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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2011

David C. Li

Building upon studies of social psychology and information system literature, this study aims to propose and empirically test a research model that incorporates…

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5251

Abstract

Purpose

Building upon studies of social psychology and information system literature, this study aims to propose and empirically test a research model that incorporates interpersonal motives (sociability and status) and hedonic motive (perceived enjoyment), and the three processes of social influence: compliance, identification and internalisation, to explain one's intention to use social network (SN) web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were obtained from an online survey of 274 SN web site users. Structural equation modelling analysis was used to validate the proposed model.

Findings

The results indicate that social influence affects intention directly through the compliance process. Social influence, when exerted through the identification and internalization processes, affects intention indirectly via the two interpersonal motives (sociability and status) and perceived enjoyment. The two interpersonal motives affect intention indirectly via perceived enjoyment.

Research limitations/implications

This study advances theory by examining how the social influence processes affect one's behavioural intention via the interpersonal and hedonic motives.

Practical implications

These findings help online SNs to devise strategies to attract and retain users.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that social influence processes are also operative in one's adoption of information technology in non‐work settings. It also shows that people have two interpersonal motives in mind when they develop an online relationship with others.

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Hadeer Hammad, Viola Muster, Noha M. El-Bassiouny and Martina Schaefer

Conspicuous consumption and sustainable consumption are commonly understood as being in contradiction with each other. Yet, scholars have recently become increasingly…

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1311

Abstract

Purpose

Conspicuous consumption and sustainable consumption are commonly understood as being in contradiction with each other. Yet, scholars have recently become increasingly interested in examining positive relationships between these forms of consumption. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the synergies and contradictions between sustainable and luxury consumption and proposing whether and how conspicuous motives can foster a shift towards sustainable consumption in newly industrialized countries in general and Egypt in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual note, intended as a starting point and acting as an eye-opener regarding the values inherent in both conspicuous and sustainable consumption and the potential influence that conspicuous motivations could have on the latter.

Findings

The paper discusses the possibilities for and limitations of conspicuous motives to foster sustainable consumption in newly industrialized countries in the Middle East. The adoption of westernized lifestyles, spreading in Middle Eastern countries, can represent a venue for motivating sustainable consumption behaviours as a means of status distinction. On the other hand, the trickle-down effect and the preconditions of visibility and exclusiveness pose risks on promoting sustainable consumption by addressing conspicuous motives.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the synergistic interplay between conspicuous and sustainable consumption, as well as barriers and motivations underpinning both constructs, needs to be empirically researched, while factoring in the cultural specifics of the countries under study, as cultural nuances can influence the dynamics of interaction between conspicuous and sustainable behaviours.

Originality/value

Given the salience of the relationship between luxury and sustainable consumption and the focus of most studies on early-industrialized countries, insights regarding the possible influences of conspicuous motives on sustainable consumption in newly industrialized countries are warranted. With the scarcity of research examining the ambiguous relationship between conspicuous and sustainable consumption in newly industrialized countries, this paper contributes by providing insights about the conditions that can help conspicuous motives promote sustainable consumption in newly industrialized countries.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Matti Haverila, Caitlin McLaughlin, Kai Christian Haverila and Julio Viskovics

The purpose of this research is to compare two different sample populations (student and general) to determine the impact of brand community motives on brand community engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to compare two different sample populations (student and general) to determine the impact of brand community motives on brand community engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Two samples were drawn for the purpose of the current research. The first sample was drawn among the members of various brand communities from a general North American population sample (N = 503). The second sample was drawn purely from students, belonging to a variety of brand communities, from a middle-sized Canadian university (N = 195). Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to analyse the strength, significance and effect sizes of the relationships between brand community motive and engagement constructs.

Findings

The findings indicate that the impact of brand community motives varied by sample population. The information and entertainment motives were significantly related to brand community engagement in both sample populations with roughly equal effect sizes. The social integration motive was again significantly related to the brand community engagement construct in the student sample population – but not for the general North American general population sample. Further, the self-discovery motive and status enhancement motives were significantly related to brand community engagement in the North American sample, but not for the student sample. This indicates significant differences between the two sample populations.

Originality/value

The results of the current research demonstrate that student populations are significantly different from the general population regarding their motives towards brand communities. This indicates that brand community managers need to be aware of the motives of different brand community members and also that they need to exercise caution about utilizing purely student data to make decisions about brand community management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

A.R.S. Ibn Ali and Wirawan Dony Dahana

This paper aims to address how the status consumption tendency of consumers in emerging markets is negatively influenced by five individual traits: self-control…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address how the status consumption tendency of consumers in emerging markets is negatively influenced by five individual traits: self-control, self-actualization, religiosity, future orientation and self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

A conjoint experiment measured the importance of certain smartphone product attributes. A latent class regression analysis was then employed to estimate segment-level part-worths using conjoint data collected from 500 Bangladeshi consumers.

