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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Kinga Zdunek, Mitch Blair and Denise Alexander

The Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) project recognises that child health policy is determined to a great extent by national culture; thus, exploring and…

Abstract

The Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) project recognises that child health policy is determined to a great extent by national culture; thus, exploring and understanding the cultural influences on national policies are essential to fully appraise the models of primary care. Cultures are created by the population who adopt national rituals, beliefs and code systems and are unique to each country. To understand the effects of culture on public policy, and the resulting primary care services, we explored the socio-cultural background of four components of policy-making: content, actors, contexts and processes. Responses from the MOCHA Country Agents about recent key national concerns and debates about child health and policy were analysed to identify the key factors as determinants of policy. These included awareness, contextual change, freedom, history, lifestyle, religion, societal activation and tolerance. To understand the influence of these factors on policy, we identified important internal and external structural determinants, which we grouped into those identified within the structure of health care policy (internal), and those which are only indirectly correlated with the policy environment (external). An important child-focused cultural determinant of policy is the national attitude to child abuse. We focused on the role of primary care in preventing and identifying abuse of children and young people, and treating its consequences, which can last a lifetime.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ridhwan Fontaine, Stanley Richardson and Yeap Peik Foong

This article revisits cross‐cultural management in Malaysia by challenging some fundamental assumptions. Most models of culture, such as Hofstede’s, assume that a country…

Abstract

This article revisits cross‐cultural management in Malaysia by challenging some fundamental assumptions. Most models of culture, such as Hofstede’s, assume that a country is reasonably homogeneous to make an analysis meaningful. We argue, conceptually and by providing empirical data that Malaysia is not a homogeneous country, and therefore Hofstede’s model is not suitable in Malaysia. Although this article deals with Malaysia specifically, there are a number of countries where Hofstede’s assumption might not work. In this context, we use Malaysia as an exemplar. We conclude that a better alternative is the model of Schwartz.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Rodrigue Fontaine and Stanley Richardson

This article takes stock of the state of cross‐cultural management in Malaysia. It first focuses on a number of problems that cross‐cultural management faces generally…

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Abstract

This article takes stock of the state of cross‐cultural management in Malaysia. It first focuses on a number of problems that cross‐cultural management faces generally, namely the lack of integrated knowledge and the possibility of subjectivity influencing the research design. Then the article looks at the state of cross‐cultural management research in Malaysia. It concludes that cross‐cultural management in Malaysia is, as yet, a series of “snapshots” with little follow‐up. Lastly, a number of themes for future research in Malaysia are proposed.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2008

Yeap Peik Foong and Stanley Richardson

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Fieldwork was conducted using participant observation and interviews. Participant observation was conducted to investigate the flow of information, the implementation of decisions made by the top Japanese managers, problem resolution, and the reaction of the local staff to management practices. The interviews highlighted communication problems which have existed between the Japanese CEO and the local telecommunications companies since the company started operations in 1997.

Findings

Even thought the company is backed by a financially strong parent company in Japan and has a lot of growth potential, this potential remains partially untapped due to management strategies of the company headquarters.

Research limitations/implications

Japan remains an important Foreign Direct Investment country in Malaysia. The perceptions of employees of Japanese companies in Malaysia are worth investigating since changes of management strategies in the home country affect the direction and operations of the overseas subsidiaries. Further research should be carried out in other Japanese companies in Malaysia.

Practical implications

Suggestions to improve the management strategies are discussed.

