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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Kara Kennedy and Stephan McAlpine

Previous difficulties were identified with the evaluation of violence interventions, resulting in gaps in the literature regarding the effectiveness of violence…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous difficulties were identified with the evaluation of violence interventions, resulting in gaps in the literature regarding the effectiveness of violence interventions. This study aims to contribute towards addressing the gap in the evaluation of violence interventions, by exploring the experience of prisoners who completed the self-change programme (SCP) during a 24-month period in HMP Shotts.

Design/methodology/approach

Five prisoners who completed the SCP at HMP Shotts were interviewed via a semi-structured interview to explore their experiences of engaging with this violence intervention. The data was analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), allowing the exploration and understanding of the subjective meanings of the experiences from the individual participants.

Findings

Interpretation of the data resulted in the identification of three superordinate themes that were relevant to participant experience: change as a process, supportive group environment and perceived outcomes.

Practical implications

These findings provide insight into prisoner experiences on SCP and contribute towards the evaluation of violence interventions. As prison-based interventions undergo a process of continued evaluation and re-accreditation, it is useful to understand the programme processes that enhance participant engagement and their learning experience, while also understanding the processes that may impede participant engagement and successful completion of violence interventions.

Originality/value

Although there has been substantial research conducted on violence interventions, this research has aimed to address some of the gaps and previous difficulties experienced within the evaluation of violence interventions.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Kirsty Penrice, Philip Birch and Stephan McAlpine

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motives a person adopts in order to engage in hate-related behaviours within a prison setting. A subsidiary aim of the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motives a person adopts in order to engage in hate-related behaviours within a prison setting. A subsidiary aim of the study was to compare this cohort of prisoners with prisoners who have been convicted for aggravated racism in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to gather data, an exploratory research design was adopted, utilising the method of semi-structured interviews. In total, a number of nine interviews were conducted. Qualitative analysis was then employed allowing for an examination of meaning in relation to the motives behind the commission of hate crimes to occur.

Findings

The findings revealed the presence of racist beliefs and attitudes in both groups involved in the study. Further similarities between the two groups included the perception of inequality and beliefs about racism. The differences between the two groups included poor emotional regulation and an inability to manage beliefs and subsequent behaviours about people from different ethnic groups, with those in custody seeming to be more reactive.

Practical implications

The findings provide a preliminary insight into enhancing inmate safety. The environmental implications begin to reveal the complexity of hate-related behaviours in custody. There are differences between the context of hate crime committed in a prison environment compared to that committed in the community that require different solutions for addressing such behaviour. Further implications are considered in the final section of the paper.

Originality/value

A large body of research has been conducted on prison violence, seldom does this research examine this issue within the context of hate crime. This preliminary study offers an insight into prison-based hate crime.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Christos Petichakis, Eli Saetnan and Lynn Clark

The purpose of this study is to examine the lived experiences of current or recent research fellows holding a prestigious research fellowship, and are based in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the lived experiences of current or recent research fellows holding a prestigious research fellowship, and are based in a research-intensive university in the UK. The authors of this study explored the challenges and opportunities that come with the transition of these individuals from a postdoctoral position to a fellowship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative research method and through semi-structured interviews with a purposively selected sample, this research attempts to interpret the lived experiences of four research fellows by making sense of their narratives and reflections on their roles through their career development and the pursuit of research independence in their field.

Findings

Three themes were identified following the analysis of the data collected, namely, the freedom to explore, managing relationships and serendipity. The emphasis on achieving research independence, with the first signs of independence appearing from their postdoctoral years, was stated as an important factor in the career development of the research fellow. Gaining legitimacy and membership to multiple communities of practice simultaneously appeared to be a productive yet challenging developmental experience.