Findings

The results revealed three segments with members that differ in how they evaluate smartphone product attributes. Those susceptible to a product's brand name (i.e. status seekers) appear to have low self-control, are less religious and are more myopic.

Research limitations/implications

An issue may exist with generalizability, as the analysis was conducted based on data collected in one country and for one product category. However, this study's framework provides direction for future researchers to better understand status consumption in emerging countries.

Practical implications

The findings are useful for marketers selling status products to improve market segmentation and target their offerings more efficiently.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is twofold. First, it investigates the influencing factors of status consumption that have not been addressed in the extant literature. Second, it is the first to use experimental data to measure segment-level status consumption accurately.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Valsaraj Payini, Kartikeya Bolar, Jyothi Mallya and Vasanth Kamath

This study aims to identify and validate the different clusters of wine festival visitors based on their hedonic motivation. Further, this study also sought how identified…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and validate the different clusters of wine festival visitors based on their hedonic motivation. Further, this study also sought how identified clusters were different in terms of perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty to the wine festival.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted during the International Beach Wine Festival held in Karnataka, India, to collect primary data from 400 visitors. Data were subjected to a two-step cluster analysis. Further, cluster segmentation based on visitors’ demographics, perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty was conducted. Decision tree analysis based on recursive partitioning algorithm was used to validate the clusters.

Findings

A two-step cluster analysis identified two distinct segments and named those as elite and informal visitors based on hedonic motivation. The cluster scores show that the elite group had the best ratings on social status, socialization and family harmony. On the other hand, the informal group had top scores for wine tasting, enjoyment, change from routine and the festival atmosphere. Decision tree analysis results indicate that social status enjoyment and taste motives differentiate an informal group from the elite group.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in a wine festival held in a single location. To assess the strength of the results, case studies in other regions will be of importance.

Originality/value

This study extended the knowledge of the wine festival by adapting hedonic motivation as a basis for wine festival segmentation. Besides, this study’s empirical findings would greatly benefit wine festival organizers to formulate an appropriate marketing strategy to target each wine festival visitors’ cluster based on the differentiating factors obtained from the decision tree modelling.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Mario J. Miranda

The purpose of this paper is to give retailers an insight into consumers' capacity for feeling pleasure associated with specific purchase motivations across different…

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5348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give retailers an insight into consumers' capacity for feeling pleasure associated with specific purchase motivations across different product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

A hedonic regression model was estimated from data collected from shoppers in shopping malls that enabled the generation of implicit prices of each constituent purchasing motive.

Findings

Hedonic values of consumer motivations vary for different products categories. Convenience items, like bread, allow little scope for self‐congruence, whereas shampoo offers significant scope for pleasurable emotive appeals to boost consumers' status enhancement and social image. This study identified opportunities to create good feelings for the purchase of both bread and shampoos, by engaging shoppers' attention on themes relating to social referents and family values. Shopping items like apparel and specialty items like cosmetics offer prospects of titillating consumer motives of status and self‐image enhancement, respectively, by engaging them with reputable merchandise in reputable settings.

Research limitations/implications

No insight was sought on the hedonic value of consumers' buying motivations of impulse purchases.

Practical implications

Products that are used in public (apparel) or whose consumption outcome is manifest in public (shampoos and cosmetics), have purchase motivations that are susceptible to hedonic appeals. On the other hand, only a few purchase motivations for products like bread, with limited “public face”, have some hedonic value. The results of this study inform retailers on choice of purchase motivations to direct engagement appeals in order to generate emotional excitement. Getting consumers to fantasize on themes relating to relevant purchasing motives could facilitate their purchase choice.

Originality/value

Targeting consumers' preferred urges is an efficient way to stimulate buying intentions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Tasos Spiliotopoulos and Ian Oakley

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on how people navigate the social media ecosystem and how they decide, which social network site (SNS) to use. To this end, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on how people navigate the social media ecosystem and how they decide, which social network site (SNS) to use. To this end, the current study draws from uses and gratifications (U&G) theory to elicit and compare motives for the use of Facebook and Twitter and uses behavioral data to examine the findings in the context of technology non-use.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to 232 Facebook users and the results were complemented with 12 usage variables collected via the Facebook application programing interface for the same users. Exploratory factor analysis identified and described the motives for using Facebook and Twitter and multiple regression models examined the relationships between the motives for using the two sites. A multivariate analysis of variance and a series of t-tests investigated the differences in actual behavior between Twitter users and non-users.

Findings

Results suggest that SNS users will use both sites to gratify their need for information, but will only do so for entertainment that has social characteristics. Furthermore, Facebook users that are more embedded in the site and use the site to support their offline life are more likely to also use Twitter.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for SNS researchers, designers and managers by highlighting the motivational and behavioral differences between users of the two sites and the importance of technological affordances for understanding and explaining SNS selection.

