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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

H. Waki, H. Igarashi and T. Honma

To analyze effectively magnetic shielding effects by shields with fine structure.

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze effectively magnetic shielding effects by shields with fine structure.

Design/methodology/approach

Simplification of the fine structure makes it possible to analyze them efficiently. The authors have introduced a homogenization method to estimate effective permeability of magnetic composite structure for the static field. The homogenization method is applied to the analysis of magnetic shields composed of steel plates and steel rods against DC power lines to test its feasibility.

Findings

The properties of the magnetic shielding are analyzed by using the homogenization method. The errors of the magnetic fields increase in case of very few layers.

Originality/value

The simplification of the magnetic shields with fine structure by using the homogenization method makes it possible to analyze efficiently magnetic shielding effects, although the accuracy becomes worse in case of very few layers.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Adam Roman Petrycki and Osama (Sam) Salem

In fire condition, the time to failure of a timber connection is mainly reliant on the wood charring rate, the strength of the residual wood section, and the limiting…

Abstract

Purpose

In fire condition, the time to failure of a timber connection is mainly reliant on the wood charring rate, the strength of the residual wood section, and the limiting temperature of the steel connectors involved in the connection. The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the effects of loaded bolt end distance, number of bolt rows, and the existence of perpendicular-to-wood grain reinforcement on the structural fire behavior of semi-rigid glued-laminated timber (glulam) beam-to-column connections that used steel bolts and concealed steel plate connectors.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 beam-to-column connections, which were fabricated in wood-steel-wood bolted connection configurations, in eight large-scale sub-frame test assemblies were exposed to elevated temperatures that followed CAN/ULC-S101 standard time-temperature curve, while being subjected to monotonic loading. The beam-to-column connections of four of the eight test assemblies were reinforced perpendicular to the wood grain using self-tapping screws (STS). Fire tests were terminated upon achieving the failure criterion, which predominantly was dependent on the connection’s maximum allowed rotation.

Findings

Experimental results revealed that increasing the number of bolt rows from two to three, each of two bolts, increased the connection’s time to failure by a greater time increment than that achieved by increasing the bolt end distance from four- to five-times the bolt diameter. Also, the use of STS reinforcement increased the connection’s time to failure by greater time increments than those achieved by increasing the number of bolt rows or the bolt end distance.

Originality/value

The invaluable experimental data obtained from this study can be effectively used to provide insight and better understanding on how mass-timber glulam bolted connections can behave in fire condition. This can also help in further improving the existing design guidelines for mass-timber structures. Currently, beam-to-column wood connections are designed mainly as axially loaded connections with no guidelines available for determining the fire resistance of timber connections exerting any degree of moment-resisting capability.

Details

Journal of Structural Fire Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-2317

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Jaroslav Mackerle

To provide a selective bibliography for researchers working with bulk material forming (specifically the forging, rolling, extrusion and drawing processes) with sources…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a selective bibliography for researchers working with bulk material forming (specifically the forging, rolling, extrusion and drawing processes) with sources which can help them to be up‐to‐date.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of published (1996‐2005) works, which aims to provide theoretical as well as practical information on the material processing namely bulk material forming. Bulk deformation processes used in practice change the shape of the workpiece by plastic deformations under forces applied by tools and dies.

Findings

Provides information about each source, indicating what can be found there. Listed references contain journal papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations on the subject.

Research limitations/implications

It is an exhaustive list of papers (1,693 references are listed) but some papers may be omitted. The emphasis is to present papers written in English language. Sheet material forming processes are not included.

Practical implications

A very useful source of information for theoretical and practical researchers in computational material forming as well as in academia or for those who have recently obtained a position in this field.

Originality/value

There are not many bibliographies published in this field of engineering. This paper offers help to experts and individuals interested in computational analyses and simulations of material forming processes.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1961

TITANIUM Influence of palladium on resistance and passivation. The metal laboratory of the Metallgesellschaft A.G., Frankfurt/Main, has investigated the influence of a…

Abstract

TITANIUM Influence of palladium on resistance and passivation. The metal laboratory of the Metallgesellschaft A.G., Frankfurt/Main, has investigated the influence of a palladium admixture on the corrosion resistance of titanium and titanium alloys in 20% hydrochloric acid. It was found that the addition of 0.1% palladium resulted in an improvement of the corrosion resistance not only of non‐alloyed titanium but also of titanium alloys. In solutions containing nitric acid above the passivation limit (0.13%) the corrosion resistance of certain titanium alloys was also improved. With non‐alloyed titanium, the palladium admixture is able to compensate fully the increase in corrosion otherwise caused by the iron contents.—(U. Zwicker, Metalloberfläche, 1960, 14 (11), 334–337.)

