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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Petra Kumi, Stephanie A. Martin, Vadim V. Yakovlev, Martin S. Hilario, Brad W. Hoff and Ian M. Rittersdorf

The paper introduces and illustrates the use of numerical models for the simulation of electromagnetic and thermal processes in an absorbing ceramic layer (susceptor) of a

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper introduces and illustrates the use of numerical models for the simulation of electromagnetic and thermal processes in an absorbing ceramic layer (susceptor) of a new millimeter-wave (MMW) heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to better understand interaction between the MMW field and the susceptor, choose the composition of the ceramic material and help design the physical prototype of the device.

Design/methodology/approach

A simplified version of the heat exchanger comprises a rectangular block of an aluminum nitride (AlN) doped with molybdenum (Mo) that is backed by a thin metal plate and irradiated by a plane MMW. The coupled electromagnetic-thermal problem is solved by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique implemented in QuickWave. The FDTD model is verified by solving the related electromagnetic problem by the finite element simulator COMSOL Multiphysics. The computation of dissipated power and temperature is based on experimental data on temperature-dependent dielectric constant, loss factor, specific heat and thermal conductivity of the AlN:Mo composite. The non-uniformity of patterns of dissipated power and temperature is quantified via standard-deviation-based metrics.

Findings

It is shown that with the power density of the plane wave on the block’s front face of 1.0 W/mm2, at 95 GHz, 10 × 10 × 10-mm blocks with Mo = 0.25 – 4% can be heated up to 1,000 °C for 60-100 s depending on Mo content. The uniformity of the temperature field is exceptionally high – in the course of the heating, temperature is evenly distributed through the entire volume and, in particular, on the back surface of the block. The composite producing the highest level of total dissipated power is found to have Mo concentration of approximately 3%.

Research limitations/implications

In the electromagnetic model, the heating of the AlN:Mo samples is characterized by the volumetric patterns of density of dissipated power for the dielectric constant and the loss factor corresponding to different temperatures of the process. The coupled model is run as an iterative procedure in which electromagnetic and thermal material parameters are upgraded in every cell after each heating time step; the process is then represented by a series of thermal patterns showing time evolution of the temperature field.

Practical implications

Determination of practical dimensions of the MMW heat exchanger and identification of material composition of the susceptor that make operations of the device energy efficient in the required temperature regime require and expensive experimentation. Measurement of heat distribution on the ceramic-metal interface is a practically challenging task. The reported model is meant to be a tool assisting in development of the concept and supporting system design of the new MMW heat exchanger.

Originality/value

While exploitation of a finite element model (e.g. in COMSOL Multiphysics environment) of the scenario in question would require excessive computational resources, the reported FDTD model shows operational capabilities of solving the coupled problem in the temperature range from 20°C to 1,000°C within a few hours on a Windows 10 workstation. The model is open for further development to serve in the ongoing support of the system design aiming to ease the related experimental studies.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering , vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Francis Bangou and Stephanie Arnott

This chapter is the actualization of an experimentation of two second language (L2) teacher educators (the authors) with(in) Deleuze and Guattari’s (1987) ontology and the…

Abstract

This chapter is the actualization of an experimentation of two second language (L2) teacher educators (the authors) with(in) Deleuze and Guattari’s (1987) ontology and the associated concepts of agencement, desire, rhizomes, becoming, and affect to contribute to the everchanging knowledge base associated with the work and experiences of teacher educators at a time when such contributions are urgently needed. More precisely, this chapter sought to illustrate what could happen when, as teacher educators and researchers, we become “intimate” with the various elements of a research–teaching–learning–writing agencement. To do so, the chapter presents research based on material collected as part of a study on a mentoring experience between the authors. The second author was preparing to teach an online graduate course in L2 education to in-service teachers for the first time, while the first author had more experience with online teaching. Through the rhizoanalysis of three vignettes, the authors engaged with(in) their experiences by considering how various elements of the research–teaching–learning–writing agencement – particularly the most intensively affective ones – impacted and were impacted by other elements. With(in) this process, desire emerged as a praxis and a force capable of generating new knowledge in part by encouraging teachers and teacher educators (1) to experiment with learning, teaching, and conducting research with(in) the productive energy of desire, and (2) to disrupt affective powers as well as the role played by the body in such a process.

