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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Stanley Petzall and Quentin Willis

Australia's increasing interest and orientation towards the Pacific‐Asian area and the need for more knowledge and understanding of differing cultural values and…

Abstract

Australia's increasing interest and orientation towards the Pacific‐Asian area and the need for more knowledge and understanding of differing cultural values and leadership styles in that area, motivated the present writers to study the leadership and managerial styles of both Australian and International managers. Also, this research was prompted by the need to provide a more extensive study compared with an earlier one, carried out in 1988, with a sample consisting exclusively of Australian managers. The 1988 study was reported in an earlier issue of Management Research News (Petzall and Willis, 1990).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Christopher Selvarajah and Stanley Petzall

This study examines the adjustment process and the adaptability of the Chinese migrant spouses’ in Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 97 spouses participated in a survey…

Abstract

This study examines the adjustment process and the adaptability of the Chinese migrant spouses’ in Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 97 spouses participated in a survey from a random sample of 200. The results suggest that both anticipatory and in‐country experiences are relevant to adjustment. The results of the study, specifically suggest that the adjustment process experienced by the Chinese spouses in the New Zealand environment is based on a number of factors such as (1) the amount of information and knowledge of New Zealand they have prior to arrival in New Zealand, (2) the backgrounds of the spouses, (3) their experiences prior to and on arrival in New Zealand, and (4) their ability to cope in the new environment.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Geoff Buxey and Stanley Petzall

The Australian vehicle industry has alwaysstruggled to remain viable despite relying heavilyon government protection. Now it faces theprospect of competing on its own…

Abstract

The Australian vehicle industry has always struggled to remain viable despite relying heavily on government protection. Now it faces the prospect of competing on its own merits, and has turned to JIT as one way to reduce manufacturing costs. However, the resultant exposure of the total supply network to the effects of isolated strikes has become a major concern. This article traces relevant events since JIT became commonplace. The gravity of the situation has forced the principal union and the motor corporations to co‐operate more, but there are fewer restraints on the other unions representing small groups in a host of supplier firms. Attempts are in train to address these structural difficulties too, but they have been greeted with some scepticism.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Bernard O'Meara and Stanley Petzall

The research presented here attempts to identify and analyse the reported selection criteria used in the appointment of Australian vice‐chancellors (VCs) and to contrast…

Abstract

Purpose

The research presented here attempts to identify and analyse the reported selection criteria used in the appointment of Australian vice‐chancellors (VCs) and to contrast this with the selection criteria actually used.

Design/methodology/approach

Contemporary research into the nature, role and purpose of section criteria in appointment processes has chiefly been conducted in the private sector and across various hierarchical levels. The research is based on a PhD entitled “The recruitment and selection of vice‐chancellors for Australian universities”. The research for the thesis had ethics approval and involved interviews with former and incumbent chancellors, VCs, consultants, representatives of the Australian Vice‐Chancellors Committee and selection panel members. Central to this research was the selection criteria and the skill bases selection criteria attempted to measure. A questionnaire was also sent to those listed above.

Findings

The findings show that a matching of organisational antecedents with candidate attributes does occur. The research also highlights the key selection criteria used to appoint VCs. It also demonstrates how these key criteria are universally applied but in different orders depending upon the various foci of universities. Non‐stated, but important, criteria and competencies are also discussed.

Originality/value

No other research exists outlining the skill sets and competencies required by Australian VCs. It is hoped that this research will form the basis for further research and discovery into this field that we know so little about.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Bernard O’Meara and Stanley Petzall

This article is based on recent Ph.D research. The practices for appointing Vice Chancellors (VC’s) in Australian Universities were examined, together with the changing…

Abstract

This article is based on recent Ph.D research. The practices for appointing Vice Chancellors (VC’s) in Australian Universities were examined, together with the changing role of the VC and new demographic patterns in VC backgrounds. A number of other issues were also examined, including the training and preparation of VC’s, mentoring and the changing skill base required to be effective in the role. In addition, the paradox was investigated of appointing academics from the ranks of individuals with non‐business backgrounds, to run large enterprises which are being compelled to adopt an increasingly business‐oriented focus.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Stanley Petzall and Quentin Willis

In an earlier study reported in the Journal of Educational Administration (17, 1, May 1979), Dufty and Williams analysed decision‐making procedures and managerial styles…

