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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Hubert S. Feild and Stanley G. Harris

To enhance the development of individuals for executive positions,fast‐track management development programmes have been adopted by manyorganisations. However, such…

Abstract

To enhance the development of individuals for executive positions, fast‐track management development programmes have been adopted by many organisations. However, such programmes do not always lead to positive consequences for the participant. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the frustrations of participants in an entry‐level fast‐track programme. Results of the study suggest several important lessons for those responsible for fast‐track programmes. First, participants′ major frustrations involved issues regarding ongoing career guidance, future job assignment uncertainty, and the degree of challenge, responsibility, and variety inherent in their job assignments. Second, participants are likely to have high expectations for themselves and their careers which must be considered. Third, company executives and programme supervisors may misjudge the frustrations of participants; therefore, monitoring such frustrations is important.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Daniel T. Holt, Achilles A. Armenakis, Stanley G. Harris and Hubert S. Feild

Although the measurement of organizational readiness for change has been encouraged, measuring readiness for change poses a major empirical challenge. This is not because…

Abstract

Although the measurement of organizational readiness for change has been encouraged, measuring readiness for change poses a major empirical challenge. This is not because instruments designed to do this are not available. Researchers, consultants, and practitioners have published an array of instruments, suggesting that readiness can be measured from various perspectives and the concept of readiness has not been clearly defined. This paper reviews the history of the readiness concept, the perspectives used to assess readiness, and the psychometric properties of readiness instruments. Based on the review, an integrated definition of readiness is presented along with the implications of the definition for research and practice.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Stanley G. Harris and Eric B. Gresch

Heightened levels of emotions, often negative, accompany the prospect and implementation of organizational changes. The failure to manage the emotions of change is cited…

Abstract

Heightened levels of emotions, often negative, accompany the prospect and implementation of organizational changes. The failure to manage the emotions of change is cited as a reason for implementation problems and resistance to change. In this chapter, we examine the influences and consequences of emotions in the context of a large merger. Specifically, we examine the relationships between three cognitive assessments of the merger and the emotional reaction of pleasure toward the merger. With regard to consequences, we explore how pleasure with the merger relates to the length and affective tone of written suggestions for organizational improvements and postmerger attitudes of job satisfaction and turnover intention. Implications of our results are drawn for both scholars and organizational change agents.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Dynamism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-177-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Stanley G. Harris and Hubert S. Feild

Despite their fairly widespread use among large companies, littleinformation is available to those interested in designing, managing, orevaluating high‐potential…

Abstract

Despite their fairly widespread use among large companies, little information is available to those interested in designing, managing, or evaluating high‐potential (fast‐track) management development programmes. In an attempt to fill this void, three sources of programme ineffectiveness are examined: participants′ dissatisfaction, the negative attitudes of non‐participants, and cultural misfit. Also examines ten ineffectiveness‐avoiding lessons for programme design and implementation learned during an in‐depth assessment of one company′s formalized, entry‐level high‐potential management development programme

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Stanley G. Harris and Michael S. Cole

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic literature as a useful framework for understanding the dynamics of motivation to change problem behaviors, in a leadership development context.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of over 70 supervisors/managers was studied over a period of nine months as they participated in a company‐sponsored leadership development effort.

Findings

Results provide initial evidence that the stages of change model has the potential for being reliably and validly assessed in a leadership development context. Participants' stage scores related in meaningful ways to relevant criteria such as job attitudes, perceptions of personal leadership areas needing improvement, and evaluations of actual development module content and presentation over a nine‐month period.

Research limitations/implications

Participants were drawn from only one organization and this was the first major leadership development effort undertaken by this organization.

Practical implications

Study results provide support for the appropriateness of applying the stages of change model and its measurement in a leadership development context. Results demonstrate that the stages of change model appears to offer useful and pragmatic insight into motivation to learn and on improving the effectiveness of leadership development activities.

Originality/value

The present study is unique in that makes use of a stages of change model to empirically examine differential patterns of relationships between participants' stages of change and their organizational attitudes, leadership developmental needs, and longitudinal reactions to the development effort.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Jeffrey J. Haynie, Stanley G Harris and Christopher Brian Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of core self-evaluations (CSE) and change uncertainty on job satisfaction and turnover intentions within the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of core self-evaluations (CSE) and change uncertainty on job satisfaction and turnover intentions within the context of an organizational change. Because individuals high in CSE are expected to be able to cope better with uncertainty, the authors also tested the mitigating effect of CSE on the change uncertainty-attitude relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were completed and returned by 398 employees in the midst of a merger containing measures of CSE, change uncertainty, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. The survey was voluntary and administered cross-sectionally.

