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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Brett Bailey

Several emergency public health issues have a tremendous impact on and rely upon close coordination with law enforcement officials. Most interactions involve law…

Abstract

Several emergency public health issues have a tremendous impact on and rely upon close coordination with law enforcement officials. Most interactions involve law enforcement personnel providing security, crowd control, and/or traffic control during public health related incidents. However, as varied chemical and biological threats have emerged over the years, this interaction has increased to include joint investigations between the two disciplines. Certain biological threats, such as pandemics, pose direct threats to the law enforcement agency operations. Understanding the role of public health in emergencies, the overlapping missions, and the threats at all levels allows law enforcement professionals to better prepare themselves and their organizations for coordinating operations and maintaining continuity of law enforcement services.

Details

The Role of Law Enforcement in Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-336-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Vincent L. Marando and Alan C. Melchior

Contrary to the popular view of mandates as rigid and dictatorial mechanisms, this article advances a view of mandates as mechanisms for cooperation and negotiation. The…

Abstract

Contrary to the popular view of mandates as rigid and dictatorial mechanisms, this article advances a view of mandates as mechanisms for cooperation and negotiation. The relationship between several state and local actors is investigated in Maryland, particularly within the context of the development of a "loosely" mandated public health program, the Targeted Funding Program (TFP). An analysis of the TFP and the actors involved in the program's development demonstrates how this program is designed to achieve much more than increased fiscal responsibility. The TFP is designed, and continues to be redesigned, to meet the political and professional objectives of various elected and appointed officials at the state and local levels.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Laura Senier, Matthew Kearney and Jason Orne

This mixed-methods study reports on an outreach clinics program designed to deliver genetic services to medically underserved communities in Wisconsin.

Abstract

Purpose

This mixed-methods study reports on an outreach clinics program designed to deliver genetic services to medically underserved communities in Wisconsin.

Methodology/approach

We show the geographic distribution, funding patterns, and utilization trends for outreach clinics over a 20-year period. Interviews with program planners and outreach clinic staff show how external and internal constraints limited the program’s capacity. We compare clinic operations to the conceptual models guiding program design.

Findings

Our findings show that state health officials had to scale back financial support for outreach clinic activities while healthcare providers faced increasing pressure from administrators to reduce investments in charity care. These external and internal constraints led to a decline in the overall number of patients served. We also find that redistribution of clinics to the Milwaukee area increased utilization among Hispanics but not among African-Americans. Our interviews suggest that these patterns may be a function of shortcomings embedded in the planning models.

Research/Policy Implications

Planning models have three shortcomings. First, they do not identify the mitigation of health disparities as a specific goal. Second, they fail to acknowledge that partners face escalating profit-seeking mandates that may limit their capacity to provide charity services. Finally, they underemphasize the importance of seeking trusted partners, especially in working with communities that have been historically marginalized.

Originality/Value

There has been little discussion about equitably leveraging genetic advances that improve healthcare quality and efficacy. The role of State Health Agencies in mitigating disparities in access to genetic services has been largely ignored in the sociological literature.

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Anthony Tellez‐Marfin

From the symposium keynote address, this paper aims to explore how healthcare‐associated infections (HAIs) have been transformed from being only a hospital concern to a…

738

Abstract

Purpose

From the symposium keynote address, this paper aims to explore how healthcare‐associated infections (HAIs) have been transformed from being only a hospital concern to a much broader public health concern.

Design/ methodology/ approach

The paper is a narrative review.

Findings

HAIs have the characteristics that define issues as public health problems. As a result, public health departments can become important partners in the evolving hospital infection control field. However, whether all state health departments can afford to add HAI experts and whether current public health department HAI activities will be effective in preventing HAIs remain important questions.

Practical implications

Public health agencies must be selective about focusing limited resources into areas where they can protect and improve the public's health; whether HAIs are such an area remains to be seen. Although HAIs have historically been the focus of hospitals and hospital‐based services, public health involvement has been mandated through state and federal legislation. In theory, the new mandate is appropriate; in practice, its impact and value need to be comprehensively assessed.

Originality/value

The interdisciplinary team required to evaluate HAI mandatory public reporting comprehensively needs to start from an understanding of the history and concepts underlying public health practice.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Carroll L. Estes and Linda A. Bergthold

In the mid 1980s, amidst a massive restructuring of U.S. capital and a retrenchment of the welfare state, little attention has been paid to the ill‐defined “nonprofit” or…

Abstract

In the mid 1980s, amidst a massive restructuring of U.S. capital and a retrenchment of the welfare state, little attention has been paid to the ill‐defined “nonprofit” or “voluntary” service sector in the American economy. The Filer Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs characterised it in 1975 in the following way:

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Ray M. Nicola

The purpose of this paper is to show how the Turning Point Initiative to improve the health of populations by improving the USA public health system has many lessons on…

1020

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the Turning Point Initiative to improve the health of populations by improving the USA public health system has many lessons on collaboration for governance systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The article synthesizes published literature outlining the results of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/W.K. Kellogg Foundation grant program to 21 USA states and 43 communities and relationships to administrative practice.

