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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Sabine Fliess, Stefan Dyck and Mailin Schmelter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customer perceptions of their own contribution to service provision, in order to enhance our understanding of customer…

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2385

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customer perceptions of their own contribution to service provision, in order to enhance our understanding of customer contribution and its dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 27 in-depth interviews were conducted across nine service contexts. Qualitative data were then analyzed to identify the various dimensions of customer contribution.

Findings

First, the study contributes to the understanding of customer contribution in identifying physical, mental, and emotional dimensions. The physical and mental dimensions of customer contribution are represented by activities, while emotions comprise mood and emotional states. Second, relationships among the three dimensions were identified; in particular, physical and mental activities were found to influence customer emotions. Third, the findings reveal that customer understanding of their own contribution to service provision encompass the co-creative sphere of customer and provider, and extends to the customer-sphere before the service encounter.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative study is limited in terms of generalizability, since the 27 interview cases were based on nine interviews each covering three service settings. Further research is needed to investigate how the dimensions of customer contribution are linked to different outcomes (e.g. service value, satisfaction, loyalty), thus providing a quantitative validation of our findings.

Practical implications

Understanding the customer contribution to service provision is pivotal for service design. Service managers need to reflect on how the different dimensions of contribution manifest in their existing or potential service offering, since physical and mental customer activities shape their emotions, which in turn impact on the service experience and value.

Originality/value

Little in-depth research has been conducted on the nature and dimensionality of customer contributions to service provision, particularly with regard to perceptions of their own contribution. Most previous empirical research on customer contribution is limited to a specific context and concerned with customer behaviors. Hence, this qualitative study examines customer contribution across different service context, focussing on customer perceptions in terms of physical, mental, and emotional contributions to service provision.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Professor Bo Edvardsson and Professor Anders Gustafsson

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288

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Stefan Prigge and Lars Tegtmeier

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether stocks in football clubs are valued in line with the valuation of other capital assets in the capital market. Moreover, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether stocks in football clubs are valued in line with the valuation of other capital assets in the capital market. Moreover, it analyzes the risk profile of football stocks. By taking this perspective, the paper also contributes to the discussion on the motives of those who invest in football clubs, particularly the question of whether they expect extra benefits, i.e., in addition to dividends and share price appreciation, from the investments.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study analyzes the share prices of 19 listed European football clubs from January 2010 to December 2016. Building on the capital asset pricing model, the authors used Zellner’s (1962) seemingly unrelated regressions.

Findings

The results indicate that the majority of the football clubs in the sample are overvalued. This implies that investments in football stocks are mainly attractive for those investors who expect to derive extra benefits from their investment. That might be likely for strategic, patron and fan investors, but not for purely financial investors.

Research limitations/implications

As a next step, more advanced factor models could be applied to the analysis.

Practical implications

For investors, the results imply that portfolio diversification is particularly beneficial while buying football stocks. For football clubs, the rather low general market risk, combined with the overvaluation, leads to low equity costs when new shares are issued.

Originality/value

The results suggest that dividends and share price appreciation are not the only benefits football stock owners derive from the stocks, thus underlining that further investigations in their motives to hold football stocks are very promising.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mike Peters, Margit Raich, Stefan Märk and Sabine Pichler

The take‐over of the hospitality family business by the entrepreneur's daughter or son is a complex process. The aim of the paper is to analyse the impact of commitment on…

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1299

Abstract

Purpose

The take‐over of the hospitality family business by the entrepreneur's daughter or son is a complex process. The aim of the paper is to analyse the impact of commitment on succession in hospitality family businesses from the viewpoint of the successors. The contribution aims to shed more light on the different dimensions of commitment relevant for the succession process.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the role of commitment in the succession process this study uses a qualitative approach. Interviews were carried out with 15 successors of hospitality businesses in South Tyrol, Italy. The obtained narrative texts have been transcribed and evaluated with GABEK®, a tool for analyzing qualitative data. The transcripts of the interviews were separated into text units and coded, developing a network of data. This rule‐based procedure of systematizing, coding and interpreting considers both syntax and semantics and enhances the validity of the results.

