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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Stefan Smolnik, Nils Urbach and Jerry L. Fjermestad

560

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Nils Urbach, Stefan Smolnik and Gerold Riempp

The overall purpose of this study is to inform practitioners about the levers for improving their employee portals.

1437

Abstract

Purpose

The overall purpose of this study is to inform practitioners about the levers for improving their employee portals.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors introduce a theoretical model that is based on the DeLone and McLean IS success model, which considers the specific requirements of employee portals. They tested the associations between their model's success dimensions by using more than 4,400 employees' responses, which were collected in 12 companies across different industries. They applied structural equation modeling to carry out the causal analysis. In addition, within a performance‐based analysis, they further investigated the success dimensions' improvement potentials.

Findings

The results of the causal analysis indicate that besides the factors contributing to the success of information systems (IS) in general, other success dimensions – like the quality of the collaboration and process support – have to be considered when aiming for a successful employee portal. The performance‐based analysis emphasizes the significance of collaboration quality to improve an employee portal and indentifies the respective fields of action.

Research limitations/implications

This paper's contribution to theory is the empirical validation of a model for investigating employee portal success. The performance‐based analysis further elaborates on the causal analysi's findings. The results advance theoretical development in the area of employee portals and serve as a basis for future research in this field.

Practical implications

This model offers a means for organizations to evaluate and predict the success of employee portals. The study's findings make it possible for practitioners to understand the levers with which to improve their employee portals and to prioritize their investments accordingly.

Originality/value

This study is among the first, which empirically validates a comprehensive success model for employee portals and highlights its practical usefulness by means of a performance‐based analysis.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Stefan Smolnik and Ingo Erdmann

Many of today's organizations already have a strong integration of groupware systems within their IT‐infrastructure. The shared databases of these groupware systems form…

1153

Abstract

Many of today's organizations already have a strong integration of groupware systems within their IT‐infrastructure. The shared databases of these groupware systems form organizational memories, which comprise the complete knowledge of an organization collected over the time of its existence. One key problem is how to find relevant knowledge or information in continuously growing and distributed organizational memories. In many cases, the basic functionalities and mechanisms of groupware systems are not sufficient to support users in finding required knowledge or information. Topic maps provide strong paradigms and concepts for the semantic structuring of link networks and therefore, they are a considerable solution for organizing and navigating large and, continuously growing organizational memories. The K‐Discovery project suggests applying topic maps to groupware systems to address the mentioned challenges. Thus, the K‐Discovery project introduces a conceptual framework, an architecture, and an implementation approach to create knowledge structures by generating topic maps from organizational memories and offers navigation tools to exploit the created structures.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Murray E. Jennex, Stefan Smolnik and David T. Croasdell

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

3061

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a consensus‐building approach to derive the definition. An expert panel was used to generate a list of possible KM success definitions. A survey was used to identify a likely definition from this list. A second survey was used to further refine the proposed KM success definition. Finally, analysis of the survey comments was used to finalize the proposed definition.

Findings

KM success is a multidimensional concept. It is defined by capturing the right knowledge, getting the right knowledge to the right user, and using this knowledge to improve organizational and/or individual performance. KM success is measured by means of the dimensions: impact on business processes, impact on strategy, leadership, and knowledge content.

Research limitations/implications

An additional survey should be performed that tests the constructs of the proposed KM success definition. Additionally, future research should focus on identifying a set of measures that can be used to measure KM success and determining whether KM and KM System (KMS), success are the same or different constructs.

Practical implications

The proposed definition of KM success provides practitioners with four dimensions that can be used to construct organization‐specific measures for indicating when their KM initiative is successful.

Originality/value

This is important, as the literature, while providing much support for identifying KM critical success factors, does not provide a definition of when KM can be considered successful. Knowing when a KM initiative is successful is important for organizations and practitioners.

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Frank Teuteberg, Martin Kluth, Frederik Ahlemann and Stefan Smolnik

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and evaluate the semantic process benchmarking concept.

1583

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and evaluate the semantic process benchmarking concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' approach includes the use of metamodels and ontologies, which make the process models syntactically and semantically comparable. Furthermore, a software prototype is presented to analyze and compare individual process models and their performance information. Thereafter, the technical, conceptual, and economic perspectives of the approach's evaluation are aligned with their respective outcomes.

Findings

The evaluation proves that this approach is generally suitable to generate novel and useful information on different process models and their performance within the same problem domain. However, the initial set‐up costs are high and will only pay off once process models are used regularly.

Practical implications

The proposed approach depends strongly on the availability of appropriate metrics and ontologies, as well as on the annotation of these ontologies to process models, which is a time‐consuming task. If large benchmarking clearing centers are established, the approach will be more cost‐effective. The developed SEMAT prototype, that demonstrates and proves the proposed approach's general viability, supports cost‐effective ontology engineering and annotation in the context of semantic process benchmarking initiatives.

Originality/value

To date, process benchmarking has primarily been a manual process. In this article, the authors suggest an approach that allows time‐consuming and costly process analysis to be partially automated, which makes the performance indicators, as well as qualitative differences between processes, apparent.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Paul Cragg and Annette Mills

The study aimed to focus on how well information technology (IT) was supporting business processes in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

2969

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to focus on how well information technology (IT) was supporting business processes in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data using a questionnaire that incorporated the 12 processes of the American Productivity and Quality Center's (APQC) process classification framework. Structured interviews were conducted with managers in 66 SMEs.

