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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Stanley Bach

In October 1991, Zambia experienced its first competitive elections in 23 years. These elections for both the presidency and the National Assembly were expected to mark…

Abstract

In October 1991, Zambia experienced its first competitive elections in 23 years. These elections for both the presidency and the National Assembly were expected to mark the end of one‐party rule and the beginning of a new regime of multi‐party politics. In the aftermath of the elections, some also expressed the hope or expectation that the transition starting to take place in Zambia would inspire a movement elsewhere in sub‐Saharan Africa away from authoritarian regimes or regimes effectively immune from electoral accountability. In fact, even some Zambians drew hopeful comparisons between what was occurring in Lusaka and the democratic transformations that had begun several years earlier in Central and Eastern Europe.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

I HAVE sometimes been asked whether I am conscious, as the present editor of THE LIBRARY WORLD, of the spirit and influence of its founder, James Duff Brown, and of his…

Abstract

I HAVE sometimes been asked whether I am conscious, as the present editor of THE LIBRARY WORLD, of the spirit and influence of its founder, James Duff Brown, and of his editorial successors, who included J. D. Stewart and W. C. Berwick Sayers. The answer is that of course I am—how could it be otherwise?

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1957

OUR fifty‐ninth volume is opened by this issue of the Library World, which has survived longer than any other independent library periodical. Some reflections, which may…

Abstract

OUR fifty‐ninth volume is opened by this issue of the Library World, which has survived longer than any other independent library periodical. Some reflections, which may indeed seem repetitive, seem to be natural in the circumstances. We have a sense of gratitude to the number of readers, who as writers and subscribers have sustained us so long and will we trust continue to do so. From the first we have adhered closely to the thesis that our business was with the conduct of libraries and the activities, even personal ones, of librarians but not with their private affairs. We have endeavoured to initiate and to describe methods many of which are now commonplace in their acceptance. Thus J. D. Brown our founder and first Editor published in this his series on charging systems; Louis Stanley Jast his serial on his own cataloguing methods; Dr. E. A. Baker made known his views on the annotation of books; J. D. Stewart and Berwick Sayers wrote for those pages their study, afterwards published as the book The Card Catalogue—these are a few examples. The lighter forms of librarianship writing may be said to have been initiated in this country in our pages, for example the reports of the Pseudonyms' meetings which, it must be confessed, have a vague relation only to what actually took place at them; and the over‐thirty years' serial, Letters on Our Affairs, initiated in 1913 by one who became a world famous librarian, established, especially in its first decade, this style of critical writing which has had so many imitators.

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New Library World, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Robert W. Nason

The purpose of this paper is to explore the elements of the life of Professor Stanley C. Hollander (1919‐2004), a marketing scholar extraordinaire.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the elements of the life of Professor Stanley C. Hollander (1919‐2004), a marketing scholar extraordinaire.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 28 marketing scholars who had been students, colleagues, and friends of Professor Hollander were asked to contribute to the author's personal knowledge of him. Selma Hollander (his wife) was interviewed. Stan Hollander's own written work was reviewed for insight into his characteristics.

Findings

A brief chronology of his life is provided as a framework within which his personal characteristics and relationships can be examined. The major contributors to his success as a person and scholar are first, the relationship with his wife, Selma; second, the characteristics of his intellect; and third, his fascination with the arts. The result was not only an uncommon scholar considered a giant in the field of marketing but also one who enabled many others through the sharing of his mind and his humor.

Originality/value

This work explores the man behind the body of scholarship and disciplinary development that is his legacy. He was an uncommon scholar.

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Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Charles D. Patterson

Thoughts of those situations I have been in that might find me on a deserted island quickly cross my mind and of these, one stands out as a genuine possibility. I was in…

Abstract

Thoughts of those situations I have been in that might find me on a deserted island quickly cross my mind and of these, one stands out as a genuine possibility. I was in the army. The adjustment to living openly in a barracks with one hundred or so other young men without an inch of privacy had not been easily made. Basic training in the infantry had kept me busy, on edge, and very tired; consequently, there was no time for reading or thinking. I was not supposed to think. When the long awaited and eagerly sought first “pass” was granted, I was content to get to a quiet place off the post and just stare into space, contemplating what the future might hold and, indeed, whether or not I would survive to have a future. I am forever grateful to Lucille Hatch who gave me permission to practice on the organ at the First Methodist Church in Santa Maria, California, and this I did on many occasions. I had been in the army only four months but this was sufficient time for me to have become thoroughly indoctrinated in the ways of making war. There had been the discipline, the lectures and training movies, the drills and maneuvers, the simulated games, the mock‐ups and the bivouacs. All were planned, designed, and executed to make me a killer in combat, and, if not killed, able to survive under the most adverse and difficult conditions in a land totally foreign to my way of thinking and living. I had had all of the necessary physical examinations and the required “shots” for travel outside the United States, and with “kill or be killed” ringing in my ears, I found myself en route overseas.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Janine Pierce

Peace on Earth has often been elusive, with more times on Earth spent at war rather than peace. This paper examines the nature of peace with its antithesis of war