Findings

The results reveal that commitment seems to play a very major role in the whole succession. A cluster analysis indicates the linkage of three topics: Motives, Family business and Take‐over constitute the construct “Commitment”. The motives show that parents' heritage or the successors' perceptions of the business as the home where they have grown up are important reasons to run this family business. Also trust or personal support through family members can be interpreted as push motives to become the successor.

Research limitations/implications

Results may be influenced by the geographical concentration, but also by the selection process of the interviewees. The research is based on qualitative data that were gathered in one particular region in South Tyrol, Italy. Furthermore, the successors who participated in the survey mostly were very successful businesses keen on joining this research. Further research should focus on the role of commitment and its antecedents and consequences. In addition, commitment bases should be investigated from the predecessor but also from the successors' perspective in the light of the current and past business and business environment situation.

Practical implications

The results highlight that in the succession process, different bases of commitment exist which particularly influence the perception of succession process. Furthermore, they can be interpreted as hurdles or facilitators to the transition of the family business.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information on the impact of commitment on succession in hospitality family businesses from the viewpoint of the successors.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Abstract

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Matjaz Mulej, Vojko Potocan, Zdenka Zenko, Stefan Kajzer, Dusko Ursic, Jozica Knez‐Riedl, Monty Lynn and Jozef Ovsenik

Ludwig von Bertalanffy created general systems theory in an effort to counter the oversight and endangerment of humankind by disciplinary specialization. Bertalanffy…

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1667

Abstract

Ludwig von Bertalanffy created general systems theory in an effort to counter the oversight and endangerment of humankind by disciplinary specialization. Bertalanffy desired for a holistic worldview and openness to replace overspecialization. Although widely cited and regarded, his concept prevailed only at a fictitious level, mostly as a tool inside specialization, which many scholars are neither able to overcome nor complement with interdisciplinary, creative co‐operation. Similarities (isomorphisms) are not enough. Here, a system of seven groups of systems thinking principles, which serve as a framework for restoring Bertalanffian systems thinking without his exaggerations is presented.

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Kybernetes, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Matjazˇ Mulej, Stefan Kajzer, Vojko Potocan, Bojan Rosi and Jozica Knez‐Riedl

To show that systems theory (ST) has surfaced as innovation of worldview and thinking, aimed at holism. After ST's subordination to narrow specialists using it inside…

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1412

Abstract

Purpose

To show that systems theory (ST) has surfaced as innovation of worldview and thinking, aimed at holism. After ST's subordination to narrow specialists using it inside traditional disciplines, if at all, humankind needs a new innovation of ST. An option is offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Mulej's Dialectical ST is applied as worldview and methodology of requisite holism using Mulej's Dialectical System concept.

Findings

Mulej's Dialectical System concept applies to synergies of several STs, not only viewpoints. Here, six soft STs and the social responsibility (SR) concept are combined around human subjective starting points aimed at holism and innovation, including ethics of interdependence. Combination offers new insights.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to soft STs and implies knowledge of more STs and SR as well as participants' readiness for creative interdisciplinary co‐operation.

Practical implications

The new concept offers a new step toward increased innovation capacity, especially toward innovation of culture toward requisite holism and innovation. This is a crucial precondition for survival in the modern global society and economy.

Originality/value

The authors know neither books nor articles presenting synergies of several STs and SR nor their application to preconditions of innovation.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Susanne Durst and Stefan Wilhelm

An ignorance of knowledge attrition caused by employee exits is considered as careless and can lead to considerable consequences regarding both a firm's financial capital

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7544

Abstract

Purpose

An ignorance of knowledge attrition caused by employee exits is considered as careless and can lead to considerable consequences regarding both a firm's financial capital and intellectual capital, or in other words an ignorance of the danger of knowledge loss is associated with a missing or improper succession planning. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how a medium‐sized firm copes with the danger of knowledge loss due to employee exit or long‐term absence.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained through semi‐structured interviews with 14 organization members from a German medium‐sized enterprise operating in the printing sector. These participants represented different departments and positions.