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Racial Inequality in Mathematics Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-886-4

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Theresa G. Mercer, Andrew P. Kythreotis, Zoe P. Robinson, Terje Stolte, Sharon M. George and Stephanie K. Haywood

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study on the creation, development and utilisation of educational games by university students is presented. The paper discusses the case study in the context of Kolb’s experiential learning and dynamic matching model, Perry’s stages of intellectual development and Beech and Macintosh’s processual learning model. The data used were from questionnaire feedback from the pupils who played the games and students who designed the games. Further qualitative feedback was collected from local schools involved in playing the games created by the students.

Findings

Overall, the students responded positively to the assessment and would like to see more of this type of assessment. They enjoyed the creativity involved and the process of developing the games. For the majority of the skill sets measured, most students found that their skills improved slightly. Many students felt that they had learnt a lot about effectively communicating science. The school children involved in playing the student-created games found them accessible with variable degrees of effectiveness as engaging learning tools dependent on the game.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new approach to ESD which incorporates learner-centred arrangements within a full life cycle of game creation, delivery, playing and back to creation. The games can be used as a tool for enhancing knowledge and influencing behaviours in school children whilst enhancing ESD capacity in schools. The assessment also helps forge important links between the academic and local communities to enhance sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

James Ryan and Stephanie Tuters

The purpose of this paper is to describe a study that explores the discreet activist strategies of educational leaders who promote social justice.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a study that explores the discreet activist strategies of educational leaders who promote social justice.

Design/methodology/approach

Part of a larger project, this study employed qualitative methods. In particular, researchers interviewed 26 leaders – principals, vice principals, department heads, and central office officials who presided over both homogeneous and diverse schools, departments, and districts in and around a large Canadian city. Data were analyzed during and after data collection, and themes were identified, explored, and described.

Findings

Given the resistance they faced in their efforts to promote social justice, leaders found that they had to be strategic in their efforts. In particular, they had to position themselves in ways that reduced their visibility and increased their credibility. When they took action, they tended to adopt subtle rather than obvious strategies.

Originality/value

The harsh reality for activist educational leaders who promote social justice is that they will likely have to be strategic in the way they go about their work. Given the nature of their relationships with the organizations in which they work and the power differentials within which they operate, educational leaders may have to adopt low key or discreet strategies if they are to successfully promote their social justice agendas.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Saba S. Colakoglu, Niclas Erhardt, Stephanie Pougnet-Rozan and Carlos Martin-Rios

Creativity and innovation have been buzzwords of managerial discourse over the last few decades as they contribute to the long-term survival and competitiveness of firms…

Abstract

Creativity and innovation have been buzzwords of managerial discourse over the last few decades as they contribute to the long-term survival and competitiveness of firms. Given the non-linear, causally ambiguous, and intangible nature of all innovation-related phenomena, management scholars have been trying to uncover factors that contribute to creativity and innovation from multiple lenses ranging from organizational behavior at the micro-level to strategic management at the macro-level. Along with important and insightful developments in these research streams that evolved independently from one another, human resource management (HRM) research – especially from a strategic perspective – has only recently started to contribute to a better understanding of both creativity and innovation. The goal of this chapter is to review the contributions of strategic HRM research to an improved understanding of creativity at the individual-level and innovation at the firm-level. In organizing this review, the authors rely on the open innovation funnel as a metaphor to review research on both HRM practices and HRM systems that contribute to creativity and innovation. In the last section, the authors focus on more recent developments in HRM research that focus on ambidexterity – as a way for HRM to simultaneously facilitate exploration and exploitation. This chapter concludes with a discussion of future research directions.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-852-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2015

Han Shen, Chengyi Song, Mimi Li and Qian Jiang

SNS, namely social networking sites, has become one of the most effective and fast channels of information diffusion and dissemination. As an influential way of online…

Abstract

SNS, namely social networking sites, has become one of the most effective and fast channels of information diffusion and dissemination. As an influential way of online marketing, SNS has been increasingly used by tourism organizations and enterprises to shape their destination image. On the basis of previews literature of destination image and SNS, this paper used the text analysis software ROST Content Mining (ROST CM) System to do a case study of the SNS destination marketing of Singapore on Chinese market. The authors analyze the text related to Singapore tourism on the major SNS in mainland China: Renren, Sina Weibo, and Douban, through word frequency analysis and the social semantic network, to summarize the destination image of Singapore on SNS. The paper also focuses on the difference of image building by official and individual SNS. Results found by this paper can be used by the relevant tourism organizations and enterprises to improve their destination marketing and image building on SNS channels.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-271-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Stephanie Solansky, Vipin Gupta and Jifu Wang

