate correlations between the derived variables were calculated and a hierarchical ordinary least squares analysis was used to examine the interaction between the variables.

Findings

This research finds that PSC emerges from synergies between EE, IPC and SS. Modelling demonstrates that the effect of IPC with PSC is the strongest when staff are highly engaged. While the authors expected SS to be an important predictor of PSC; EE has a stronger relationship to PSC.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for the development of patient safety programmes that focus on developing excellent supervisors and enabling IPC.

Originality/value

The authors provide quantitative evidence relating to three of the often mentioned constructs in the typology of patient safety and how they work together to improve PSC. The authors believe this to be the first empirically based study that confirms the importance of IPC as a lead marker for improved patient safety.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

David Albin, Jean‐Claude Rames, Claudia Dietel, Kai Lenfert, Stephanie Rossi, David Starkey, Joel Down, Ricard Pineda, Juan Carlos Sardon, Martin Goosey, John Graves, Narinder Bains, Frank Cristoph, Frank Smeets and Willy Gilen

In September 1998 six European companies involved in PCB manufacturing and electronic packaging started collaborating in a development project known as “PRIME”. The…

Abstract

In September 1998 six European companies involved in PCB manufacturing and electronic packaging started collaborating in a development project known as “PRIME”. The “Program for Re‐engineering and Innovating (PCB) Manufacturing and Equipment” project lost one of its original members in late 1999, and Coates Circuit Products joined as the dielectric supplier. The project is now approaching the mid‐term assessment (MTA), where alternative production scenarios will be discussed and the most attractive carried forward to fabricate test vehicles and ultimately demonstrator patterns. Some essential features of the project have already been demonstrated and these initial results will be presented.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

141

Abstract

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Stephanie van de Sanden, Kim Willems, Ingrid Poncin and Malaika Brengman

  1. Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.
  2. The majority of DS networks feature…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

  1. Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.

  2. The majority of DS networks feature content that is generic and is rarely tailored to the audience passing by the screens. As a result, digital displays are often ignored.

  3. DS coupled with sensors and Artificial Intelligence allow for more relevant and personalized experiences.

  4. Relevance through personalization can help retailers overcome display blindness, but challenges in terms of legal restrictions and ethical concerns exist to unlock its potential.

  5. Nontouch interaction technologies, such as voice assistants, gesture controls, facial recognition, and augmented reality, present new ways of interacting with digital screens.

Innovative technologies, such as DS, can engage different human senses and play an important role in enhancing the store atmosphere.

The majority of DS networks feature content that is generic and is rarely tailored to the audience passing by the screens. As a result, digital displays are often ignored.

DS coupled with sensors and Artificial Intelligence allow for more relevant and personalized experiences.

Relevance through personalization can help retailers overcome display blindness, but challenges in terms of legal restrictions and ethical concerns exist to unlock its potential.

Nontouch interaction technologies, such as voice assistants, gesture controls, facial recognition, and augmented reality, present new ways of interacting with digital screens.

1 – 10 of 18