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Article

Darwish Abdulrahman Yousef

The present study aims to investigate the effects of a number of demographic and academic factors, such as gender, age, nationality (Emirati vs non-Emirati), high school…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the effects of a number of demographic and academic factors, such as gender, age, nationality (Emirati vs non-Emirati), high school major (arts vs science) and high school score, on the academic performance – measured by overall grade point average – of undergraduate students majoring in statistics at United Arab Emirates University.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes 188 undergraduate statistics students (142 female and 46 male) for the academic years 2012-2013 to 2015-2016. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the collected data.

Findings

The results indicate that gender, age and nationality have no significant impacts on the academic performance of undergraduate students in statistics bachelor’s degree program, while high school major and high school score do.

Research limitations/implications

This study had several limitations. First, only students of one university were included in this study, which would have limited the generalizability of the results. Second, the study focused on the impact of a limited number of factors on academic performance of undergraduate statistics students. But, the study has a number of implications for students, educators and university policy-makers.

Originality/value

The present study is the first attempt to explore the factors that might affect the academic performance of undergraduate students in statistics bachelor’s degree program in an Arabic setting.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Abstract

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Chinese Railways in the Era of High-Speed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-984-4

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Book part

K.J. Euske, Joseph San Miguel and Chong Wang

This research examines how the cost performance of defense contracts varies among the Air Force, Army, Navy, and the Department of Defense (DoD) and among five major

Abstract

This research examines how the cost performance of defense contracts varies among the Air Force, Army, Navy, and the Department of Defense (DoD) and among five major defense contractors: Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and General Dynamics. Data for these analyses was extracted from the recently established Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) web-based interface for management information on Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAP). Note that, in addition to the three military services, MDAP data is also reported for DoD itself.

Data analysis indicates that the Navy ranks last among the military services and DoD in cost performance for MDAP contracts, while the Air Force ranks best. Of the defense contractors, Raytheon ranks last in cost performance and General Dynamics is next to last. Furthermore, the Navy contracts more frequently with Raytheon and General Dynamics than do the other services or DoD. Explanatory factors for poor cost performance may be due to factors such as the Navy's lack of oversight, the quality of the acquisition workforce, the defense contractors’ cost inefficiency, ethical lapses, or weak corporate governance, or combinations of these factors.

In addition, the schedule performance data was also identified. Tests of statistical significance on the schedule performance difference generally yield no results except for one relationship which indicates that the Navy is more likely to have Acquisition Program Baseline (APB) schedule breaches than its counterparts. Finally, cost performance data is examined for statistically significant differences between the two major categories of defense contracts: fixed-price contracts and cost-plus contracts. However, no significant findings were discovered.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-754-3

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Article

Sushella N. Rao

According to an old saying, the best library in the world is one that is empty, for all its books have been borrowed. But modern libraries are bursting with books and…

Abstract

According to an old saying, the best library in the world is one that is empty, for all its books have been borrowed. But modern libraries are bursting with books and other resources and their burgeoning collections defy conventional stock‐taking. The unprecedented growth of knowledge in contemporary times has created complex problems and new challenges, not the least important of which is collection evaluation. This essay describes one way to meet this increasingly important problem by taking a new approach and creating a new model.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

John T. Quinn, Alan D. Olinsky, Phyllis A. Schumacher and Richard M. Smith

The Bryant University Mathematics Department has been collecting math placement scores and admissions data for all incoming freshmen for many years. In the past, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Bryant University Mathematics Department has been collecting math placement scores and admissions data for all incoming freshmen for many years. In the past, the authors have used these data mainly for placement in first-year classes and more recently to invite the most mathematically talented students to become mathematics majors. The purpose of this paper is to use the same data source to predict persistence in declared majors for all incoming students.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to categorize the students, the authors use cluster analysis, one of the tools of data mining, to see if students in particular majors share similar strengths based on the available data. The authors follow up this analysis by running a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to confirm that the means of the clusters are significantly different.

Findings

The cluster analysis resulted in five distinct clusters, which were confirmed by the results of the MANOVA. The authors also found how many students in each cluster persisted in their chosen major.

