Search results

1 – 10 of 126
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2019

Stephanie Alexander and Diana K. Wakimoto

This study aims to investigate the reference and public service models used at academic libraries in the California State University system.

Downloads
1074

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the reference and public service models used at academic libraries in the California State University system.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study used a qualitative mixed methods design with an online survey and follow-up interviews with public services librarians.

Findings

The majority of the libraries in this study continue to use a traditional reference model with a physical desk staffed by librarians. Some libraries have moved to tiered or on-call reference using students and staff to triage patron questions. The majority of libraries’ public service points also follow a traditional configuration with separate service points for reference and other library public services.

Research limitations/implications

As this research is limited to one public university system, the results may not be generalizable to all academic libraries. Replicating this research in other systems would increase the generalizability of the results and allow for the generation of potential best practices for reference models and public service point configurations.

Practical implications

Librarians who are considering changes to their reference models and service point layouts can use the results as a starting point for conversations about the benefits and challenges of various models as well provide support to create an environment where changes to the models can be successfully implemented.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few to investigate multiple academic libraries’ approaches to reference and public services in the research literature. As such, it addresses a gap in the literature that case studies alone cannot fill.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Karen Block, Lisa Gibbs, Susie Macfarlane and Mardie Townsend

The purpose of this paper is to present emergent findings from an evaluation of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden (SAKG) Program showing that the program promoted…

Downloads
1054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present emergent findings from an evaluation of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden (SAKG) Program showing that the program promoted appreciation of cultural diversity and inclusion of culturally diverse groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings reported here are from the qualitative component of a mixed-method, nonrandomized, pre- and post-comparison evaluation study. Focus groups and interviews were held with school principals, teachers, program specialist staff, parents, volunteers and children at the program schools.

Findings

In a culturally diverse school, the program enhanced the school’s capacity to engage and include children and families from migrant backgrounds. In less diverse settings, the program provided opportunities for schools to teach children about cultural diversity.

Research limitations/implications

Assessing the program’s impact on multicultural education was not a specific objective of this study, rather these findings emerged as an unanticipated outcome during interviews and focus groups that explored participants’ views on important changes to schools associated with the program. Thus, the quantitative component of the evaluation did not assess the extent of this program impact and further research is recommended.

Practical implications

The program may have particular value in culturally diverse schools, providing benefits in terms of engagement of children and families and potentially, in the longer term, associated improvements in learning outcomes.

Social implications

These findings suggest that the program can help to promote social equity and inclusion for culturally diverse groups.

Originality/value

This paper highlights critical equity implications associated with school-based programs’ capacity to include culturally and linguistically diverse groups.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Alison Graber, Stephanie Alexander, Megan Bresnahan and Jennie Gerke

Reference data collection tools facilitate the collection of in‐depth data about reference interactions. Since this information may influence decisions, library managers…

Abstract

Purpose

Reference data collection tools facilitate the collection of in‐depth data about reference interactions. Since this information may influence decisions, library managers should examine how these tools are used and assess how these data entry behaviors may impact the accuracy of the data. This paper aims to analyze reference staff perceptions and data entry behaviors using a reference data collection tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The two‐year mixed method study analyses reference staff perceptions and data entry behaviors related to the reference data collection tool used at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries. The authors identified six distinct data entry behaviors for analysis in this study.

Findings

The survey results indicate that staff consider the tool to be both easy to use and useful. These findings, under the technology acceptance model, indicate technology acceptance, which influences adoption and use of the tool. Though rates of adoption and use of the tool are high, the authors' analysis of behaviors indicate that not all users record reference interactions in the same way, and this inconsistency may impact the accuracy of collected data.

Practical implications

Inconsistency in data entry behaviors should inform the design of staff training sessions, best practice guidelines, and the tool's interface.

Social implications

If data are used to justify changes to services and collections, decision makers need to be confident that data accurately reflect activity at library service points.

Originality/value

Previous studies related to reference data collection mention the importance of consistent data entry practices, but no studies have explicitly evaluated how inconsistencies in use may impact the accuracy of data.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Marnie Badham, Kit Wise and Abbey MacDonald

This chapter examines cultural value creation through the 24 Carrot Gardens Project. Initiated by artist and curator Kirsha Kaechele of the Museum of Old and New Art, the…

Abstract

This chapter examines cultural value creation through the 24 Carrot Gardens Project. Initiated by artist and curator Kirsha Kaechele of the Museum of Old and New Art, the vision of 24 Carrot Gardens is to ‘sow seeds of lifelong learning’ in the areas of health, well-being and sustainability across school communities in Tasmania, Australia. What has eventuated over its five years is a complex relationship between the artful ‘gold standard’ delivered by professional artists and a contemporary art museum with an integrated teaching and site-based learning across the arts and sciences. Designed in response to the local environmental, cultural and socio-economic context, 24 Carrot Gardens has contributed to a growing sense of community engagement, interdisciplinary learning and a strong foundation of networked donor investment. With these multilayered interests across a diversity of stakeholders and partnerships, many competing systems of value are at play, with the potential to contribute a new value creation. Firsthand accounts of project contributors are situated amongst the scholarly literature to produce an examination of value exchange and creation including the cultural values identified in 24 Carrot Gardens: artistic and creative, economic and industrial and education and environmental. Following this interrogation of the expressed values in this case study, we offer a foundation for a new framework for understanding local cultural value.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Sanjeewa Pradeep Wijayaratne, Mike Reid, Kate Westberg, Anthony Worsley and Felix Mavondo