Findings

The data indicated the importance of each process and how well IT supported each process. The following two core business processes were identified as strategically most important: deliver products and services, and manage customer service. Although the evidence indicated that the most important business processes were supported at an acceptable level, IT support was found to be low for many business processes. IT support also varied considerably across the sample, indicating that some firms have much higher IT support for business processes than others.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that it used a new instrument. Also, all the firms were SMEs in one part of one country. The study created an instrument that can be used by managers as a diagnostic tool to help SMEs identify areas for business improvement.

Practical implications

The study indicates that the business process view provides a useful lens for studying IT support. There seems to be much potential for SMEs to improve their IT support for some business processes.

Originality/value

The focus on IT support for business processes is original, especially by examining support for the broad range of processes of the APQC's model.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Kenia Sousa, Hildeberto Mendonça, Amandine Lievyns and Jean Vanderdonckt

This paper aims to present a case study of the application of a methodology that represents an innovative strategy that integrates researches on interaction design and…

1929

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a case study of the application of a methodology that represents an innovative strategy that integrates researches on interaction design and business process management with practical implications. This methodology is devoted to aligning the needs of enterprise system users with business processes (BPs).

Design/methodology/approach

This approach establishes an unbroken network of links between BPs, task models and abstract representations of user interfaces. Once the models are linked, it is possible to identify the impact that any change on these models may produce in other models. The main challenge is to organize the linked models according to the organizational context and manage those links with consistency in order to support improving process efficiency and user productivity. This approach has been applied in a large telecommunications organization during four months with its application in two different projects and validated with a cost‐benefit analysis.

Findings

Applying this approach in large organizations has demonstrated that: every involved stakeholder is capable of understanding the whole approach in one working day; creating the models and linking them with the corresponding business process models takes around three men/day per core business process; and applying this approach brings up to 60 per cent of return on investment related to process improvement and user experience.

Originality/value

The main differentials of this methodology include using simple models; considering light actions; preserving the independence of technology; and adopting a human‐oriented approach assuring that every managed information impacts people and not only systems, thus enabling fast adaptation to the business dynamism.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Petra Schubert and Susan P. Williams

Identifying the benefits arising from implementations of enterprise systems and realizing business value remains a significant challenge for both research and industry…

3326

Abstract

Purpose

Identifying the benefits arising from implementations of enterprise systems and realizing business value remains a significant challenge for both research and industry. This paper aims to consolidate previous work. It presents a framework for investigating enterprise systems benefits and business change, which addresses the identified limitations of previous research and provides a more detailed analysis of benefits and their contextual variation.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on data gathered from 31 real‐world organizations (case studies) of differing size, maturity, and industry sector, the study adopts an iterative content analysis to empirically derive a comprehensive benefits framework.

Findings

The content analysis provides a detailed classification of expectations and benefits, which is described in a four‐level framework. The four levels (areas) are further subdivided into aspects and criteria plus an attributed appraisal value. The resulting scheme for the “three‐level benefit codes” provides a greater level of detail about the nature of expected and realized benefits.

Practical implications

The high level of detail and the code scheme comprising 60 different codes and the method for deriving the codes allows companies to identify and define benefits as well as to assess the outcome of enterprise systems implementation projects.

Originality/value

The paper empirically develops an applicable benefits framework, which addresses the lack of detail of previous frameworks.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Martin Gersch, Michael Hewing and Bernd Schöler

In contemporary times process‐oriented approaches in information management are elementary in meeting business challenges. However, most methods for business process…

5696

Abstract

Purpose

In contemporary times process‐oriented approaches in information management are elementary in meeting business challenges. However, most methods for business process management (BPM) focus on improved performance from only the company's perspective. They neglect the growing importance of value co‐creation between company and customer that typically results from a service‐dominant logic. Modern BPM methods need to focus on the internal performance of processes whilst including the customer's perspective. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

By combining the market‐oriented approach, service blueprinting, with the syntax of business process modeling, the authors introduce a method that visualizes and analyzes processes simultaneously from the company's and customer's point of view. Within this integrated approach, information management and marketing are linked. A used case illustrates implementation and benefits of this method.

Findings

This paper addresses the gap between marketing and information management sciences. “Business Process Blueprinting” (BP2) provides a conceptual foundation for a further integration of these two scopes of interest.

Research limitations/implications

The integrated view on processes supports an enhanced understanding of process performance. In its current stage, the method reflects a basic combined approach – further development is needed. Well‐established models and tools from controlling and marketing as well as from other fields can be integrated to open this analysis for service elements.

Practical implications

Applying BP2 to practical process analysis promotes a better understanding of the customer's process perception. This potentially leads to a more efficient and effective process design.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the missing method for the integration of the effectiveness‐driven perspective into business process modeling.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Tim Jacks, Prashant Palvia, Richard Schilhavy and Lei Wang

Despite the constant stream of research investigating information technology (IT) business value, IT capabilities, and competitive advantage, researchers are calling for a…

2979

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the constant stream of research investigating information technology (IT) business value, IT capabilities, and competitive advantage, researchers are calling for a more coherent understanding of the firm‐level impacts of IT, and how those firm‐level impacts can be measured. The purpose of this study is to investigate the multitude of organization‐level studies of the impact of IT.

Design/methodology/approach

Meta‐analysis of IS literature from 2001‐2009.

Findings

The findings are synthesized into an overarching framework of the impact of IT at the organization level. The framework categorizes measures of the impact of IT into productivity, profitability, and intangible benefits, while the antecedents of IT impact are categorized into IT resources, IT capabilities, IT/business alignment and external factors.

Originality/value

The research framework proposed provides a comprehensive snapshot of IS studies on organizational performance.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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