Findings

Change uncertainty was found to negatively influence job satisfaction and positively influence turnover intentions. Additionally, CSE positively impacted job satisfaction and negatively impacted turnover intentions. High CSE was also found to minimize the negative impact of examined change uncertainty-job attitude relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The research has implications for the role of CSE in attitude formation within a change context and adds to existing literature supporting the detrimental effects of change uncertainty on job attitudes. Also, the study provided evidence of how CSE interacts with change uncertainty reducing the detrimental impact on job attitudes. Future research should continue to examine the role of CSE in the way employees react to other change-related stressors.

Originality/value

The relationships among change uncertainty, CSE, and job attitudes were explored through a theoretical lens and tested empirically using employees in the midst of an organizational change.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Michael S. Cole, Stanley G. Harris and Jeremy B. Bernerth

The purpose of this paper was to examine the interaction effects of managers' perceptions of the supporting vision clarity, appropriateness, and execution of a major…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the interaction effects of managers' perceptions of the supporting vision clarity, appropriateness, and execution of a major organizational change on their job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, and role ambiguity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from upper and middle‐level managers of a Fortune 500 US manufacturer and maker of consumer goods involved in a large organizational change initiative. A survey was completed by 217 managers, for a response rate of 89 percent. Change attitudes, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, role ambiguity, and control variables were all assessed.

Findings

A three‐way interaction between change vision clarity, change appropriateness, and change execution was found to predict managers' job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and role ambiguity.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on self‐reports collected at one point in time, allowing for the possibility of common method bias. The complex, nonlinear relationships indicate that method bias cannot fully account for the reported relationships.

Practical implications

Study results illustrate that the individual experience of major change is multifaceted and that simultaneously considering the combined effects of individual's change attitudes including readiness (in the form of believing a change is needed and appropriate) and the perceived effectiveness of the change execution on key job‐related outcomes can help practitioners understand more fully the implications of organizational change.

Originality/value

The findings lend support to the notion that individual's sentiments concerning organizational change are interactive and should not be ignored.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Achilles A. Armenakis and Stanley G. Harris

Explains how we used the change message components of discrepancy, appropriateness, efficacy, principal support, and personal valence and the message conveying strategies…

Abstract

Explains how we used the change message components of discrepancy, appropriateness, efficacy, principal support, and personal valence and the message conveying strategies of active participation, persuasive communication and management of information suggested by Armenakis and colleagues to help an organization create readiness for a major reorganization. We describe and evaluate our experiences from our initial coaching with the president, through initial management meetings to determine the new business unit’s strategy and structure, to the initial company‐wide announcement of the plans. We conclude with a set of observations and lessons and suggestions for future research on the use of the change message framework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2000

Achilles A. Armenakis, Stanley G. Harris and Hubert S. Feild

Increasing global competition has accelerated the rate of organizational changes, such as reengineering, restructuring, and downsizing. As a result, organizational leaders…

Abstract

Increasing global competition has accelerated the rate of organizational changes, such as reengineering, restructuring, and downsizing. As a result, organizational leaders find themselves faced with growing cynicism among employees that the current wave of changes is nothing more than the program of the month that will pass as those that preceded it. We address the issue of how to make changes permanent by providing a model developed from theory and research on organizational change and from successful practices implemented in numerous organizations worldwide. The model can serve at least three purposes. First, the model can assist change agents in planning for and assessing progress toward institutionalizing organizational change. Second, the model can help focus efforts of organizational scholars to study the change process. Third, the model offers the basis for hypothesis testing regarding the success or failure of change efforts.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-041-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Melinda J. Milligan

This paper broadens and extends the idea of organizational death by arguing that certain organizational site moves, those in which employees hold a strong place attachment…

Abstract

This paper broadens and extends the idea of organizational death by arguing that certain organizational site moves, those in which employees hold a strong place attachment to the to be left, are a form of organizational death. It argues for the utility of viewing organizational change as involving loss and including space in studies of everyday organizational experiences. Using ethnographic research (participant‐observation and in‐depth interviews with the employees) of one such organization (the “Coffee House”) and a negotiated‐order perspective, discusses employee beliefs as to how the site move should have been managed as a means to document their understanding of the move as a loss experience and as a form of organizational death.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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