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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2019

Bernard Cova, Per Skålén and Stefano Pace

Project marketing is the specific activity of companies selling projects-to-order. Interpersonal practice is known to be important in this type of marketing. While this…

Abstract

Purpose

Project marketing is the specific activity of companies selling projects-to-order. Interpersonal practice is known to be important in this type of marketing. While this interpersonal practice has been little studied, some previous research suggests that changes in the institutional macro environment have affected it. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to study today’s interpersonal practice in project business and how the institutional environment conditions it.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with marketing managers at project-based firms in different business sectors in France and Sweden. Data collection and analysis was informed by grounded theory.

Findings

The paper identifies three types of interpersonal practice in project marketing, referred to as the transactional, the work-based and the socializing. Changes in these are explained in relation to the three institutional logics identified in the data: the market institutional logic of business ethics, the corporate institutional logic of rationalization and the family institutional logic of gender equality.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies can continue and broaden this work as it regards how the institutional conditioning of interpersonal practice varies with context.

Practical implications

By clearly categorizing the three types of interpersonal practice and their relative role today, companies can orient the activities of salespeople, business developers and other project marketers.

Social implications

The paper highlights how business ethics and gender equality have changed interpersonal practices in project marketing.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the current debate on project marketing by identifying three types of interpersonal practice and by illustrating how institutional logics condition and change these. The paper shows that extra-business activities are needed less than previous research has argued with regard to maintaining customer relationships in-between projects.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

P. Matthyssens, A.H. Kirca and S. Pace

The aim of the “viewpoint” part of this paper is to enhance discussion on the challenges global business‐to‐business (B2B) marketing is facing. More specifically…

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6371

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the “viewpoint” part of this paper is to enhance discussion on the challenges global business‐to‐business (B2B) marketing is facing. More specifically, academics are stimulated to study the impact of these trends on the internationalization of B2B companies. Managers are urged to engage in open strategy conversations on the consequent opportunities and threats for their global market strategy. Further, this paper acts as a “Guest editorial” for a special issue on B2B and international business.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature screening of key contributions highlighting B2B marketing trends on the one hand and theoretical underpinnings of IB on the other. Starting from a practitioner perspective, the paper gradually introduces a discussion on the potential theoretical implications and on cross‐fertilization possibilities when merging recent developments in B2B with theory and concepts from international business.

Findings

B2B and IB go hand in hand and the actual challenges that business marketers encounter require critical revisions of core concepts and foundations of internationalization theories.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies trends based on secondary data. They are exemplary and not exhaustive. Future research will have to empirically “test” these assertions.

Practical implications

As a result of this paper, practitioners might question their internationalization or globalization approach.

Originality/value

The value of the first part of the paper lies in the intended stimulus of academic and practitioner discussion. The second part draws attention on the special issue papers and their main messages.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Giuseppe Timperio, Kay Chuan Tan, Luciano Fratocchi and Stefano Pace

This study investigates Singaporean millennials’ attitudes toward luxury brands. The research focuses on the financial, functional, individual, and social dimensions of…

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2237

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates Singaporean millennials’ attitudes toward luxury brands. The research focuses on the financial, functional, individual, and social dimensions of luxury value perception and whether ethnicity influences these dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research measures luxury value perception among millennials of the three main ethnic groups in Singapore (Chinese, Indians, and Malays) via more than 200 questionnaires. Data were analyzed through Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric ANOVA and cluster analysis.

Findings

Luxury value perception does not vary across ethnicity, with the exception of the financial value dimension. Four market segments of young luxury consumers in Singapore are identified and profiled. These segments do not differ in terms of ethnicity.

Research limitations/implications

Millennials are an evolving and moving population segment, and thus longitudinal analyses would be useful to develop a more comprehensive understanding of this segment.

Practical implications

Ethnicity does not affect luxury value perception. The results of the cluster analysis suggest that luxury companies should address the millennials as a global target sharing the same luxury value perception. At the same time, luxury companies can emphasize some different aspects (i.e., the financial dimension) of their value offer.

