Search results

1 – 9 of 9
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Stanley F. Stasch

Based upon a study of between fifty to sixty case examples of new venture start‐ups, the author presents a screening procedure for entrepreneurs to use when evaluating…

Abstract

Based upon a study of between fifty to sixty case examples of new venture start‐ups, the author presents a screening procedure for entrepreneurs to use when evaluating whether a proposed low‐budget marketing strategy for a new venture shows promise of being successful. The procedure consists of four sets of screening conditions. A well‐designed marketing strategy should have a reasonably good chance of being successful if it (1) will tightly integrate the product/service and price offerings, the intended distribution method, and the intended promotion plan with the new venture’s designated target market, (2) will encounter no serious marketing strategy execution difficulties which cannot be resolved, (3) uses marketing concepts which can be executed with a small marketing budget, and (4) displays three characteristics believed to be strongly associated with marketing strategies that are successful over the long term.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

John L. Ward and Stanley F. Stasch

This paper addresses the question of when market leaders are most likely to be attacked. It does so by discussing the circumstances associated with competitors' attacks on…

Abstract

This paper addresses the question of when market leaders are most likely to be attacked. It does so by discussing the circumstances associated with competitors' attacks on 21 market leaders. These circumstances and the 21 competitive encounters are used to present a twelve‐point checklist which market leaders can use in answering the title question.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Stanley F. Stasch and Ronald T. Lonsdale

According to most textbooks, the widely accepted Booz, Allen and Hamilton (BAH) conceptual framework is supposedly the best way to go through the new product development…

Abstract

According to most textbooks, the widely accepted Booz, Allen and Hamilton (BAH) conceptual framework is supposedly the best way to go through the new product development process. That is, the textbooks imply that companies will achieve the best results if they follow the BAH conceptual framework. The authors studied ten new products to identify how marketing research was utilized during their development and introduction. The actual “practice” of marketing research usage was then compared with the BAH framework. The comparison showed that marketing research usage in practice was noticeably different from the usage implied by the BAH conceptual framework, thus suggesting that the latter does not hold up perfectly. The authors offer some suggestions as to when the conceptual framework for marketing research usage should be modified, and what the nature of those modifications might be.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

Stanley F. Stasch and John L. Ward

Empirical research on successful and unsuccessful marketingstrategies indicates that smaller‐share firms in established marketshave difficulty gaining market share…

Abstract

Empirical research on successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies indicates that smaller‐share firms in established markets have difficulty gaining market share profitability. An empirically based framework of questions to guide the managers of such firms when evaluating an aggressive marketing strategy they have under consideration is presented. A literature review of the prescriptions for smaller‐share firms basically suggests the two strategies of differentiation and/or focus on faster growing segments. The authors research of 31 case histories offers several more strategic recommendations for the management of smaller‐share firms.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 7 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

John L. Ward and Stanley F. Stasch

Can small‐share firms step out of the shadow of the market leader? Yes. Here is how to evaluate a strategy's potential success.

Abstract

Can small‐share firms step out of the shadow of the market leader? Yes. Here is how to evaluate a strategy's potential success.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Stanley F. Stasch, Ronald T. Lonsdale and Noel M. LaVenka

Describes a study reviewing recent histories of new product ideasin order to devise a framework of their sources. Proposes aclassification of sources for new product ideas…

Abstract

Describes a study reviewing recent histories of new product ideas in order to devise a framework of their sources. Proposes a classification of sources for new product ideas through laboratory, management, company situation, distribution, supplier, consumer, marketplace, foreign products, and government regulations. Surmises that successful innovation requires an understanding of the sources of new ideas, and that the proposed framework is more effective than other paradigms.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Frank G. Bingham and Charles J. Quigley

Proposes a new product implementation process which is designed toreduce the risk inherent in new product introductions in consumermarkets. Defines the stages of this…

Abstract

Proposes a new product implementation process which is designed to reduce the risk inherent in new product introductions in consumer markets. Defines the stages of this process as idea generation, idea screening, conceptual development and testing, business analysis, product development, test market, and product introduction. Concludes that this process differs from previous models in suggesting a team be created to manage the development, speeding up the tasks in each stage.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Charles S. Madden and Marjorie J. Caballero

From a series of more than 70 depth interviews with constituencies inside and outside the specialty advertising industry, a profile of perceptions concerning the industry…

Abstract

From a series of more than 70 depth interviews with constituencies inside and outside the specialty advertising industry, a profile of perceptions concerning the industry has emerged. Specialty distributors, suppliers, and users as well as media representatives, ad agency personnel, and advertising educators contributed valuable insights into specialty advertising's strengths and weaknesses. This article summarizes the prevailing perceptions concerning the industry and discusses ways in which businesses that use specialty advertising could sort through these perceptions and make effective use of this business‐to‐business form of promotion.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

B.J. Holdnak, Tanya C. Clemons and Stephen C. Bushardt

The evaluation of training programmes is discussed: objectives mustbe defined and a proper experimental design must be used. The articledescribes a field study in…

Abstract

The evaluation of training programmes is discussed: objectives must be defined and a proper experimental design must be used. The article describes a field study in “Self‐esteem Training” which was also used to examine the application of the Solomon four group design. It was shown that although the participants in the study were unqualified in their support for the programme, the evaluation revealed that it did not have the desired effect on job satisfaction and organisational commitment.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9