Originality/value

These results will help to improve counseling and proper placement of incoming freshmen. They will also be helpful in long-range planning of upper-level courses. Retention of students in their majors is an important concern for colleges and universities as it relates to planning issues, such as scheduling classes, particularly for upper classmen. This could also affect departmental requirements, such as the size of the faculty.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Essam Mansour

The purpose of this paper is attracting attention to the use of information by mosque speechmakers (MSs) in the Islamic and Arabic world, specifically in Upper Egypt.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is attracting attention to the use of information by mosque speechmakers (MSs) in the Islamic and Arabic world, specifically in Upper Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey, which was conducted from September to November 2019. A structured questionnaire was designed in Arabic and distributed to the mosques that were chosen as a sample to represent all the mosques of Upper Egypt. The researcher sampled 5% (n = 421) of the total of 8,421 mosques in Upper Egypt.

Findings

The findings showed the majority of the MSs in Upper Egypt are to be older (from 36 to 60 years, educated [mostly with BA degrees]), married and with an average monthly income over LE 3,500. Almost all MSs were strongly looking for information to make specific/general research, to make a religious lecture and be aware of contemporary events. The most frequently used sources of information by MSs were biographies, books, mass media, references and the Web. Most of the MSs had been using information heavily. The highest percentage of them spent from 7 to 12 h a week searching for information. MSs preferred the use of printed sources of information to those non-print sources. Mobile apps, followed by the Web and information databases were the most significant technological tools used by MSs. MSs’ efficiency level of using English was good and a reasonable number of them indicated that they were not good at speaking other languages, such as French. The home/personal library and the special library were the most important types of libraries used by MSs. The unaffected role of the library to access information, followed by the use of foreign languages to access some sources of information, as well as the use of technology, were the most significant problems faced by MSs when searching for information.

Research limitations/implications

This paper investigates the topic of MSs’ use of and access to information. This topic, unfortunately, has limited previous research, particularly in the Arabic and Islamic environment.

Practical implications

This paper provides valuable insight into the information behavior of a very significant client group, namely, MSs.

Originality/value

Being one of the very few studies conducted on these beneficiaries of information in the Arab and Islamic environment, this study is considered a unique one among several studies conducted in the area of the information-seeking behavior, especially with such a significant group of information users/seekers in such influencing environment in the world. The findings of this study may help in a better understanding of the information-seeking behavior of the MSs.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article

Darwish Abdulrahman Yousef

Although there are many studies addressing the learning styles of business students as well as students of other disciplines, there are few studies which address the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there are many studies addressing the learning styles of business students as well as students of other disciplines, there are few studies which address the learning style preferences of statistics students. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning style preferences of statistics students at a United Arab Emirates University (UAEU). Furthermore, it investigates whether there are statistically significant differences along the four dimensions of learning styles due to students’ demographic and academic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to the whole population which included 79 undergraduate statistics students at the UAEU, of which 69 returned the questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as frequencies and percentages were used to present the main characteristics of respondents and the results of the study. Additionally, a chi-square test was used to find out if there were significant differences along the four dimensions of learning style preferences due to students’ demographic and academic characteristics.

Findings

The results indicate that UAEU undergraduate statistics students have balanced preferences along the four dimensions of learning styles. Results also suggest that there are no statistically significant differences along the four dimensions of learning styles due to students’ demographic and academic characteristics, except in the active-reflective and sensing-intuitive dimensions with respect to high school type (private vs public).

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of limitations associated with this study. First, the findings of the study are based on data from only one university. Second, the sample was small and limited to undergraduate statistics students and, therefore, it excluded graduate students who might have had different experiences. Third, the results are based on a self-reported questionnaire and this, in turn, might have affected the reliability of the results On the other hand, it has a number of implications for educators and students. Educators will benefit from the results of this study in the sense that they will adopt teaching styles and strategies that match learning styles of the majority of their students. Students themselves will benefit from knowing their own learning style.

Originality/value

The present study is the first attempt to explore learning styles preference of undergraduate students not only in the UAE setting but also in the developing country setting.

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Article

Abubakar Hamid Danlami, Shri Dewi Applanaidu and Rabiul Islam

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the factors that influence households’ choice of cooking fuel in Bauchi State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the factors that influence households’ choice of cooking fuel in Bauchi State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 750 samples were selected using multistage area cluster sampling, of which 539 responses were analysed. Multinomial logit model was used to estimate the factors that determine a household’s main cooking fuel choice in Bauchi State, Nigeria.