Abstract

Peace on Earth has often been elusive, with more times on Earth spent at war rather than peace. This paper examines the nature of peace with its antithesis of war, focussing on the impact of war on the planet, which is not a primary consideration when war is waged. War leaves negative planetary legacies, which are of major concerns in times of population growth whilst living on a finite planet. Who should be responsible for planetary impact of war is considered, with some focus on government and other organisations. Collaborative strategies for caring for the planet through guidelines and level of departments of defence and national law-making organisations at national levels are discussed, as well as overviewing the focus and role of the United Nations and the associated Sustainability Goals. The paper concludes by suggesting that a more powerful way to influence us in our responsibilities to live peacefully, rather than a virtuous ‘should not’ approach, is the need to shift back to a moral positioning in our perspectives as humans being part of the ecosystem, so that we view ourselves as being at one with all life. In this perspective, if we incur harm to this planet, we are harming ourselves. Suggestions for living in a more peaceful way are drawn from indigenous wisdom and spiritual teachers, particularly the current Pope Francis.

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Educating for Ethical Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-253-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Lawton Robert Burns, Jeff C. Goldsmith and Aditi Sen

Researchers recommend a reorganization of the medical profession into larger groups with a multispecialty mix. We analyze whether there is evidence for the superiority of…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers recommend a reorganization of the medical profession into larger groups with a multispecialty mix. We analyze whether there is evidence for the superiority of these models and if this organizational transformation is underway.

Design/Methodology Approach

We summarize the evidence on scale and scope economies in physician group practice, and then review the trends in physician group size and specialty mix to conduct survivorship tests of the most efficient models.

Findings

The distribution of physician groups exhibits two interesting tails. In the lower tail, a large percentage of physicians continue to practice in small, physician-owned practices. In the upper tail, there is a small but rapidly growing percentage of large groups that have been organized primarily by non-physician owners.

Research Limitations

While our analysis includes no original data, it does collate all known surveys of physician practice characteristics and group practice formation to provide a consistent picture of physician organization.

Research Implications

Our review suggests that scale and scope economies in physician practice are limited. This may explain why most physicians have retained their small practices.

Practical Implications

Larger, multispecialty groups have been primarily organized by non-physician owners in vertically integrated arrangements. There is little evidence supporting the efficiencies of such models and some concern they may pose anticompetitive threats.

Originality/Value

This is the first comprehensive review of the scale and scope economies of physician practice in nearly two decades. The research results do not appear to have changed much; nor has much changed in physician practice organization.

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Annual Review of Health Care Management: Revisiting The Evolution of Health Systems Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-715-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ami R. Moore and Foster K. Amey

This article analyses the earnings attainment of male African immigrants in the United States. Using OLS regression and data from the 1990 Census of Population and…

Abstract

This article analyses the earnings attainment of male African immigrants in the United States. Using OLS regression and data from the 1990 Census of Population and Housing, we identified the determinants of annual earnings attainment of male African immigrants and examined them by country of origin. We also assessed the impact of skill transferability via ability to speak English on such earnings. Results showed that the process of earnings attainment of African immigrants vary by country of origin. For example, while educational attainment is a significant predictor of annual earnings for only Kenyan and South African immigrants, duration of stay in the United States is significant for immigrants from Cape Verde. Overall, the pay‐offs of college education are higher for South African immigrants than it is for the other groups. Non‐Anglophone immigrants begin with a disadvantage relative to their English‐speaking counterparts. However, this disadvantage is eroded by the length of stay in the US, ability to speak English, and other job‐related characteristics.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Steven R. Ferraro and Darrol J. Stanley

Briefly reviews previous research on the value of investment advisors’ recommendations and presents a study comparing portfolio returns from analysts’ recommendations in…

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous research on the value of investment advisors’ recommendations and presents a study comparing portfolio returns from analysts’ recommendations in the Wall Street Journal’s “Dartboard” contest 1990‐1996, four randomly selected shares and the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Finds the analysts’ portfolio has the highest average returns and standard deviation; and that although some individual analysts have excellent scores in the contest, this is inversely related to the number of times they participate. Suggests that they do not significantly outperform other portfolios, but that contest winners’ tips have significant effects on the market, especially for non‐listed shares. Assesses the implications of the results for the efficient market hypothesis and the share prices of firms with higher asymmetric information.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1969

THERE has recently sprung up a great interest in antiques, probably due to Arthur Negus and his TV and broadcast programmes, and perhaps it is this which has made county…

Abstract

THERE has recently sprung up a great interest in antiques, probably due to Arthur Negus and his TV and broadcast programmes, and perhaps it is this which has made county librarians also, think about their past and their beginnings. Gloucestershire was the first to become aware of the fact that its library was fifty years old, and that a genuine antique, in the shape of its first librarian, still existed and could be questioned about the early days. So in December, 1967, the Gloucestershire Library Committee staged a most successful 50th birthday party, and invited me to cut the birthday cake, on which were 50 candles! And a very great occasion it was.

Details

New Library World, vol. 70 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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