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1955

A. Pickworth

Steel—one of the most commonly used metals, especially in ship construction—is unfortunately one of the most corrodible. Moreover, conditions favourable to corrosion are…

Abstract

Steel—one of the most commonly used metals, especially in ship construction—is unfortunately one of the most corrodible. Moreover, conditions favourable to corrosion are ever‐present in a floating structure and, because of long voyages away from a home port and conditions of service, a ship can receive thorough examination and maintenance only at long intervals. Intelligent maintenance requires a knowledge of the causes of corrosion and of the methods of combating it and is of primary importance, but much can be done by designers and constructors in their respective spheres to minimise the tendency to corrode by eliminating, as far as possible, bad features in design and workmanship with a view to rendering maintenance easier.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Valentin Nemkov and Robert Goldstein

Effect of unstable “wavy” temperature distribution on the part surface during the process of induction heating of ferromagnetic materials was observed and reported by two…

Abstract

Purpose

Effect of unstable “wavy” temperature distribution on the part surface during the process of induction heating of ferromagnetic materials was observed and reported by two Russian scientists in 1940 (Babat and Lozinskii, 1940). They reported that under certain conditions, one can observe periodical or quasi-periodical bright stripes on the part surface when its temperature passes through the Curie point. In time, these stripes expand and merge, forming a normal temperature pattern. They called this phenomenon “polosatiy nagrev” (striation heating). Let us call it the “zebra effect” for simplicity. It can exist for a relatively long time, from several seconds to several tens of seconds. Several explanations of the zebra effect were proposed with not very convincing arguments. The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Wider spreading of induction technology and use of computer simulation of induction processes create a demand and open new possibilities for study of the zebra effect. This study provides an overview of the available information about the zebra effect and gives new explanation of this phenomenon based on existing experimental data and new results of simulation. Conditions for zebra occurrence and its technological importance or limitations are discussed.

Findings

Computer simulation using the Flux 2D program allows to demonstrate the striation (zebra) effect that can appear in the process of heating magnetic materials and reproduce main experimental findings related to this effect. Simulation provides a great opportunity to investigate the zebra phenomenon in virtual reality, providing qualitatively correct results. Results of simulation show that the zebra effect can appear in a relatively narrow range of material properties and operating conditions. The main factor is a big enough gradient of permeability near the Curie point. At present, it is difficult to expect high quantitative accuracy of simulation due to multiple assumptions in simulation algorithms and insufficient or inaccurate information about the material properties near the Curie point.

Originality/value

Several explanations of the zebra effect were proposed with not very convincing arguments. There were concerns that the zebra effect could set significant limits on the use of induction heating for surface hardening due to non-uniform temperature distribution along the part (Babat and Lozinskii, 1940; Babat, 1965; Lozinskii, 1949, 1969). However, it did not happen. There were no complaints from scientists or practitioners regarding any negative effect of the zebra phenomenon. Moreover, the authors of this paper did not find any original publications on this issue for more than half a century. Only few old induction experts confirm that they observed the zebra effect or something similar, whereas a great majority of induction community members never heard about it.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1934

THE Avro 642 has been designed as both a twin‐engined and four‐engined model.

Abstract

THE Avro 642 has been designed as both a twin‐engined and four‐engined model.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 6 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Rune Wigblad, Magnus Hansson, Keith Townsend and John Lewer

This paper aims to explore and analyse how shifting frontiers of control emerge and change the labour process so that restrictions to output become diminished…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore and analyse how shifting frontiers of control emerge and change the labour process so that restrictions to output become diminished, subsequently affecting organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case study design. Interviews with 104 respondents. Analysis of productivity statistics in order to test for the statistical significance of the closedown effect. Single multiple regression analysis of the comparative strength, of the closedown effect, between cases.

Findings

Shifting frontiers of control arise during the closedown process, a control system characterised by markedly unrestricted autonomy for the workers as the management frontiers of control abate. This provides an operative space for informal work practices, innovation and emerging new industrial relations, accounting for the higher levels of output.

Research limitations/implications

A multiple case study of three different manufacturing organisations, with comparably long closedown periods. The authors do not analyse the sustainability of the increase in output or the generalisibility of the closedown effect to other industries.

Practical implications

It is possible to anticipate improved productivity if shifting frontiers of control are rapidly replacing the old. If management abandons the old control mechanisms, previous to the closedown decision, and provides operative space for workers' initiatives and informal leadership during the closedown process, it is possible to expect good performance, enabling a scope for extended closedown periods.

Originality/value

This is the first study that analyses the comparative strength of the closedown effect and how restricted work practices change under the process of closedown.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1937

THE following lists of contracts placed by the Air Ministry during September and October are extracted from the October and November issues of The Ministry of Labour Gazette:

Abstract

THE following lists of contracts placed by the Air Ministry during September and October are extracted from the October and November issues of The Ministry of Labour Gazette:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 9 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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