Food literacy is an emerging concept associated with the skills, capabilities and knowledge to prepare a healthy diet and make healthy food choices. This study aims to…

Downloads
2726

Abstract

Purpose

Food literacy is an emerging concept associated with the skills, capabilities and knowledge to prepare a healthy diet and make healthy food choices. This study aims to examine how a dietary gatekeeper’s intentions to prepare a healthy diet for their family, and the subsequent satisfaction that a healthy diet is achieved, is influenced by their food literacy and by barriers to healthy eating.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage cross-sectional study was undertaken with 756 dietary gatekeepers who completed a baseline (time 1) and a three-month follow-up (time 2) questionnaire. Partial least square-structural equation modeling was used to estimate relationships between gatekeeper food literacy, their demographic characteristics, socio-cognitive factors, time 1 satisfaction with the healthiness of the household diet and intention to provide a healthy family diet. The follow-up survey assessed subsequent satisfaction with the healthiness of the household diet and barriers to achieving it.

Findings

The results highlight the significance of the dietary gatekeeper’s food literacy in overcoming barriers to healthy eating and fostering increased satisfaction with the healthiness of the family diet. The research further highlights the influence of past satisfaction, attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Several demographics factors are also highlighted as influential.

Research limitations/implications

The research offers new insights into the role of food literacy in the home environment including its influence on the dietary gatekeeper’s satisfaction with the family diet. The current model also provides strong evidence that food literacy can reduce the impact of barriers to healthy eating experienced by gatekeepers. The research has limitations associated with the socio-economic status of respondents and thus offers scope for research into different populations and their food literacy, younger and early formed cohabiting and the negotiation of food and dietary responsibility and on intergenerational food literacy.

Practical implications

The current findings regarding the impact of food literacy have significant implications for government agencies, non-profit agencies, educational institutions and other related stakeholders in their effort to curb obesity. Implications exist for micro-level programmes and actions designed to influence gatekeepers, family members and households and at the macro level for policies and programmes designed to influence the obesogenicity of the food environments.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the first to offer evidence on the role of food literacy in the home environment and its ability to overcome barriers to healthy eating. The research provides social marketers and public policymakers with novel insights regarding the need for increased food literacy and for developing interventions to improve food literacy in dietary gatekeepers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Gozde Aydin, Alison Booth, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

Primary schools provide continuous, intensive contact with large numbers of children starting from a young age, thus providing an appropriate setting for the promotion of…

Abstract

Purpose

Primary schools provide continuous, intensive contact with large numbers of children starting from a young age, thus providing an appropriate setting for the promotion of healthy eating through food and nutrition education (FNE). This qualitative study explores the views of Australian primary school parents about FNE in primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 19 parents of primary school children from Victoria participated in semi-structured interviews. Audio recordings were transcribed and underwent thematic analysis using Nvivo. A total of three themes emerged: FNE topics currently taught in primary schools, essential food skills and knowledge for primary school children and the importance of FNE.

Findings

Most parents thought that FNE is as important as the core subjects of primary school. Parental support for FNE, which is delivered over a prolonged period, and expanded by hands-on content such as cooking and gardening classes was evident. Parents viewed these classes as likely to improve children's food-related knowledge and healthy eating behaviours. Parents expressed appreciation for schools' emphasis on food sustainability and its alignment with school policies and practices. Parents were keen to see more sustainability included in the curriculum.

Practical implications

These results may have implications for curriculum developers and schools, as the findings can assist the design of food and nutrition curricula for primary schools which can empower children as well as their families to make better food-related decisions.

Originality/value

Australian parents' views of FNE in primary schools have been under examined.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Nerilee Hing, Vivienne McCabe, Peter Lewis and Neil Leiper

This paper reviews recent trends in major hospitality sectors in the Asia‐Pacific region. Observes that the meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (MICE)…

Downloads
15736

Abstract

This paper reviews recent trends in major hospitality sectors in the Asia‐Pacific region. Observes that the meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (MICE), backpacker, and bed and breakfast sectors are growing, characterised by burgeoning market demand, proliferation of specialist infrastructure, sector‐specific education and training, and dedicated development and marketing strategies. The casino sector is facing major challenges, seeing declining demand in some areas. Competitive forces are evident in the licensed clubs sector, where a proliferation of gambling options has undermined traditional sources of revenue. Conversely, the hotel and restaurant sectors can be considered mature. There is increased attention to facilities development, asset management, market segmentation and use of new technologies, and the restaurant sector appears focused on product revitalisation. Concludes that the recent economic turmoil in Asia will no doubt produce new challenges, as well as opportunities, in the lead up to the next millennium.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Wallace Alexander Williams, Randolph-Seng Brandon, Mario Hayek, Stephanie Pane Haden and Guclu Atinc

The purpose of this paper is to examine how servant leadership and political skill combine to impact workplace spirituality and employee creativity.

