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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Stefano Rigotti and Leyland Pitt

Student evaluation of the education they receive has long been an area of concern to academics and institutions. A recent paper identified more than 1300 articles and…

Abstract

Student evaluation of the education they receive has long been an area of concern to academics and institutions. A recent paper identified more than 1300 articles and books dealing with research on student ratings of teaching [Cashin 1990]. Most tertiary institutions require it of their academic staff to evaluate their teaching. Most serious teachers have recognised evaluation's importance in being able to assess the quality of the product they deliver, to manage it, and to improve it. Yet there is certainly no standard approach to the evaluation of the education quality, and this would be particularly true of schools of management and business. Management teachers and also institutions, would probably admit to being frustrated at some time or another in their efforts to assess the quality of the education and related services they provide. In 1983 Lovelock identified part of the problem in service organisations as being related to inbreeding: “… Most hoteliers have grown up in the hotel industry. And most hospital and college administrators have remained within the confines of health care, or higher education, respectively” [Lovelock 1983]. Such relatively constrained exposure reduces the objectivity in determining service requirements and sensitivity to the external influences setting them. It is plausible that managers of institutions of higher management rationalise their attitudes towards the quality of service [as opposed to education the product] as follows: “MBAs expect things to be tough”; or, “Executives like to get ‘back to boarding school or residence’, it makes them feel young again/like real students again/like they're in a real learning environment.”

Details

Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Rita Chiesa, Stefano Toderi, Paola Dordoni, Kene Henkens, Elena Maria Fiabane and Ilaria Setti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens’s (2005) age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively, under 50 and 50 years and older. Then, the moderator role of age groups in the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey involved a large sample of 4,667 Italian bank sector’s employees.

Findings

The results show the invariance of the three dimensional structure of organizational stereotypes towards older workers scale: productivity, reliability and adaptability. Furthermore, the moderation is confirmed: the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is significant only for older respondents.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should aim to replicate the findings with longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

The study suggests the importance to emphasize the positive characteristics of older workers and to reduce the presence of negative age stereotypes in the workplace, especially in order to foster the occupational self-efficacy of older workers.

Originality/value

The findings are especially relevant in view of the lack of evidence about the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Angelina Zubac, Marie Dasborough, Kate Hughes, Zhou Jiang, Shelley Kirkpatrick, Maris G. Martinsons, Danielle Tucker and Ofer Zwikael

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be…

Abstract

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be successfully implemented and organizations effectively changed. The ten papers selected for this special issue reflect a range of scholarly traditions and, thus, as our review and integration of the relevant literatures, and our introductions to the ten papers demonstrate, they shed light on the strategy and change interface in starkly different ways. Collectively, the papers give us more insight into the recursive activities, and structural, organizational learning and cognitive mechanisms that are encouraged or deliberately established at organizations to allow their people to successfully implement a strategy and effect change, including achieve greater levels of horizontal alignment. Moreover, they demonstrate the benefits associated with establishing platforms and/or routines designed to overcome decision-makers’ cognitive shortcomings while implementing a strategy or making timely adjustments to it. We conclude our editorial by identifying some yet unanswered questions.

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