Abstract

In an earlier study reported in the Journal of Educational Administration (17, 1, May 1979), Dufty and Williams analysed decision‐making procedures and managerial styles of Heads of Departments (HODs) at WAIT, now Curtin University, and compared their findings with an earlier study by Dufty of business managers. Of the two groups, the former were found to be more likely to use participatory and power‐sharing procedures than the latter. However, a decade on, the present paper analyses the same two aspects of leader behaviour in a broader sample of HODs in professional and business organisations. In contrast with the Dufty and Williams study, evidence is presented to show a high level of commonality (and a low rating of basic differences) between professional and business leaders. It is proposed that leaders in both kinds of organisations tend to reveal more people‐related styles and preferences for participative procedures in decision‐making in their leadership of their people at work.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Bernard O'Meara and Stanley Petzall

This paper seeks to investigate the role of the university chancellor in the appointment of Australian vice‐chancellors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the role of the university chancellor in the appointment of Australian vice‐chancellors.

Design/methodology/approach

Prior to this research it was evident that little research had been undertaken on the role of the chancellor. While the chancellor chairs Council, the incumbent also presides over quite a complex selection process, including chairing the selection Panel, when the need to appoint a new VC arises. Research into the recruitment and selection practices used to appoint vice‐chancellors in Australia, undertaken as part of a PhD, yielded a wide range of useful material. The research also exposed some unexpected surprises, one of which was the role of the chancellor in the appointment process.

Findings

The chancellor not only appeared to lead these processes, as would be expected, but was viewed as the key, if not sole, person who determined the successful candidate. It was found that the relationship between the chancellor and vice‐chancellor was crucial and this was evident both in determining successful candidates and the decision for incumbents to seek a role elsewhere. However, in almost all cases the chancellor made the final decision when appointing a new VC. In some cases it appeared that selection panels considered their role as being simply to assist the chancellor to make a decision. This contrasted with the expectation that the panel as a whole would make a decision and recommend it to Council.

Originality/value

Thus understanding the role of the chancellor is important when considering university governance and VC succession. This paper provides the findings of the research highlighting the significance of the chancellor's role in the context of appointing a new VC.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Gladys Cheah‐Liaw, Stanley Petzall and Chris Selvarajah

Examines human resource management (HRM) for successful Australian‐Malaysian joint ventures (JVs), on the basis of survey data and case studies. The findings suggest that…

Abstract

Examines human resource management (HRM) for successful Australian‐Malaysian joint ventures (JVs), on the basis of survey data and case studies. The findings suggest that each phase of JV development had its own pattern of HR practices. Three phases of development were distinguished – initiation, transitional, and maturational. The first phase involved selecting, recruiting and training a skilled workforce and formulating rudimentary human resource policies. Cultural differences were most marked in this phase. The second phase, after three years of operation, involved evolution of human resource policies better suited to local conditions, and more polycentric management staffing. The final phase, after six years of operation, saw the development of a distinctive human resources system, and the minimisation of cultural differences as an operational issue. In this phase there was also a move to more geocentric management staffing. Other HR issues discussed are changing roles and relationships between JV partners in the different phases of development, and factors for JV success in the context of Australian‐Malaysian JVs.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Bernard O'Meara and Stanley Petzall

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key demographics and social characteristics of Vice‐Chancellors of Australian universities so that an accurate profile of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key demographics and social characteristics of Vice‐Chancellors of Australian universities so that an accurate profile of Vice‐Chancellors can be established. At present, there is no contemporary profile of incumbents despite the high level of responsibility associated with these roles.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used in the research that required the collation and analysis of public domain material regarding vice‐chancellors. Multiple sources were used in order to ensure depth, breadth and accuracy of data collected. A questionnaire that was used as part of the PhD research allowed new data to be accessed and existing data verified. Finally, interviews with various incumbents allowed pertinent information to be discussed where applicable.

Findings

The research outlines the changes in the roles of Vice‐Chancellors that have occurred since 1960. The changes in the role reflect changes in government policy and social trends. Further, the research demonstrates that incumbents are now chief executive officers and require a broader range of business competencies and academic experience compared to their predecessors in order to meet contemporary challenges. These changes are reflected in the demographics and social characteristics of incumbents.

Originality/value

This paper addresses this gap in knowledge and provides information about the people who are appointed vice‐chancellors. The research gives an insight into all incumbents between 1960 and 2000 and where possible, examples of post‐2000 trends have also been given. The creation of this profile will allow further and more in‐depth research to be undertaken.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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