Originality/value

The research studies the most interesting market for luxury brands—millennials—in a fast-growing luxury market. It adds knowledge to the previous literature on luxury value perception. This research can guide managers to devise suitable marketing strategies addressing the millennials segment as a global market that has the same set of luxury values worldwide.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Carl Arthur Solberg and François Durrieu

The purpose of this paper is to seek answers to the question of the impact of different classes of strategy (generic and international) on firm performance in…

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7916

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek answers to the question of the impact of different classes of strategy (generic and international) on firm performance in international markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey of 213 British SME exporters, using EQS.

Findings

The paper concludes that Porter's generic strategies have both a direct and an indirect impact through international marketing strategies on firm performance, and that the combined impact of the two levels yields better returns than either of them individually. Furthermore, it questions the wisdom of a stepwise approach to international markets and highlights the importance of a challenger strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to British SMEs and needs to be supplemented by research from other countries. Also, it explores the effect of only a limited number of confirmed international marketing strategies, excluding for instance the standardisation construct – a key construct in international marketing.

Practical implications

Managers may derive guidance in their planning by applying the model and the findings in their own deliberations.

Originality/value

Little agreement has been reached as to the impact of different international marketing strategies, let alone the classification of strategies themselves. This paper analyses firm strategy in two levels – generic strategies and five groups of international marketing strategies.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Stefano Pace

The aim of the paper is to discuss a possible extension of narrative analysis to a new medium of expression of consumer behaviour, specifically YouTube.

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11699

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to discuss a possible extension of narrative analysis to a new medium of expression of consumer behaviour, specifically YouTube.

Design/methodology/approach

Marketing and consumer behaviour studies often apply narrative analysis to understand consumption. The consumer is a source of introspective narratives that are studied by scholars. However, consumption has a narrative nature in itself and consumers are also storytellers. YouTube is a new context in which subjects tell stories to an audience through self‐made videos and re‐edited TV programs. After defining the pros and cons of different approaches to the study of YouTube, narrative analysis is presented as a possible means of understanding YouTube.

Findings

Some preliminary evidence is presented by discussing several YouTube videos. These indicate that YouTube content can be better understood as stories, rather than example of other approaches, such as visual analysis, media studies, videography, and others.

Research limitations/implications

From the analysis conducted, preliminary managerial implications can be drawn. It seems unlikely that normal TV broadcasters will be substituted by YouTube videos. For the most part, YouTube content draws its sense and shared meaning from the major TV shows and series. The discursive nature of YouTube is also an indication of how to deal with this new medium as a company or researcher.

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to open up new applications of interpretive market research in the form of narrative analysis. It explores a new context that is gaining relevance in both the marketing literature and managerial practice.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Abstract

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-907-8

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Anna Fyrberg-Yngfalk, Bernard Cova, Stefano Pace and Per Skålén

Confessions are said to be important for members’ tribal experiences and they are usually ascribed religious meanings in existing research on consumer tribes. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Confessions are said to be important for members’ tribal experiences and they are usually ascribed religious meanings in existing research on consumer tribes. This suggests that confessions have a regulative role for tribal life. By employing the Foucauldian notion of pastoral power, the present study explores confession practices and examines how control is manifested.

Methodology

The study is based on a netnographic study and analysis of tribal members’ confessions across three online consumer tribes devoted to opera (Loggionisti, who are opera aficionados of the La Scala theatre in Milan, Italy), sports (football and hockey fans of Djurgården, Sweden), and cars (Alfa Romeo owners).

Findings

We demonstrate how confessions align consumers with the common tribe ethos and how this constitutes members into various subject positions, which are fundamental social processes for reinforcing the tribe. More specifically, it demonstrates four types of subject positions: the ‘pastor’, ‘regular sheep’, ‘good sheep’ and ‘black sheep’, and how these subject positions regulate the actions of tribe members.

Research implications

The present study theorizes how control is manifested and facilitated in consumer tribes. The study also explicates the confession and its role as a religious regulating practice fundamental for the life of a consumer tribe.

Practical implications

Community managers can recognize the different subject positions that emerge within a community and help facilitate the interactions among community members.

