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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1949

Stanley H. Evans

REPRESENTING America's latest bid for the twin‐engined medium range civil transport world market—hitherto largely monopolized by the ubiquitous Douglas DC‐3 —the…

Abstract

REPRESENTING America's latest bid for the twin‐engined medium range civil transport world market—hitherto largely monopolized by the ubiquitous Douglas DC‐3 —the Consolidated‐Vultee 300 m.p.h., 40‐passenger, pressurized ‘Convair‐Liner’ is now making its debut in regular airline service. Three basic airline types are now on the production lines, differing mainly in the location and type of passenger‐loading facility and baggage compartments: thus type (a) has an integral stairway, with the door located on the right side, ahead of the wing; type (b) an. integral stairway, with the door located in the after belly of the fuselage; and type (c) the more conventional door arrangement located on the left side, aft of the wing. Executive versions are also being produced to meet individual customer preferences.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1950

Stanley H. Evans

IN the Douglas Super DC‐3 twin‐engined commercial transport, now being demonstrated throughout North and South America, may be seen an instructive example of what has come…

Abstract

IN the Douglas Super DC‐3 twin‐engined commercial transport, now being demonstrated throughout North and South America, may be seen an instructive example of what has come to be known in the aircraft industry as ‘bread‐and‐butter engineering’—the extension of the normal life‐span of a well‐tried design by rebuilding to modern operational and airworthiness standards. The ubiquitous DC‐3, from which the ‘super’ version is derived, has itself long been the bread‐and‐butter work‐horse of the air transport world, but its days are numbered under promulgated I.C.A.O. regulations which become operative in 1953. By rebuilding and modernizing the DC‐3 to international civil airworthiness standards, Douglas are out to show operators that the Super DC‐3 is the logical post‐war replacement in the twin‐engined short‐haul category.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 22 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1937

H.B. Irving

THE change from the parallel wings of the now obsolescent biplane to the tapered wings of the monoplane, usually fitted with flaps, raised a great number of problems, both…

Abstract

THE change from the parallel wings of the now obsolescent biplane to the tapered wings of the monoplane, usually fitted with flaps, raised a great number of problems, both aerodynamic and structural. Work on these has been pursued vigorously during the past few years, but the designer is still some considerable distance from having all his questions answered. For instance, further information is required as to the relation between wing thickness and profile drag before it can be decided what is the maximum thickness which can be used, taking both aero‐dynamical and structural considerations into account. This question is complicated by the fact that, so far as the tip sections are concerned,. the indications are that the thickness ratio has important effects on the nature of the stall, violent or gentle. So, too, will such factors as centre line camber and position of maximum ordinate affect the nature of the stall in greater or Jess degree. Added to these factors there is, of course, the important one of the taper itself, including—as is now realised—the question as to the way in which the tapering is done, that is, whether by sweeping the trailing edge forward or the leading edge back, or, as is more usual, a combination of the two.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library…

Abstract

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties. Anything that Mr. Jast has to say is said with originality even if the subject is not original; his quality has always been to give an independent and novel twist to almost everything he touches. We think our readers will find this to be so when he touches the important question of “The Library and Leisure.”

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New Library World, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Karen Lucas and Julia Markovich

Purpose — This chapter reviews the key findings of the reported research in this volume using the wider international literatures on transport and social exclusion as its…

Abstract

Purpose — This chapter reviews the key findings of the reported research in this volume using the wider international literatures on transport and social exclusion as its conceptual framework. It begins by briefly summarising the research and policy context in which the study is set. It then provides an overview of major conceptual, theoretical and methodological advancements relevant to this area over the last 10 years in order to evaluate the study’s contribution to research, policy and practice internationally.

Methodology — The conceptual framework for this chapter is based on a comprehensive review of the international literatures on transport and social exclusion. After a brief introduction to these, it outlines key conceptual, theoretical and methodological advancements as they pertain to transport-related social exclusion. In addition, it evaluates the scope and implications of the methodological approach with particular reference to contemporary scholarly debates in this area. The chapter subsequently explores the applicability of the research in policy and practice, both inside and outside the Australian context.

Findings — The chapter concludes that the research has made a significant contribution to conceptual, theoretical and methodological developments within the area of transport-related exclusion, and has helped move forward related debates within policy circles. Opportunities for further research are also identified.