Downloads
7285

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how servant leadership and political skill combine to impact workplace spirituality and employee creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were working adults recruited by graduate and undergraduate students from a US public regional comprehensive university. Data were collected across three time periods, with a final sample size of 280 participants.

Findings

The authors’ findings suggest that servant leaders impact employee creativity by fostering an environment that promotes workplace spirituality. Furthermore, this relationship is strengthened to the extent that the servant leader possesses high levels of political skill.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a foundation for the interplay between servant leadership and political skill. Therefore, the data collection procedures undertaken in this study (i.e. from sources in multiple organizations) are beneficial. A limitation to this study is the use of a single informant to measure all of the constructs, which may cause a bias in the results.

Practical implications

This study provides a foundation for the interplay between servant leadership and political skill. Therefore, the data collection procedures undertaken in this study (i.e. from sources in multiple organizations) are beneficial.

Originality/value

Although servant leadership research continues to receive increased attention in the extant literature, researchers have tended to focus on the relational aspects of servant leadership. Curiously, the “leader” side of servant leadership has been largely neglected. As a result, some have questioned the construct as a viable leadership model. Greenleaf (1977), however, noted that servant leaders also possess conceptual skills; yet, these skills are rarely included in servant leadership measurements or empirical studies. The authors argue that political skill captures the essence of these abilities, and that including it strengthens the servant leader’s impact on workplace spirituality, ultimately influencing employee creativity.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Mohammadreza Riahi, Fatemeh Karimi and Atefeh Ghaffari

The purpose of this paper is to present three-dimensional (3D) printing of structures with a new method called selective laser baking (SLB) of Poly Dimethyl Siloxane (PDMS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present three-dimensional (3D) printing of structures with a new method called selective laser baking (SLB) of Poly Dimethyl Siloxane (PDMS).

Design/methodology/approach

A 3D model is designed on the computer. PDMS Base is mixed with its hardener and poured into a container. Before it is hardened which normally occures after several hours, a CO2 laser selectively exposes different areas on the surface of the PDMS mixture according to the pattern of a slice of a 3D model designed on the computer. Because of the thermal effect of the CO2 laser, once exposed, PDMS heats up and hardens, producing a cured layer of PDMS which is attached to a base. The base with the cured layer is lowered in the container for a short distance and a layer of new uncured PDMS is spread over the previous layer. The laser exposes new areas again and hardens them. This process is repeated until the whole structure is fabricated.

Findings

The parameters involved in the baking process are investigated and the relation between temperature, mixing portion and laser irradiance on the curing time and layer thickness are investigated.

Originality/value

This fabrication technique is a unique fabrication method that helps to 3D print with two base polymers which their polymerization can be boosted by heat. This 3D printing method has not been presented earlier.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Luna Glucksberg

Based on a case study of the ‘regeneration’ of the ‘Five Estates’ of Peckham, a neighbourhood located in south-east London, this chapter considers the social implications…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a case study of the ‘regeneration’ of the ‘Five Estates’ of Peckham, a neighbourhood located in south-east London, this chapter considers the social implications of urban ‘regeneration’ processes from an anthropological perspective centred on concepts of waste and value and highlights the emotional turmoil and personal disruption that individuals affected by regeneration plans routinely experience.

Methodology/approach

An ethnographic approach is used based on participant observation, unstructured and semi-structured interviews as well as limited archival research. Life histories are central to the methodology and these result in the substantial use of long quotes from respondents, to highlight the ways in which they framed the issues as well as their opinions.

Findings

The chapter shows how urban regeneration processes that involve displacements and demolitions deeply affect the lives of estate residents. In juxtaposing the voices and experiences of local politicians, officers and residents it sheds light on the ways in which the values and interests of some individuals — those invested with more power, ultimately — ended up shaping regenerated landscapes. At the same time, the homes and communities valued by the residents who lived in them were demolished, removed and destroyed. They were wasted, literally and symbolically, erased from the landscape, their claims to it denied and ultimately forgotten.

Social implications

The chapter highlights how while the rhetoric of regeneration strives to portray these developments as improvement and renewal, the ethnographic evidence shows instead the other side of urban regeneration as wasting both communities and urban landscapes resulting in ‘state-led gentrification’.

Originality/value

Thinking about regeneration and recycling through waste and value allows us to consider these processes in a novel way: at a micro level we can look at the ways in which individuals attribute to and recognise value in different sets of objects and social relationships. At the macro level we can then observe how the power dynamics that shaped the situation resulted in only a specific view and set of values to be enacted and respected, while all others were silenced, wasted and literally expelled from Peckham.

Details

Social Housing and Urban Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-124-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of 126