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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Thomas Andersson and Stefan Tengblad

The paper aims to identify and address matching problems in leader development and to propose how these problems can be dealt with.

596

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify and address matching problems in leader development and to propose how these problems can be dealt with.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous research, traditional leadership development (LD) is criticized and alternative approaches are suggested.

Findings

This research identifies two major matching problems in traditional LD – between participant and development effort and between development effort and realities of managerial work. A context-sensitive and emergent view of LD is suggested to address these matching problems.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates the need of leader development that is addressing the complex nature of managerial work in a more holistic way and to help participants to understand how such complexities can be dealt with.

Originality/value

An alternative view of leader development is identified. It matches managers’ diversities and the realities of managerial work better than traditional leader development does.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2023

Agneta Häll, Stefan Tengblad, Margareta Oudhuis and Lotta Dellve

The purpose of this paper is to critically study the implementation and contextualization of the human resource transformation (HRT) management model within the human resources…

1622

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically study the implementation and contextualization of the human resource transformation (HRT) management model within the human resources (HR) function of a global industrial company group.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study that includes two data collections.

Findings

Implementation of the HRT model led to tensions and conflicting interpretations of the mission of the HR function, and a “tug of war” about the distribution of work both within HR and between HR and line management. Splitting the HR function into three legs made the HR function's learning cycles more difficult. The corporate group had a decentralized and diverse business culture, and contextualization of the HRT model to this setting highlighted the model's embeddedness in the American business culture of centralization and standardization. Implementation of the model also entailed a transition from an employee to an employer perspective within HR.

Research limitations/implications

For an assessment of HR's total work other parts of the HRT model (Ulrich and Brockbank, 2005) need to be involved since HR professionals in the insourced or outsourced shared service center (SSC) and Center of Expertise (CoE) and the e-HR tools are equally important for executing the total HR's mission. Further studies of the problematic human resource business partner (HRBP) role are needed and also what the development of e-HR solutions means for the HR profession.

Practical implications

The authors argue for a continuous development of HR work, along with closer professional contact both with line managers (LMs) and within the HR function, for improved learning cycles and a need for contextualization when implementing management models.

Social implications

The paper discusses the HRT model's impact on HR practitioners’ and LMs’ work practice.

Originality/value

This article shows the need for contextualization when implementing management models. The lack of such contextualization led to severe tensions, and the intentions of an efficient and respected HR function were not achieved. The study contributes an evaluation of the tensions between HRT as a normative and standardized model in business settings accustomed to variety and decentralized decision-making.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2023

Jonas Fasth and Stefan Tengblad

This paper investigates the ways managing directors (MDs) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) involve employees in strategic conversations. The paper examines how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the ways managing directors (MDs) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) involve employees in strategic conversations. The paper examines how managers interact with employees in strategic conversations, and why the managers do so (or do not), to generate empirically grounded knowledge about the nature of internal openness in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a general inductive approach and is based on in-depth interviews with 60 Swedish MDs with development and growth ambitions.

Findings

The paper develops a model of employee involvement in strategic conversations based on the nature and intensity of the MD–employee interaction. A key finding is that SMEs exhibit wide variation in terms of employee involvement, from virtually no employee involvement to, in some cases, far-reaching company democracy. The reasons for this variation are complex, but personal preferences and company size are shown to have an impact, as does, to some degree, ownership structure. In contrast to existing research, the limitations and drawbacks of involving employees in strategic conversations are outlined.

Originality/value

The study provides important insight into MDs' views and practices of internal openness in strategic conversations in SMEs. A model of employee involvement in strategic processes is outlined, and potential limitations of internal openness are highlighted.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Petri Kajonius, Ali Kazemi and Stefan Tengblad

Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons’ satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons’ satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the implementation of user-oriented care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organizing principles and management climate characterizing successful elderly care.

Design/methodology/approach

The department in one highly ranked municipality was selected and compared with a more average municipality. On-site in-depth semi-structured interviews with department managers and participatory observations at managers’ meetings were conducted in both municipalities.

Findings

Results revealed three key principles for successful elderly care: organizing care from the viewpoint of the older person; recruiting and training competent and autonomous employees; instilling a vision for the mission that guides operations at all levels in the organization. Furthermore, using climate theory to interpret the empirical material, in the highly successful municipality the management climate was characterized by affective support and cognitive autonomy, in contrast to a more instrumental work climate primarily focusing on organizational structure and doing the right things characterizing the more average municipality.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that guiding organizing principles are intertwined with management climate and that there are multiple perspectives that must be considered by the management, that is, the views of the older persons, the co-workers and the mission. These results can guide future care quality developments, and increase the understanding of the importance of organizational climate at the senior management level.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Thomas Andersson and Stefan Tengblad

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how new public management (NPM) reform from the national level is implemented as practice in a local unit within the police sector in…

1970

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how new public management (NPM) reform from the national level is implemented as practice in a local unit within the police sector in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case‐study approach is applied using semi‐structured interviews, participant observations and analysis of documents.

Findings

The paper illustrates different kinds of resistance at the organizational level. The dominant form of resistance was found to be cultural distancing. The paper demonstrates a tendency among police officers to deal with a changing and more complex work context by embracing a traditional work role.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that reforms that add complexity may fail because of potential contradictions and the limited capacity and motivation of employees to deal with the complexity in the manner prescribed by NPM.

Practical implications

The paper shows that the popular trend to adopt multi‐dimensional forms of control (for instance the balanced‐scorecard approach) may fail if there is a lack of consensus about what goals and measurement are important and/or there is a lack of dialogue about how the new goals should be implemented in practice.

Originality/value

Research about NPM‐reforms in the police sector is rare. The original contribution of this paper is to study NPM‐reforms with a focus on the role of complexity in relation to resistance.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2016

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Anders Örtenblad and Anne Gimson

213

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

500

Abstract

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Sharon C. Bolton and Maeve Houlihan

The purpose of this short paper is to introduce the special issue and outline its major themes.

829

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this short paper is to introduce the special issue and outline its major themes.

Design/methodology/approach

The control‐resistance literatures are described, and the necessity for field‐led empirical accounts is amplified, as a precursor to introducing the contributions to this special issue.

Findings

Forms of control co‐mingle and the old imprints the new. Theories of control, resistance, agency and consent can most usefully be expanded by engaging with empirical accounts, resisting duality, and embracing multidimensionality.

Originality/value

This paper offers a review of the state of debate about control and resistance within organisation studies, and calls for field‐informed accounts and fresh perspectives.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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