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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Stella Korobili‐Xantinidou, Mersini Moreleli‐Cacouris and Irene Tilikidou

The rapid changes in the Greek Library scene in the last decade and the need for librarians to work in a more complex and demanding environment create responsibilities for…

Abstract

The rapid changes in the Greek Library scene in the last decade and the need for librarians to work in a more complex and demanding environment create responsibilities for library schools to design and implement new programmes, adopting a new learning theory. A literature review indicated constructivism as a theory that could be used to create a new educational environment that will allow student‐centered and collaborative learning, and facilitate interaction. In order to identify the competencies and skills required of library managers as perceived by practitioners, the authors conducted a survey. The population of the survey was the staff of Greek libraries, the data collection method was a census and the instrument was a structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, as well as ANOVA one‐way, Pearson’s parametric correlation and multiple regression were run to determine the present and needed managerial competencies and skills of Greek librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 104 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Stella Korobili, Aphrodite Malliari and George N. Christodoulou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate student information literacy skills in the Technological Education Institute (TEI) of Thessaloniki, Greece, and examine whether…

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1551

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate student information literacy skills in the Technological Education Institute (TEI) of Thessaloniki, Greece, and examine whether courses and/or library seminars make any difference and contribute to the development of information literacy skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey is conduct with students from all the departments of TEI that are enrolled at the sixth or seventh semester of their studies. The instrument of the survey is a structured questionnaire that included 12 questions, and measured a total of 73 variables.

Findings

A significant percentage of the students have not completed an assignment in the previous semester, are not acquainted with the scientific sources available in the library, and have not attended an information literacy course and/or a library seminar. However, there is a slight difference between those respondents who have “attended an IL course integrated in the curriculum” and those who have not.

Originality/value

The approaches described here may be helpful to librarians when they prepare guidelines for a program that assesses the level of students with regard to information literacy skills.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Stella Korobili, Aphrodite Malliari and George Christodoulou

The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of Greek librarians regarding information literacy programs and their preparedness for such programs.

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1808

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of Greek librarians regarding information literacy programs and their preparedness for such programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was targeted at all professional and paraprofessional staff of the academic libraries in Greece and Cyprus. The instrument was a specially designed structured questionnaire which included 20 questions, in sum 67 variables.

Findings

Most libraries do not deliver information literacy programs, but some kind of library instruction. Many respondents consider that more money, more librarians and an appropriately equipped space are the best ways to improve information literacy programs. Concerning the information literacy trainers, there are those who emphasize teaching abilities and/or pedagogical experience, and those who emphasize infrastructure and funding.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing knowledge of information literacy skills by revealing certain issues regarding the academic libraries in Greece and Cyprus.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Afrodite Malliari, Stella Korobili and Aspasia Togia

The purpose of the present study was to expand the knowledge of student computer competencies and IT self‐efficacy in two LIS departments in Greece.

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1319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study was to expand the knowledge of student computer competencies and IT self‐efficacy in two LIS departments in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in the study were students in the two LIS departments of the Technological Educational Institutes (TEI) situated in Thessaloniki and Athens, Greece. The survey was addressed to sophomores, juniors and seniors, because IT courses are taught after the first year of study. The instrument of the survey was a structured questionnaire comprising three parts, measuring a total of 48 variables.

Findings

The levels of students' IT self‐efficacy is rather high, while the mean score of computer competence indicates a rather low level of perceived ability in using computers. Students were more competent in using e‐mail and Facebook, as well as using the internet for personal purposes. IT self‐efficacy and perceived computer competence were positively related to the frequency of use of certain electronic activities and previous PC/internet experience. In addition, the frequency of IT use was a strong predictor of IT self‐efficacy, and both frequency of use and experience were predictors of computer competence. The findings also suggested that increased levels of self‐efficacy and computer competence were associated with higher grades.

Originality/value

By being aware of the factors that predict self‐efficacy and perceived ability, educators in both LIS departments can design instruction or other interventions in a way that will boost self‐efficacy beliefs. Such an approach is likely to increase the acceptance and use of IT and help LIS students meet the learning objectives of IT courses.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Stella Korobili and Irene Tilikidou

To provide reliable data for the development of efficient information literacy education in a department of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece. It…

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1376

Abstract

Purpose

To provide reliable data for the development of efficient information literacy education in a department of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece. It requires in‐depth understanding of the current situation as well as future expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research objectives were set. One was to record the use of resources by students and their perceptions, as well as the expectations of faculty regarding information literacy skills. The other was to examine the preferences of students and faculty regarding information literacy education. Two surveys were conducted among both students (cluster sampling) and faculty (census) by the utilization of relative structured questionnaire.

