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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Stephan Baraldi, Magnus Sverke and Gary Chaison

The purpose of this paper is to examine a failed union merger attempt from a democratic perspective. Although it is estimated that a majority of planned union mergers are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a failed union merger attempt from a democratic perspective. Although it is estimated that a majority of planned union mergers are never completed, the existing literature is unsuccessful in explaining why it is so. Stressing the importance for merging unions to keep their members informed and participative in the merger process, we highlight two democratic aspects of merger implementation: information anchoring (i.e. the spreading of merger relevant information throughout the membership), and participatory union climate (i.e. the extent to which union leaders provide members with opportunities to participate in union activities and decision making). The act of voting for or against a merger proposal can be regarded as a manifestation of democratic aspects in the internal negotiation process. Thus, members' intention to vote for or against the merger proposal was also analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were sent to 1,000 members of each of the four participating unions. The survey investigated how many members knew of the merger negotiations, if they would have voted for or against the proposal, and also measured perceptions of the participatory union climate. Discrepancies between representatives and rank‐and‐file members were analyzed, with any significant differences between the two groups interpreted as indicative of the merger process lacking in internal democracy.

Findings

The results show that the merger plans were not sufficiently anchored among the membership and that there were significant differences between representatives and rank‐and‐file members in terms of merger plan awareness, vote intention, and perceptions of participatory union climate.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is based on cross‐sectional data collected after the planned merger was rejected.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated the internal merger negotiation process using an unsuccessful merger attempt as a study case. Also, the need for psychological approaches in IR has long been called for. The present study meets both of these criteria.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Antonella La Rocca

Abstract

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Roger Strange and Giovanna Magnani

Many manufacturing firms (e.g. Apple and Nike) now outsource some or all of their manufacturing activities to independent suppliers rather than continuing to undertake…

Abstract

Many manufacturing firms (e.g. Apple and Nike) now outsource some or all of their manufacturing activities to independent suppliers rather than continuing to undertake them in-house. Clearly these firms perceive this externalisation of production to be a performance-enhancing strategy, but what are the performance consequences in practice? In this chapter, we review and critique the extant academic literature on the performance consequences of manufacturing outsourcing, and note that the empirical findings have yielded mixed results. We argue that outsourcing has potential impacts upon a number of ‘performance’ outcomes, including inter alia financial performance, productivity/efficiency, sales/market share, costs of production, business performance and innovation. We further argue that many of the empirical studies have flawed designs, and make a series of methodological recommendations to guide future empirical work.

Details

Breaking up the Global Value Chain
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-071-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Abstract

Details

Creating and managing superior customer value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-173-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Arch G. Woodside, Francesca Golfetto and Michael Gibbert

This first paper examines total benefits and total costs of product–service designs as antecedents to customer value assessment. It introduces the reader to all the papers…

Abstract

This first paper examines total benefits and total costs of product–service designs as antecedents to customer value assessment. It introduces the reader to all the papers in this volume. The first half of the paper offers a model of customer value assessment. This section describes research studies in industrial marketing contexts that illustrate the core propositions in the model. The second half of the paper provides brief introductions to the papers in this volume; these papers offer further evidence supporting the view that discontinuous innovations offer superior customer value but customers tend to eventually become increasingly comfortable with the status quo and move away from adopting superior proven technologies. This paper advocates being mindful of the marketplace dynamics affecting value. The volume serves to increase knowledge and understanding of the dynamic forces affecting changes in customer value.

Details

Creating and managing superior customer value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-173-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Lu-Jui Chen and Hung-Tai Tsou

This study aims to discuss not only the relationship between performance and cooperation but also discusses whether a subsidiary should prioritize performance above…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss not only the relationship between performance and cooperation but also discusses whether a subsidiary should prioritize performance above cooperation or whether a subsidiary should prioritize cooperation above performance. In addition, because the headquarters-subsidiary relationship influences the subsidiaries, the perception gaps (PGs) between headquarters and subsidiaries are taken as moderators to explore when there are perception differences between headquarters and subsidiaries and the effect on the relationship between subsidiaries’ cooperation (SCO) and performance (SP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study obtained the data through a survey of 170 subsidiaries in China; chief executive officer or senior managers were selected as the data collection sources. AMOS analysis was used to address sophisticated data analysis issues.

Findings

The empirical evidence indicates that subsidiary capabilities have direct impacts on SCO and SP. In addition, SCO and performance have mediating effects. More specifically, SCO has a full mediating effect and SP has a partial mediating effect. For the moderating effects, the PG weakens the effect of SCO on SP.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on subsidiary capabilities by offering a headquarters-subsidiary relationship model. As both the conceptual and empirical research studies on this topic are still underdeveloped, the study provides fresh insights into collaborative management and offers significant theoretical and managerial implications. Specifically, this study focuses on the impacts that subsidiary capabilities and PG have on cooperation and performance.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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