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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Sukhada Khedkar, Stefano Ciliberti and Stefanie Bröring

One of the objectives of the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 (NHCR) is protection and promotion of innovation in the food industry. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the objectives of the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 (NHCR) is protection and promotion of innovation in the food industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the NHCR on both innovation and the sourcing of external knowledge in the European Union (EU) food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted which resulted in a sample of 105 EU companies for the study. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the nature of relationships that existed among the challenges related to the implementation of the NHCR, external sources of knowledge and innovation.

Findings

Challenges related to the NHCR are currently found to have a negative direct impact on product innovation. However, they have a positive indirect effect on product innovation, especially in the case of small and medium-sized enterprises. They also seem to positively affect external knowledge sourcing. Additionally, sources of external knowledge are found to have a positive effect on product and process innovations.

Practical implications

This study provides insights to different stakeholders in the food industry who might wish to work jointly and address the various issues related to the requirements of the NHCR and facilitate compliance with the regulation.

Originality/value

Understanding the impact of the NHCR on innovation seems pivotal because innovation plays an important role in the EU food sector. To this purpose, the paper delivers insights into some main compliance challenges and their effect on innovation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Stefano Ciliberti, Laura Carraresi and Stefanie Bröring

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how internal and external drivers affect innovation in the Italian food industry. Second, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how internal and external drivers affect innovation in the Italian food industry. Second, the authors are interested to understand to what extent these drivers are industry specific, and therefore, they are contrasted against those relevant for the pharmaceutical industry in Italy according to the increasing growth of cross-industry innovation between these two sectors. The paper aims, thus, to shed light on the differences between food and pharmaceutical industries in terms of innovation drivers to understand potential precursors of emerging industry convergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Both probit and bivariate probit models are estimated, using data from the Italian Community Innovation Survey, in order to provide empirical evidence on drivers affecting innovation in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

Findings

The innovation activity of Italian food and pharmaceutical companies strongly relies on the presence of in-house R & D activities. Whereas firms in the pharmaceutical industry combine both internal and external R & D activities and knowledge sources to produce innovation, the case of the food industry is strongly dependent on the acquisition of external technology. In particular, the increased need for absorptive capacity of both sectors emphasises the key role of university research for collaboration, knowledge transfer and product innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper gives insights not only on drivers for innovation, but especially on the industry-specific differences which should be taken into account to have a contingent view. Limitations concern the impossibility to perform panel data analysis, due to the design of the database. Furthermore, both food and pharmaceutical sub-samples are not completely representative, since large companies tend to be overrepresented.

Practical implications

This paper provides managerial insights concerning the internal and external drivers affecting innovation. Moreover, it raises awareness as regards the possible differences between the food and pharmaceutical industries, which is crucial for establishing successful pathways for cross-industry innovation.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the few attempts to compare the innovation drivers of two manufacturing sectors (food and pharmaceutical), increasingly involved in cross-industry collaborations, and to highlight the industry-specific differences in those drivers which can act as forerunners of this phenomenon.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Stefanie Bröring and L. Martin Cloutier

This paper seeks to shed some light on value‐creation in new product development (NPD) projects within the context of industry convergence and to explore alternative types…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to shed some light on value‐creation in new product development (NPD) projects within the context of industry convergence and to explore alternative types of projects characterised by different buyer‐seller relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

There has been much research on value‐creation in general, but limited emphasis on value‐creation in NPD projects addressing new industry segments emerging from industry convergence (for example, the segment of nuctraceuticals and functional foods (NFF) products that is positioned between the food and the pharmaceutical industries). Based on a multi‐case study approach, this paper pursues an exploratory research strategy and investigates 54 NPD projects drawn from a Quebec (Canada) NFF foods cluster.

Findings

In the context of convergence a new value chain is emerging between two formerly separated sectors. Value‐creation networks spread across industries and reinforce trends of convergence. Firms face competence gaps in NPD and seek to close these by choosing alternative forms of collaboration. Different types of NPD projects involve alternative forms of buyer‐seller relationships and their approach of value‐creation is analysed.

Research limitations/implications

A typology of different approaches to NPD in converging value chains is presented along with type‐specific implications for value‐creation for the required buyer‐seller relationship.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique insight into value‐creation in NPD in the emerging NFF sector, in particular, and for converging industries, in general.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Stefanie Bröring and Philipp Herzog

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different organisational tools of business development used in practice. This analysis seeks to address the question of how an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different organisational tools of business development used in practice. This analysis seeks to address the question of how an organisation can achieve the recurring shift from exploration to exploitation and at the same time manage to balance its open and closed innovation tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical basis for analysing the organisational implications of open vs closed innovation is built by Creavis, the business venturing arm of Degussa AG, a specialty chemicals company headquartered in Germany.

Findings

Companies face the ambiguity of creating new business options and exploiting these at a later stage. Since exploitative and explorative units require a different organisational set‐up, it is difficult for a company to shift its exploratory endeavours to exploitative means. The presented case study offers an answer to this dilemma by showing how organisations manage to combine both by a unique organisational set‐up allowing for an evolutionary approach of shifting exploratory work into exploitative results.

Practical implications

The insights derived from the case study clearly present a way of dealing with ambidexterity in new business development. The in‐depth analysis advances the understanding of how organisations may successfully conduct business development and, in particular, which organisational tools they may use.

Originality/value

This paper is based on an original case study by the authors. It integrates management theory with a real life example to foster management research in new business development and the particular question of how to deal with the need of organisations to combine both exploratory and exploitative units and support their interaction as well as employing different approaches to innovation, i.e. open vs closed innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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