Findings

The findings demonstrate the influence of a precarious financial situation on activities related to knowledge management and succession planning. Although the organization members are aware of obvious needs for improvement within the firm, their actual scope of action is centered on the execution of current orders.

Research limitations/implications

The data are cross‐sectional and were collected in one organization. Future studies should consider longitudinal designs across multiple organizations.

Practical implications

Based on the findings some suggestions were derived that may help firms facing similar circumstances.

Originality/value

The study's findings provide fresh insights into how an established firm tackles the issue of knowledge attrition and its likely implications for the firm's performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Peter Franck and Stefan Sundgren

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether ownership concentration, leverage and demand for equity financing is associated with internal corporate governance quality…

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2033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether ownership concentration, leverage and demand for equity financing is associated with internal corporate governance quality. The paper focuses on dimensions of governance quality that are related to financial reporting quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors measure internal governance quality by an indicator variable that takes on higher values depending on whether a company has an audit committee, has a sufficient number of audit committee meetings during the year, has financial expertise on the audit committee, has an internal auditing function, a risk management function, a code of conduct and whistle blower provisions in the code of conduct. The sample consists of 91 Swedish listed companies of which 39 companies had to follow the Swedish Corporate Governance Code. The development of hypotheses is based on agency theory. Ordered logistic regressions are used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The paper finds a strong negative association between leverage and the internal governance quality score for companies that do not have to follow the Corporate Governance Code. The paper also finds a positive association between the governance quality score and dispersed ownership among companies that have to follow the code.

Research limitations/implications

The negative association between leverage and governance quality is opposite to the typical agency theory prediction. A number of other studies have also documented negative or insignificant associations with leverage in related settings. The research suggests there is a demand to develop theories related to leverage and the implementation of governance characteristics beyond the typical agency theory based predictions.

Practical implications

The results raise the question whether lenders more actively directly or indirectly should influence the governance quality of borrowers.

Originality/value

Based on the conjecture that governance quality increases with the number of governance elements, the paper studies a governance score that is built up by several elements of good corporate governance. Furthermore, the authors study a setting dominated by voluntary choices of governance quality, which makes it possible to study supply effects.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Matthias Filser, Sascha Kraus and Stefan Märk

Family firms appear to be an attractive topic in a number of research areas. Probably the most important topic is still the succession process combined with possible…

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3537

Abstract

Purpose

Family firms appear to be an attractive topic in a number of research areas. Probably the most important topic is still the succession process combined with possible hurdles and gaps. This paper aims to focus on the special variable of the psychological dimension. It attempts to summarize findings and implications as well as suggestions for where potential research gaps are.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a two‐stage research design. The first step is a literature review. All articles published in the Family Business Review (FBR) between 1997 and 2011 were collected and analysed regarding their topics, findings, and implications. As a second step, this knowledge has been applied to conduct a thorough literature analysis on psychological aspects of succession.

Findings

Psychological aspects are often used together with other constructs. The authors strongly recommend handling them as an individualized, highly complex topic, even if social, political, and other aspects are often mixed with psychological aspects and therefore difficult to discuss and separate. A separation of these factors will help researchers present findings in a much clearer way.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the article lies in the methodology itself, as the literature review solely concentrates on empirical papers that exclusively investigate psychological aspects with regard to succession. Nevertheless, the aim was to elaborate a focused psychological field model in terms of succession. Likewise, critical aspects considering the family business system have been taken into consideration. Finally, a literature review is commonly seen as a post‐work “dead body”. However, the implications show a clear, directed focus within family business research. The authors recommend an increase in the number of concisely formulated research questions instead of generic approaches.

Practical implications

Businesses should closely heed three imperative problem areas (individual, interpersonal and organizational) as well as the stage in which conflicts arise (preparation, transfer/takeover, and continuation), if they want to be successful in the succession process.

Originality/value

The paper offers an overview of the limited number of existing articles and their implications that address the psychological aspects of the succession process. Furthermore, the psychological issues identified that cause conflicts during succession are consolidated and categorized.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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