Originality/value

It is believed that no other Japanese company in Malaysia has been investigated in this way before. This paper's findings should be useful to many expatriate managers in Malaysia.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Rodrigue Fontaine and Stanley Richardson

Discusses various cultures around the world and examines some models of national culture particularly those of Hofstede and Schwartz. It reports some findings on cultural…

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Abstract

Discusses various cultures around the world and examines some models of national culture particularly those of Hofstede and Schwartz. It reports some findings on cultural differences between the main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indian) using an instrument based in part on Schwartz's seven dimensions. Further, differences between managers and their subordinates are examined. Two conclusions are that there are few significant differences in cultural values between the three ethnic groups but there are highly significant differences between subordinates and their superiors, in the sample of 324 Malaysians investigated.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Nick Bontis, William Chua Chong Keow and Stanley Richardson

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate the three elements of intellectual capital, i.e. human capital, structural capital, and customer capital, and their…

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Abstract

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate the three elements of intellectual capital, i.e. human capital, structural capital, and customer capital, and their inter‐relationships within two industry sectors in Malaysia. The study was conducted using a psychometrically validated questionnaire which was originally administered in Canada. The main conclusions from this particular study are that: human capital is important regardless of industry type; human capital has a greater influence on how a business should be structured in non‐service industries compared to service industries; customer capital has a significant influence over structural capital irrespective of industry; and finally, the development of structural capital has a positive relationship with business performance regardless of industry. The final specified models in this study show a robust explanation of business performance variance within the Malaysian context which bodes well for future research in alternative contexts.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Kok Wei Khong and Stanley Richardson

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is a management technique that radically rethinks and redesigns business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in business…

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Abstract

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is a management technique that radically rethinks and redesigns business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in business performance such as customer service and quality. The acceptance of BPR has been reinforced by the implementation of re‐engineering initiatives in many Malaysian banking institutions and the Central Bank of Malaysia, Bank Negara, is in favour of these initiatives. Nevertheless the effectiveness of BPR in this context has hitherto not been investigated. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of the critical success factors (CSFs) of BPR implementation process in the Malaysian banks and finance companies. Several hypotheses were tested concerning the relationships between the CSFs of the BPR implementation process and the performance of the enterprise, i.e. customer service performance and business performance. With the assistance of Institut Bank‐bank Malaysia (IBBM), 103 questionnaires were completed and analysed.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Abstract

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-726-4

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1935

OF old the public library was wont to take its reputation from the character of the newsroom. That room, as everyone knows, attracts every element in the community and it…

Abstract

OF old the public library was wont to take its reputation from the character of the newsroom. That room, as everyone knows, attracts every element in the community and it may be it attracts especially the poorer elements;—even at times undesirable ones. These people in some towns, but perhaps not so often now‐a‐days, have been unwashen and often not very attractive in appearance. It was natural, things being as they are, that the room should give a certain tone to the institution, and indeed on occasion cause it to be avoided by those who thought themselves to be superior. The whole level of living has altered, and we think has been raised, since the War. There is poverty and depression in parts of the country, it is true; but there are relief measures now which did not exist before the War. Only those who remember the grinding poverty of the unemployed in the days, especially the winter days, before the War can realise what poverty really means at its worst. This democratic levelling up applies, of course, to the public library as much as to any institution. At present it may be said that the part of the library which is most apparent to the public and by which it is usually judged, is the lending or home‐reading department. It therefore needs no apology if from time to time we give special attention to this department. Even in the great cities, which have always concentrated their chief attention upon their reference library, to‐day there is an attempt to supply a lending library service of adequate character. We recall, for example, that the Leeds Public Library of old was first and foremost a reference library, with a lending library attached; to‐day the lending library is one of the busiest in the kingdom. A similar judgment can be passed upon Sheffield, where quite deliberately the city librarian would restrict the reference library to works that are of real reference character, and would develop more fully the lending library. In Manchester, too, the new “Reference Library”—properly the new Central Library—has a lending library which issues about 1,500 volumes daily. There must be all over the country many libraries issuing up to a thousand volumes each a day from their central lending departments. This being the case the department comes in for very careful scrutiny.

Details

New Library World, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Joanna Gray

Section 3(1) of the Banking Act 1987 stipulates that:

Abstract

Section 3(1) of the Banking Act 1987 stipulates that:

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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