Findings

Turning Point's creation of a formalized network of public health partners across the USA has led to innovations in collaboration, increased system capacity, and alternative structures for improving health.

Originality/value

Turning Point's efficacy in community health system improvement can be mirrored in clinical governance. A major potential for improvement in clinical delivery systems is available by re‐thinking key partners, organizational structures, and system administrative capacity.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Tara Ramanathan

The purpose of this paper is to inform healthcare providers and healthcare facility leadership about the statutory, administrative, criminal, and tort law implications…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform healthcare providers and healthcare facility leadership about the statutory, administrative, criminal, and tort law implications related to preventable harms from unsafe injection practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of legal theory and precedents.

Findings

The law can address disputes over unsafe injection practices in a variety of ways. Administrative agencies may hold a provider or facility responsible for preventable harms according to specific statutory and regulatory provisions governing licensure. State courts can compensate victims of certain actions or inactions based on tort law, where a breach of a legal duty caused damages. Prosecutors and the public can turn to criminal law to punish defendants and deter future actions that result in disability or death.

Research limitations/implications

The state law findings in this review are limited to legal provisions and court cases that are available on searchable databases. Due to the nature of this topic, many cases are settled out of court, and those records are sealed from the public and not available for review.

Practical implications

Preventable harm continues to occur from unsafe injection practices. These practices pose a significant risk of disease or even death for patients and could result in legal repercussions for healthcare providers and facility leadership.

Originality/value

This article reviews emerging law and potential legal implications for health care and public health related to unsafe medical practices related to needle, syringe, and vial use.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Hugh Breakey, William Ransome and Charles Sampford

This chapter explores the ethics of a critical vulnerability suffered by migrant health professionals (MHPs): the problem of ‘pathways to nowhere’. This problem arises…

Abstract

This chapter explores the ethics of a critical vulnerability suffered by migrant health professionals (MHPs): the problem of ‘pathways to nowhere’. This problem arises from dynamic change in the processes, practices and policies governing how migrant professionals achieve accreditation, training and employment in destination countries, whereby established pathways to professional practice are unexpectedly altered or removed. The authors detail the significance of this phenomenon in Australian and Canadian contexts. Drawing on the literature on legitimate expectations and the rule of law, the authors outline the ethical stakes and responsibilities that attach to states creating and then disappointing people’s legitimate expectations, and discuss how these considerations apply to destination countries’ treatment of MHPs.

Details

Ethics in a Crowded World: Globalisation, Human Movement and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-008-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Hugh V. McLachlan

Raises some questions on moral and legal rights to health care, referring to various claims contained within the report of the UK’s Commission on Social Justice – “Social…

Abstract

Raises some questions on moral and legal rights to health care, referring to various claims contained within the report of the UK’s Commission on Social Justice – “Social Justice: Strategies for National Renewal” (1994). Explores the relationship between needs and rights – rights of action and rights of recipience, moral rights and legal rights. Proceeds to delve into the role the state plays in providing services such as health care and whether or not people have a moral right to good health and good health care. Questions if the state should provide health care and, if so, should it be provided as a legal right to citizens? Concludes that the Commission on Social Justice fails to defend the National Health Service on the grounds of justice and moral rights.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Xiaochen Hu, Beidi Dong and Nicholas Lovrich

Previous studies consistently indicate that police agencies tend to use social media to assist in criminal investigations, to improve police-community relations and to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies consistently indicate that police agencies tend to use social media to assist in criminal investigations, to improve police-community relations and to broadcast both crime- and non-crime-related tips promotive of public safety. To date, little research has examined what content the police tended to post on their social media sites during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

By selecting the 14 most widely attended police agencies' Facebook accounts, the current study collects and analyzes a sample of 2,477 police Facebook postings between February 1 and May 31, 2020. By using a mix-method approach, the study addresses three research questions: 1) What kinds of messages did the police tend to post on their Facebook pages before and during this pandemic? 2) What types of COVID-related police Facebook postings were made? 3) How did the public react to COVID-19-related police Facebook postings?

Findings

The findings suggest that the police have come to believe that social media can be used as an effective police−public communicative tool in stressful times. The findings also suggest that social media platforms have become a routinized tool of police−public communications which can, to some appreciable extent, substitute for the in-person contacts traditionally relied upon in community policing.

Originality/value

This study of police use of social media explores the question of whether the use of these media can serve as an effective tool to connect the police with the public under circumstances where in-person contacts are greatly constrained. Some public policy implications emerging from the findings reported are discussed, along with implications for further research along these lines.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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