Originality/value

This study extends previous cross-site U&G and non-use research by combining survey and behavioral data.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Mertcan Tascioglu, Jacqueline Kilsheimer Eastman and Rajesh Iyer

The purpose of the study is to investigate consumers’ perceptions of status motivations on retailers’ sustainability efforts and whether collectivism and materialism…

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2950

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate consumers’ perceptions of status motivations on retailers’ sustainability efforts and whether collectivism and materialism moderate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology using survey data was used. Data were collected by administering questionnaires from millennial respondents (n = 386) from the USA and Turkey.

Findings

The results show that cultural value (collectivism) and materialism can serve as moderators of the effects of status motivation and sustainability. The findings indicate that the link between status motivation and sustainability perceptions (both environmental and social sustainability) is stronger for more collectivist consumers. In terms of materialism, while it did not moderate the relationship between status motivation and perceptions of environmental sustainability, it did moderate the relationship between status motivation and perceptions of social sustainability, particularly the uniqueness aspect of materialism.

Research limitations/implications

The stronger link between status motivation and both environmental and social sustainability for collectivists suggests that the bandwagon effect may be impacting their need for status. The stronger link between status motivation and social sustainability for those more materialistic suggests that their need for status may be more impacted by a snob effect as they want to appear unique. The use of college students is a limitation of this study, and future research needs to explore a wider range of age groups to determine if there are generational differences. Additionally, future research could examine other cultural dimensions such as power distance and masculinity versus femininity.

Practical implications

Findings from this research provide insights for retailers, especially those targeting the status and luxury market when developing their sustainability plans. An interest in sustainability may aid consumers in meeting their need for status, particularly for those status consumers who are more collectivist, as a means to fit in with their group. For more materialistic consumers, retailers may want to focus more on unique social sustainability efforts that are more publicly noticeable.

Social implications

Social sustainability, a topic not studied as frequently as environmental sustainability, has significant implications for consumers. The findings suggest that the link between status motivation and social sustainability is stronger for collectivists, suggesting a bandwagon effect. Additionally, the authors find that the link between status motivation and social sustainability is stronger for materialists, particularly the uniqueness dimension of materialism, suggesting a snob effect.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the exploration of how status motivation impacts consumers’ perceptions of retailers’ environmental and social sustainability efforts and if these relationships are moderated by collectivism and materialism. Few studies have examined social sustainability, especially in terms of culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Vaughan Reimers, Bryce Magnuson and Fred Chao

Academic research and consumer polls often report strong consumer support for environmentally responsible products (ERPs), and yet the proportion of sales they account for…

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1725

Abstract

Purpose

Academic research and consumer polls often report strong consumer support for environmentally responsible products (ERPs), and yet the proportion of sales they account for is often comparatively small. The purpose of this paper is to address one of the purported reasons behind this “attitude-behaviour gap” by measuring the influence of six relatively untested factors on consumer attitudes towards environmentally responsible clothing (ERC).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a consumer household sample. It also used a quantitative survey approach to collect its data and structural equation modelling to analyse it.

Findings

Of the six factors, four were found to have a significant influence on consumer attitudes: altruism, status enhancement, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) and happiness.

Originality/value

Altruism, environmental concern, PCE and self-identity have consistently featured in other environmental contexts, but less so in the specific context of ERC. Happiness and status enhancement have yet to appear in any study relating to the purchase of ERPs.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Matti Haverila, Caitlin McLaughlin, Kai C. Haverila and Mehak Arora

Brand communities are an increasingly important way for brands to interact with their customers, as they give brands an opportunity to learn from and interact with people…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand communities are an increasingly important way for brands to interact with their customers, as they give brands an opportunity to learn from and interact with people with a demonstrated interest in the brand. Literature has explored the difference between lurkers and posters within these brand communities. However, there are other ways to segment members, just as there are many ways to segment customers of products and services – and this paper aims to be a step toward going beyond simple lurking vs posting behavior as a means of differentiating community members. As such, the purpose of this paper is to segment brand communities based on not only their participation behavior but also their identification with the brand community, loyalty and benefits gained from membership.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a cross-sectional survey of members of various brand communities in North America. Partial least squares structural equation modeling together with finite mixture partial least squares and prediction-oriented segmentation was used to discover the distinct segments of brand community members.

Findings

The findings indicate that there are two distinct segments that behave differently regarding their behavior, attitudes and motives. Segment one has a stronger relationship between identification and other outcomes and is also more motivated by social enhancement than segment two. Thus, it is clear that brand community members can be segmented and served based on more than their posting behavior.

Originality/value

The members of brand communities have often been thought of as homogeneous. This paper is unique in identifying heterogeneity among the members of the brand community and demonstrates the need for brand community managers to identify these differences and manage the brand community accordingly.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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