Findings

The project reveals that the percentage of students who use the e‐resources of the library is relatively low, and that the few students who attended the bibliographic instruction seminar use the e‐resources more for the completion of their assignments. Also faculty were found to do very little in class to motivate students to use library sources for completing long research papers. With reference to students' and faculty's preferences concerning future information literacy education, it was indicated that the greatest percentage prefer instruction at user's request, and a course integrated into the curriculum. Focusing on a course integrated in the curriculum, it is suggested that it is provided at the first or second semester of their studies, to be developed on the basis of librarian/faculty cooperation and supported by demonstration of resources and/or hands‐on workshops.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to fill the gaps left in understanding faculty attitudes toward information literacy. Also duplicating this survey in other departments of Technological Educational Institution could provide a picture of the kind of information literacy education a Greek institution should apply.

Practical implications

This research implies the need for developing a course integrated into the curriculum tailored to the interests of the students, designed to develop critical thinking skills. It is suggested that this course should be provided at an appropriate time that would allow students to acknowledge its relevance to course content. A multimedia product is suggested as a handbook to this course.

Originality/value

This research tries to fill a gap in the published literature which does not offer any surveys in Greek academic institutions about perceptions and practices of faculty and students regarding information literacy programs.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Stella Korobili, Irene Tilikidou and Antonia Delistavrou

To examine the use of library resources, focusing on e‐sources, by the members of the faculty of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece; to reveal the…

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4287

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the use of library resources, focusing on e‐sources, by the members of the faculty of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece; to reveal the factors which influence the effective use of sources for academic duties; and to provide reliable information to both the administration and the library of the institute, with the aim of the improvement of library services.

Design/methodology/approach

A census survey, using a structured questionnaire, among the faculty of the Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki was conducted to examine the frequency of use of resources, mainly e‐sources, and to reveal the impact of demographic or academic situational characteristics, the assumed positive influence of academic productivity, perceived usefulness of resources and access to e‐sources on the use of e‐sources as well as the assumed negative influence of barriers and computer anxiety on the use of e‐sources.

Findings

The great majority of the faculty of TEI uses printed sources more than e‐sources, but they also use e‐sources quite frequently. Use is mostly of books, websites and printed journals. It was also found that the use of e‐sources is higher in the School of Business Administration and Economics among those who hold a PhD degree and among younger members of the faculty. Also, the results indicated that the use of e‐sources is positively influenced by the respondents' perceived usefulness of resources, the convenience of access to the sources and their academic productivity. The examination of the computer anxiety rating scale (CARS) provided evidence that the less anxious the faculty feel about PCs, the more frequent users they become.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to measure how faculty interact with information, what kind of electronic sources they prefer, what search strategies they use, as well as whether their information needs are satisfied. This research needs to be duplicated to other universities in Greece to determine whether the results can be generalized for Greek academic faculty.

Practical implications

University administrations need to improve library facilities, to include more workstations for access to electronic sources, as well as to improve the marketing and communication of these e‐sources.

Originality/value

This research tries to fill a gap in the literature, which has underemphasized so far the need for assessing and measuring the use of library resources in Greek academic libraries and the examination of the factors that influence this use.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Aspasia Togia, Stella Korobili and Afrodite Malliari

The purpose of this paper is to give an insight to the motivation processes and learning strategies of the students of the Library and Information Systems (LIS) Department…

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3751

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an insight to the motivation processes and learning strategies of the students of the Library and Information Systems (LIS) Department of Alexander Technological Educational Institute (ATEI), Thessaloniki, in courses encompassing Information Technology (IT).

Design/methodology/approach

The students participated in the study between the 10th and 12th week of a 13‐week semester. Data were collected with the Science Motivation Questionnaire (SMQ) and the Self‐Regulated Learning Strategies component of the Motivational Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Independent samples t‐tests were used to indicate any associations between motivation to learn and learning strategies, with students' background characteristics. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict students' levels of motivation from the background characteristics, and their intention to continue their studies and to work as librarians/information professionals.

Findings

Results showed that participants reported relatively increased levels of motivation and employment of effective learning strategies. Participants' intention to continue their studies in library/information science emerged as the only variable that significantly contributed to the equation for predicting self‐regulated learning from the whole set of predictors and also to the prediction of motivation to learn.

Research limitations/implications

The SMQ was originally designed for science courses and the use of the translated and slightly modified version did not seem to be very sensitive in the IT learning context. A follow up study with different methodologies, would add to the weight of the present findings. In addition, future studies could focus on the particular factors that motivate students to learn IT and to achieve the learning objectives of the IT courses.

Practical implications

The intended outcome of this survey was to provide LIS students and instructors with an assessing tool to evaluate motivation to learn IT and the effectiveness of the strategies employed in the process of acquiring knowledge and skills. Based on the results, faculty members can provide learning environments that promote motivation towards learning and encourage students to select and use more advanced and effective learning strategies. In addition, the results of the study provide an additional argument for organizing a postgraduate program at the LIS Department of ATEI, Thessaloniki.

Originality/value

Empirical research on learning attitudes of LIS students is limited. Moreover, motivation and learning strategies use have never been studied in the Greek context of library education, although IT literacy is an essential task and all LIS Departments' instructors share the important goal of fostering students' motivation to learn IT.

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