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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Theodosios Sapounidis, Ioannis Stamelos and Stavros Demetriadis

This chapter examines the existing work on tangible user interfaces (TUIs) and focuses on tangible programming with the scope to enlighten the opportunities for innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the existing work on tangible user interfaces (TUIs) and focuses on tangible programming with the scope to enlighten the opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship in this particular domain.

Methodology/approach

In the first section, we start by presenting in short the history of TUIs and then focus on tangible programming presenting the different design approaches. Then we present the opportunities for innovation and guidelines for future products.

In the second section, we review the entrepreneurial activities that combine educational toys and TUIs.

Findings

The main finding of this chapter is that although TUI design and research are still in its infancy and more design guidelines and research are required to further bridge the digital and the physical world, the first signs of entrepreneurship promise a bright future.

Research limitations

Limitations arise from the fact that many companies keep many of their financial data confidential. Thus, it was impossible to include and validate all the information that we intended to present.

Practical implications

Initially, this chapter motivates and challenges scientist to find novel innovative solutions in the field. Then, reveals the entrepreneurial opportunities and potential customers. Finally, shows the funding sources and how tangible products are offered in the market.

Social implications

We propose a new kind of toys that might alter and expand science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in education.

Originality/value

This chapter appears to be unique in the sense that is the first that reports simultaneously on TUIs, entrepreneurship, and innovation.

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Pantelis M. Papadopoulos, Stavros N. Demetriadis, Ioannis G. Stamelos and Ioannis A. Tsoukalas

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of question prompts on student learning in relation to their learning styles. The context of the study is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of question prompts on student learning in relation to their learning styles. The context of the study is technology‐enhanced learning in an ill‐structured domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conditions were the same for all the students in the four learning style groups. Student learning style was the independent variable, while students' attitudes and task performance were the dependent variables of the study. Pre‐test treatment post‐test method was used. Students studied in a web‐based learning environment during treatment.

Findings

The integration of question prompts as student supporting tool in technology‐enhanced learning environments might not improve learning for all students alike independent of their learning styles.

Research limitations/implications

Small uneven groups because the researcher has no control over the student distribution across the different learning style profiles.

Practical implications

The suggestion for designers is to consider combining prompting with other scaffolding methods, in order to effectively support all students independent of their learning styles.

Originality/value

The paper combines learning in ill‐structured domains through cases and a scaffolding method based on question prompts focusing on contextual elements. The results of the study inform the designers of TELEs that although prompting can be generally helpful, parameters such as the students' learning style are able to limit the cognitive benefit emerging from the prompting intervention.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Maria Kyprianidou, Stavros Demetriadis, Andreas Pombortsis and George Karatasios

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web‐based system person‐centred group‐activity support system (PEGASUS) in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web‐based system person‐centred group‐activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person‐centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct objectives: enhancing metacognition (students and teachers are supported to identify their learning and teaching preferences, which in turn is used as a framework for reflection), and group formation (the system suggests homogeneous or heterogeneous workgroups, supporting also teacher‐students negotiations of the final group synthesis).

Design/methodology/approach

First, a theoretical framework is built to reflect the process of transforming the principles for learner‐centred learning into a pedagogical model which becomes the basis for defining the PEGASUS specifications. Then, qualitative field evidence is provided from the initial integration of the system into the teaching process to support students' group activity.

Findings

From the pilot testing of PEGASUS it is evident that learning style‐based group formation might not be acceptable to all students in the typical classroom setting where students already know each other. The early implementation data indicate that not every student might accept the theory‐based grouping suggestions of the instructor.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to qualitative and preliminary results from undergraduate as well as postgraduate students.

Practical implications

Systems like PEGASUS can initiate fruitful discussions among students and teachers on the role of learning styles in learning. However, group activity is a complex socio‐cognitive phenomenon that cannot be approached simply on the basis of students' learning styles. Still, such a system can help identify how students' learning styles can be of significance under certain conditions.

Originality/value

The paper describes the development of a web‐based system for personalised learning and system integration in everyday teaching.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Hye Jeong Kim, Susan Pederson and Moira Baldwin

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ experiences with a case‐enhanced e‐learning environment in a higher‐education institute.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ experiences with a case‐enhanced e‐learning environment in a higher‐education institute.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 67 graduate students volunteered to take part in this experiment. The participants were assigned to treatment groups using tutorial with case‐based learning (CBL) module or comparison groups using tutorial only. They completed a background survey, a technological proficiency survey, a pre‐ and post‐knowledge test, and a learner perception survey of the e‐learning environment.

Findings

The present study found a significant increase in the level of domain knowledge in both a tutorial‐only group and a tutorial with CBL module group. The tutorial with CBL group scored significantly higher on learners’ perceptions of the e‐learning environment in terms of ease of use, satisfaction, and usefulness. In addition, the results of the use of a CBL module based on individual differences such as gender, degree level, and information technology self‐efficacy are discussed.

Practical implications

Designing an e‐learning environment for adult learners needs to consider their needs and motives. Adult learners who have specific learning goals tend to be more satisfied with an interactive and supportive e‐learning environment using real cases, rather than sequential and less flexible e‐learning only.

Originality/value

This paper describes an e‐learning system including the case module to enhance learner's satisfaction and knowledge. The paper contributes to the literature on CBL in adult learning and higher education context and in the design of a practical learning environment for user satisfaction.

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