Originality/value

While attention in recently published output has been given to the professional development of research students and postdoctoral staff, exploring the views of research fellows remains an under-researched area in the field of researcher development. This qualitative study aims to start a discussion by exploring the lived experiences of this select group as they explain their identity-trajectory in research and pursue their aspirations towards achieving an academic post.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Aliya Kuzhabekova and Dinara Mukhamejanova

This study aims to explore how some researchers become successful in the research context of a transitional country despite the resource- and training-related limitations…

1241

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how some researchers become successful in the research context of a transitional country despite the resource- and training-related limitations imposed by an immature research system.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses Unger’s ideas within agency theory, specifically, his concepts of “negative capability” and “formative context” as its framework. The study adopts a descriptive qualitative approach, whereby the data collected from 19 in-depth interviews with successful researchers from various universities of Kazakhstan is analyzed using emergent thematic coding.

Findings

The study findings are consistent with Unger’s agency theory. The theory predicts that researchers can achieve their goals by adapting to the constrained context and can take steps to transform the context in desirable ways. Specifically, the Kazakhstani researchers have successfully adapted the Soviet mechanism of research schools to the new realities by “exploiting” a recently introduced government-funded mobility program for doctoral students for their own purposes. This mechanism is conductive to junior researchers’ capacity building, as well as to increasing the productivity of the leading researchers and their research teams.

Originality/value

The contribution of the study consists in the fact that it explores the process of researcher development, more specifically, individual level research capacity building in the context of a transitional post-Soviet country. The study pays special attention to the role of international mobility and research schools in the development of research skills. The conclusions of the paper are of interest to the scholars of researcher development in general and to the specialists in individual research capacity building in Eurasia in particular.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Abstract

Details

Developing and Supporting Multiculturalism and Leadership Development: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-460-6

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Maura Borrego, David B. Knight and Nathan Hyungsok Choe

The purpose of this study is to better understand the nature of graduate training experiences in research groups and to identify factors that may lead to increased student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to better understand the nature of graduate training experiences in research groups and to identify factors that may lead to increased student retention and success.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys administered at four US universities resulted in quantitative responses from 130 Master’s and 702 doctoral engineering students participating in graduate research groups. Missing data were imputed, and responses were weighted by gender, discipline, degree program and nationality. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors describing research group experiences. Regression models were built for two outcomes: satisfaction with research group experience and intention to complete degree. Control variables included gender, discipline, degree program, nationality, year in program and institution.

Findings

Fifty-five per cent of the variance in satisfaction was described by a model including agency, support, international diversity and group climate. Sixty-five per cent of variance in intent to complete was described by a model comprising international diversity, agency and support. Several control variables were significant.

Originality/value

Agency and support in particular were the most influential predictors of both satisfaction and intention, suggesting that future efforts should emphasize stable funding, clear expectations, access to mentors and agency-building experiences to help students take an active role in their own success.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Kathleen Van Benthem, Mohamad Nadim Adi, Christopher T. Corkery, Jiro Inoue and Nafisa M. Jadavji

The postdoctoral position was originally created as a short training period for PhD holders on the path to becoming university professors; however, the single-purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The postdoctoral position was originally created as a short training period for PhD holders on the path to becoming university professors; however, the single-purpose paradigm of training has evolved considerably over time. The purpose of this paper is to report on the opportunities and challenges faced by postdocs as they navigate this complex training period.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand the changes in postdoctoral training the Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars – l’Association Canadienne des Stagiaires Postdoctoraux (CAPS-ACSP) conducted three professional national surveys of postdocs working in Canada and Canadian postdocs working internationally. Using the data from each survey, the authors investigated demographics, career goals and mental health and developed a theory-based path model for predicting postdoctoral training satisfaction, using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The analysis revealed that during their training postdocs face mental health symptoms, which play a role in job satisfaction. Additionally, predictors of satisfaction with career training were opportunities for skills development and encouragement from supervisors. Predictors of satisfaction with compensation were salary, skills training, mental health and encouragement from supervisors.

Originality/value

This first in-depth analysis of mental health symptoms illuminates the postdoc experience in academia. The study highlights the need for substantive changes to address the challenges facing postdoctoral training in the current research model in North America.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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