This paper is a regional exploratory study of implicit leadership theories in two regions of China. The purpose of this paper is to compare ideal vs Confucian leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a regional exploratory study of implicit leadership theories in two regions of China. The purpose of this paper is to compare ideal vs Confucian leadership profiles and explore the possibility of a cultural hybrid perspective of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically explores leadership profiles through indigenous leadership research and compares implicit leadership theories of Confucian leadership and ideal leadership among a group of 128 managers representing two regions in mainland China. In doing so, measures developed by Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness that were translated into the local language are employed.

Findings

The results empirically show that a region known to have a deeper cultural entrenchment interprets Confucian ideology as ideal leadership, while a region more disconnected from the cultural center transforms its ideology based on more globally accepted leadership ideals.

Practical implications

The findings of this study caution leadership researchers (whether universally-etic or specifically-emic focused) from making generalizations regarding leadership. Although there might be some broad universals of leadership, context-specific leadership practices are deeply rooted between and within cultures.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by providing insight on implicit leadership theories in China and by proposing a culturally hybrid perspective of leadership based on globalization and cultural entrenchment forces.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Stephanie Barden and Geoff Bick

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to analyse the drivers, mediators and threats of commoditisation. To critically evaluate the merits of different…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to analyse the drivers, mediators and threats of commoditisation. To critically evaluate the merits of different marketing options that may be employed to avoid commoditisation. To critically assess the branding-focussed or customer-focussed strategies that could be used. To develop appropriate strategies for Biotronik SA to counter commoditisation in the future.

Case overview/synopsis

The case begins with the protagonist and managing director of Biotronik SA, Robbie Nel, brewing over a new industry development. One of the leading private hospital groups has sent an open invitation to medical device suppliers to tender, where the lowest-priced products will win shelf space in their cathlabs. Robbie has to decide whether to sacrifice Biotronik SA’s profit margins to win the tender or risk not being stocked in their cathlabs. Or, he must find an alternative non-price-based strategy to pursue. The medical device industry is facing increasing price pressures from various stakeholders in the device-purchasing process. The decision to purchase is no longer the responsibility of specialist physicians alone. International and local market trends indicate that the medical device industry is threatened by commoditisation. Robbie has to make a decision on changing the Biotronik SA business model and strategy in response to these macro trends.

Complexity academic level

This teaching case is aimed at postgraduate students, particularly those pursuing MBA, EMBA and Postgraduate Diploma programmes, as well as specialist masters and executive education. The students should have some work experience to comprehend and assess the case from a practical perspective.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Amy C. Reynolds, Catherine O’Mullan, Anja Pabel, Ann Martin-Sardesai, Stephanie Alley, Susan Richardson, Linda Colley, Jacquelin Bousie and Janya McCalman

In the highly gendered academic sector, womens’ high participation rates have not translated into equal career progression with men. Existing literature suggests that…

Abstract

Purpose

In the highly gendered academic sector, womens’ high participation rates have not translated into equal career progression with men. Existing literature suggests that early career publication success is a good indicator of long-term publication success. This research is intended to provide a better understanding of whether the notions of success espoused by neo-liberal universities align with the subjective measures of what constitutes academic success for women ECRs (early career researchers).

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines the perceptions of nine successful women ECRs at an Australian university. It uses collaborative autoethnography with thematic analysis of participants’ self-reflective narratives on being a successful ECR.

Findings

Five themes were identified. One focussed on objective academic success, which included publications, grants and citations. The other four themes – living a balanced life, making a difference, labour of love and freedom and flexibility – offered more subjective views of success. These included: research making a contribution to society, undertaking research they are passionate about, having autonomy in their role and achieving work-life balance.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that women define success in broader terms than neo-liberal universities, and future studies should consider these divergent definitions. Universities committed to equality should understand differences in how women may approach career progress and incorporate this into support processes and in alignment of individual and university goals.

Originality/value

This research offers unique insights into the experience of post-doctoral employment for women in the academic environment and the factors influencing their success in this early career phase.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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