Findings

The result has shown that income, location, price of firewood, hours of electricity supply and home ownership are among the factors that have a significant impact on influencing the type of cooking fuel to be adopted by households.

Research limitations/implications

The study cannot offer any explanation about the influence of time dimension on the pattern of household cooking fuel choice in the study area.

Practical implications

Implementation of policies to increase the income of households, ensuring the availability of clean cooking fuel source and the increase in the price of firewood will encourage households to switch from using firewood to using cleaner fuel sources such as kerosene, electricity and gas.

Originality/value

This study has contributed to the existing literature on household energy choice by conducting a micro-level analysis of households’ cooking fuel choice in Bauchi State where a similar study has not been conducted. The study developed approximately 13 hypotheses (out of which two were found to be irrelevant) and added one new variable to test the impact of the neighbourhood’s source of cooking fuel on households’ cooking fuel choice.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article

Darwish Abdulrahamn Yousef

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of teaching style, English language and communication and assessment methods on the academic performance of undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of teaching style, English language and communication and assessment methods on the academic performance of undergraduate business students in introductory quantitative courses such as Statistics for Business 1 and 2, Quantitative Methods for Business, Operations and Production Management and Operations Research in a non-Western setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 750 undergraduate business students in third- and fourth-year classes at the UAE University (UAEU). Descriptive statistics were used to gain some insights into the demographic and educational characteristics of respondents and their opinions regarding the importance of the three factors of concern to their understanding of quantitative courses material, along with multiple regression analysis that was used to test the hypotheses of the study.

Findings

The results of the present study indicate the importance of the teaching style in terms of the way the lecturer speaks and the pace of presenting the material, in addition to the structure of the lecture in understanding quantitative course material. Additionally, availability and contents of the material on the course website play an important role in helping undergraduate business students understand the subjects of quantitative courses. The study revealed that the UAEU undergraduate business students are, to some extent, uncomfortable in reading printed textbooks and writing reports on quantitative topics in English. The results of multiple regression analysis revealed that both teaching style and English language and communication have a great influence on the academic performance of UAEU undergraduate business students.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has a number of limitations. For instance, the sample was taken only from students in a single university. Moreover, this study focuses on the business students and in turn, it excludes students of other colleges. On the other hand, it has a number of implications for administrators, instructors and researchers. Administrators should pay special attention when setting admission standards. Instructors teaching quantitative courses should prepare well-structured lectures and deliver them at a reasonable pace to allow students the time to understand them. They should also pay attention to the way they speak. For researchers, this study will indicate the need for further research to confirm or refute the results of the present study.

Originality/value

The present study is the first attempt to investigate the impacts of the three factors of concern on the academic performance of undergraduate business students in introductory quantitative courses in a public university setting in the UAE context.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 10 no. 01
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Book part

Earl K. Stice, James D. Stice and Conan Albrecht

We use student-level online resource usage data for students in four different introductory accounting courses to explore the impact on exam performance of both student…

Abstract

We use student-level online resource usage data for students in four different introductory accounting courses to explore the impact on exam performance of both student study effort and students’ revealed preferences for reading text or watching video lectures. The online learning tool tracks student study choice (read text, watch video, or skip) on a paragraph-by-paragraph level. We match these usage data with student performance on course exams. We find that students who study more material earn higher exam scores than do students who study less material. We also find that students who self-select to do relatively more of their studying through reading text score higher on exams, on average, than do students who self-select to do relatively more of their studying through watching videos. Specifically, holding the overall amount of study constant, a student who chooses to spend the highest fraction of her or his study time watching video mini lectures earns exam scores 10 percentage points lower (six-tenths of a standard deviation) than a student who chooses to spend the lowest fraction of study time watching videos. Our results demonstrate that at least for introductory accounting students, increased study effort does indeed have a positive impact on exam performance. Our evidence also suggests that the highest performing introductory accounting students choose to learn accounting proportionately more through reading than through watching. These results are a reminder that when we talk about using “technology” to help our students learn accounting, the written word is still an important technology.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

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