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New Perspectives and Methods in Transport and Social Exclusion Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-052200-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1950

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a…

Abstract

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a circumstance which some may have overlooked in their pride and enthusiasm for the public library. But no real librarian of any type will fail to rejoice in the progress to which the celebration is witness. For that has been immense. We are to have a centenary history of the Public Library Movement—that is not its title—from the Library Association. We do not know if it will be available in London this month; we fear it will not. We do know its author, Mr. W. A. Munford, has spent many months in research for it and that he is a writer with a lucid and individual Style. We contemplate his task with a certain nervousness. Could anyone less than a Carlyle impart into the dry bones of municipal library history that Strew these hundred years, the bones by the wayside that mark out the way, the breath of the spirit that will make them live ? For even Edward Edwards, whose name should be much in the minds and perhaps on the lips of library lovers this month, could scarcely have foreseen the contemporary position ; nor perhaps could Carlyle who asked before our genesis why there should not be in every county town a county library as well as a county gaol. How remote the days when such a question was cogent seem to be now! It behoves us, indeed it honours us, to recall the work of Edwards, of Ewart, Brotherton, Thomas Greenwood, Nicholson, Peter Cowell, Crestadoro, Francis Barrett, Thomas Lyster, J. Y. M. MacAlister, James Duff Brown and, in a later day without mentioning the living, John Ballinger, Ernest A. Baker, L. Stanley Jast, and Potter Briscoe—the list is long. All served the movement we celebrate and all faced a community which had to be convinced. It still has, of course, but our people do now allow libraries a place, more or less respected, in the life of the people. Librarians no longer face the corpse‐cold incredulity of the so‐called educated classes, the indifference of the masses and the actively vicious hostility of local legislators. Except the illuminated few that existed. These were the men who had the faith that an informed people was a happier, more efficient one and that books in widest commonalty spread were the best means of producing such a people. These, with a succession of believing, enduring librarians, persisted in their Struggle with cynic and opponent and brought about the system and the technique we use, modified of course and extended to meet a changing world, but essentially the same. Three names we may especially honour this September, Edward Edwards, who was the sower of the seed; MacAlister, who gained us our Royal Charter ; and John Ballinger, who was the person who most influenced the introduction of the liberating Libraries Act of 1919.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1934

THIS is the time of the year when, with the strong opening of the Spring publishing season, librarians take a review of matters which definitely concern books. There is a…

Abstract

THIS is the time of the year when, with the strong opening of the Spring publishing season, librarians take a review of matters which definitely concern books. There is a cant saying amongst certain eager librarians that their colleagues are too concerned with technical matters and too little, if at all, concerned with books. There may have been isolated cases of this kind, but it is merely untrue to say that the average librarian is not concerned, deeply and continuously, with the literary activity of his day. It is well that men should live in their own time and be thoroughly interested in the work of new writers. There is danger that exclusive occupation with them may lead to an unbalanced view of the book world. If one judged from the criticisms that occasionally appear in our contemporaries, one would suppose that the only books that mattered were the authentic fiction of the day, and by authentic is meant the books which go beyond average contemporary thought and conventions. Librarianship, however, is concerned with all books of all subjects and of all time. This note is merely a prelude to a number of THE LIBRARY WORLD which deals mainly with literature and with reading. Here we return again to the perennial fiction question.

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New Library World, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

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Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1950

THE interval between the Library Association Conference and the printing of THE LIBRARY WORLD is too brief for more than a series of impressions of it. Comment is probably…

Abstract

THE interval between the Library Association Conference and the printing of THE LIBRARY WORLD is too brief for more than a series of impressions of it. Comment is probably preferable in our pages to mere record. The Association is publishing in the next few weeks all the papers that were read and, as we hope, the substance at least of the unwritten contributions. In this second particular reports in recent years have been lacking. A report that merely states that “Mr. Smith seconded the vote of thanks” is so much waste of paper and interests no one but Mr. Smith. If Mr. Smith, however, said anything we should know what it was he said. What we may say is that the Conference was worthy of the centenary we were celebrating. The attendance, over two thousand, was the largest on record, and there has not been so large a gathering of overseas librarians and educationists since the jubilee meeting of the Library Association at Edinburgh in 1927. So much was this so that the meeting took upon it a certain international aspect, as at least one of the non‐librarian speakers told its members, adding that it was apparently a library league of nations of the friendliest character. It followed that an unusual, but quite agreeable, part of each general session was devoted to speeches of congratulation and good‐will from the foreign delegates. All, with the possible exception of the United States, dwelt upon the debt of their countries in library matters to the English Public Libraries Acts and their consequences. Even Dr. Evans, in a very pleasant speech, showed that he had reached some tentative conclusions about English librarianship.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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