Originality/value of chapter

Previous studies are silent about how confessions reproduce control in consumer tribes. The present study highlights confession practices and the constitution of subject positions, which regulate as well as reinforce consumer tribes.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-811-2

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Silvia Biraghi, Rossella C. Gambetti and Stefano Pace

Purpose: This study explores how the interplay between a passionate consumer and his embeddedness in the lively network of a consumer tribe represents a fertile…

Abstract

Purpose: This study explores how the interplay between a passionate consumer and his embeddedness in the lively network of a consumer tribe represents a fertile environment for the emergence of an entrepreneurial venture that is able to combine micro- and macro-level concerns bridging tribe and marketplace needs.

Design/methodology/approach: The research, set within the context of an exemplar consumer’s entrepreneurial project, was conducted following a netnographic methodological approach.

Findings: By fluidly moving from within to outside the tribe in the wider marketplace, the entrepreneur crafts his own new space in the market through a cultural mediation work that effectively combines the affective, immaterial labor characterizing the social glue of the tribe collective ethos with entrepreneurial spirit and sharp marketing and consumer insight abilities. The entrepreneur acts as a resource integrator of traditional firm-driven and emerging consumer-driven marketplace without opposing existing market structures, but rather valorizing them through his intermediation work.

Research limitations: This is a single-case study that, although exemplar, needs to be expanded and consolidated with further empirical evidence.

Originality/value: The study contributes to extant literature on consumer-driven market emergence and new market system dynamics by uncovering the role of consumer entrepreneur as a reconfigurator of the existing market resources.

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Øystein Moen, Tage Koed Madsen and Arild Aspelund

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the actual use and market performance effects of information and communication technologies (ICT) with regard…

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6884

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the actual use and market performance effects of information and communication technologies (ICT) with regard to international business‐to‐business marketing activities of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on survey data from 635 Danish and Norwegian SMEs with international marketing activities. The two primary research questions regarding actual use and performance effects are addressed by descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling, respectively.

Findings

Findings suggest that, contrary to expectation, Norwegian and Danish international SMEs are not heavy users of ICT. Rather, ICT is predominantly used for market information search and to develop long‐term customer relationships. In both those areas the use of ICT is positively associated with the firm's satisfaction with its development of new market knowledge. The use of ICT for sales purposes is limited and apparently negatively associated with the firm's satisfaction with its development of new market knowledge. There is no significant association between the use of ICT and the firm's satisfaction with its international performance.

Practical implications

This study contributes with new knowledge regarding the potential and limitations of the use of ICT in international business‐to‐business marketing. Heavy usage of ICT seems to be primarily directed towards information search and relationship development. The study also supports that ICT usage have positive impact on the accumulation of new market knowledge (and indirectly on international performance). Use of ICT for sales activities seems to be quite limited, and perhaps not even advisable. The reason for this may be that media richness associated with face‐to‐face interaction is beneficial for establishment of commitment and trust.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to the field of knowledge regarding the potential (and limitations) of ICT in international business‐to‐business marketing.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Bernard Cova, Stefano Pace and David J. Park

The “brand community” concept believes that the meaning of the brand transcends national boundaries. However, such an assumption presents challenges arising out of several…

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6900

Abstract

Purpose

The “brand community” concept believes that the meaning of the brand transcends national boundaries. However, such an assumption presents challenges arising out of several reasons including co‐existence of sub‐tribes within a given brand community that allocate different meanings to a particular brand. This plurality of meanings seems exacerbated for global brands where meanings are shaped by tremendously varying cultures. Aims to address the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This text relies on a comparative study of the meanings attributed to one particular global brand, Warhammer, by the members of its brand community in France and the USA.

Findings

Findings highlight the elements of homogeneity and heterogeneity that reside in the cross‐border meanings of the brand. The authors also discuss the marketplace relevance arising out of this plurality that should be taken into account by global marketers.

Originality/value

The present text argues that community attached to a global brand constitutes a complex phenomenon, one that both integrates and ignores geographical considerations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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