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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Penghe Chen, Shubhabrata Sen, Hung Keng Pung, Wenwei Xue and Wai Choong Wong

The rapid proliferation of mobile context aware applications has resulted in an increased research interest towards developing specialized context data management…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid proliferation of mobile context aware applications has resulted in an increased research interest towards developing specialized context data management strategies for mobile entities. The purpose of this paper is to aim to develop a new way to model mobile entities and manage their contexts accordingly.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes the concept of “Mobile Space” to model mobile entities and presents strategies to manage the various contexts associated therein. To handle availability related issues, two system services are designed: the “Availability Updating Service” which is an identifier based mechanism and is designed to keep track of mobile objects and handle availability related issues, and the “Application Callback Service” which is a publish/subscribe based mechanism to handle application disruptions and interruptions arising due to mobility.

Findings

The paper presents a detailed study of the proposed framework and a description of the underlying services and the components therein to validate the framework. Experimental results carried out in WiFi and 3G environments indicate that the proposed techniques can support mobile applications and minimize application disruptions with minimal overhead.

Originality/value

The proposed context management framework is generic in nature and is not designed for a specific class of applications. Any mobile context aware application can leverage on the framework and utilize the provided functionalities to manage application disruptions. Also, the decoupling of mobile application layer and the underlying context data management layer renders context data management layer transparent to the application design.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

R. Hari Krishnan and S. Pugazhenthi

Wheelchair users face great difficulty in transferring themselves from one surface to another, for example from wheelchair to a toilet commode. In such cases, mostly a…

Abstract

Purpose

Wheelchair users face great difficulty in transferring themselves from one surface to another, for example from wheelchair to a toilet commode. In such cases, mostly a caregiver’s assistance may be required, but it affects one’s dignity. The purpose of this paper is to develop a robotic self-transfer device, which is aimed at offering privacy and independence to people with lower limb disabilities in performing daily activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The device, attached to a powered wheelchair, is useful in transferring a user from a wheelchair to a toilet commode or any other surface following simple and natural transfer procedure without the need of any caregiver. The user can achieve transfer by operating joysticks. The device employs two linear actuators and a motor to accomplish the transfer. Trials were carried out to test the performance of the device by involving potential beneficiaries.

Findings

The device could successfully transfer the participants from a wheelchair to a chair with less effort in less than a minute. The results of the trials show that the participants felt comfortable in using the device. It was also found that the device is superior to other existing transfer systems in terms of comfort and operation.

Originality/value

The existing self-transfer systems are alternative solutions that serve the purpose of mobility coupled with self-transfer. Instead of developing an alternative mobility solution, this paper proposes a novel design of a self-transfer device that can be used as an attachment to wheelchair.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Noel Carroll and Ita Richardson

Connected Health is an emerging and rapidly developing field never before witnessed across the healthcare sector. It has the potential to transform healthcare service…

Abstract

Purpose

Connected Health is an emerging and rapidly developing field never before witnessed across the healthcare sector. It has the potential to transform healthcare service systems by increasing its safety, quality and overall efficiency. However, as healthcare technologies or medical devices continuously rely more on software development, one of the core challenges is examining how Connected Health is regulated – often impacting Connected Health innovation. The purpose of this paper is to present an understanding of how Connected Health is regulated. Many of these regulatory developments fall under “medical devices”, giving rise to Software-as-a-Medical Device (SaaMD).

Design/methodology/approach

Through an extensive literature review, this paper demystifies Connected Health regulation. It presents the outcome of expert discussions which explore the key regulatory developments in the context of Connected Health to provide a practical guide to understanding how regulation can potentially shape healthcare innovation.

Findings

Several key issues are identified, and the authors present a comprehensive overview of regulatory developments relating to Connected Health with a view to support the continued growth of IT-enabled healthcare service models. The authors also identify the key challenges in Connected Health and identify areas for future research.

Originality/value

A key outcome of this research is a clearer understanding of the opportunities and challenges that regulation and standards present to Connected Health. Furthermore, this research is of critical importance in a first attempt towards recognising the impact of regulation and standards compliance in Connected Health.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Dave Miles and Kevin Doughty

This paper aims to demonstrate the need for telecare service providers to broaden their horizons in order to offer an extended range of service options when considering…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the need for telecare service providers to broaden their horizons in order to offer an extended range of service options when considering the holistic needs of vulnerable people who wish to remain independent in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the processes involved in establishing a telecare service to include the provision of all forms of assistive technologies including aids and adaptations and elements of standalone telecare, which are particularly relevant to families of people with learning disabilities. The work includes a review of a survey of local authorities which demonstrates a clear expansion of AT provision.

Findings

The Nottingham model of assisted living provider services is proposed as an example of how home improvements, community equipment and telecare/health services may be integrated.

Originality/value

The implications of these changes are discussed in the context of additional resources needed for improved prescribing, installation and support.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2009

Kevin Doughty and Chris Steele

Telecare services have evolved from community alarm systems into sophisticated methods of supporting the health and well‐being of many vulnerable groups. Their potential…

Abstract

Telecare services have evolved from community alarm systems into sophisticated methods of supporting the health and well‐being of many vulnerable groups. Their potential for extending this role may be supported by the integration of services involving all telecare alarm services, primary care services and community equipment stores. The key to integration may be the expanded role of the 24‐hour monitoring centres to provide case review facilities that allow prevention services to be offered following an emergency, as well as the issuing of standalone telecare devices. The potential for successful integration may be governed by the level of training provided for call handling staff, and by the creation of specialist centres using virtualisation technologies.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2011

Kevin Doughty

This paper seeks to describe how the special built‐in features of modern smart phones can be used to open up the potential of these devices for use as assistive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe how the special built‐in features of modern smart phones can be used to open up the potential of these devices for use as assistive technologies in supporting the independence and quality of life of vulnerable people.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes, through a number of relevant examples, how low‐cost, downloadable applications enable the camera, the microphone, the accelerometer, the GPS receiver and the touch‐screen, to be used for specific assistive purposes.

Findings

Smart phones and their applications are capable of providing useful support to a range of vulnerable groups including people with sensory disabilities, diabetics and people suffering from mental health problems, epilepsy or communication issues. It is likely that mobile care services using smart phones will be offered in tandem with home telecare services to extend the independence of the service user from the home to the outside environment.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how smart phone applications are capable of transforming a high‐performance mobile phone into a number of different assistive devices that can improve the lives of millions of people with and without disability.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Kath Cooper and Kevin Doughty

A pilot project was initiated in Wrexham in North Wales with two groups of patients suffering from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). One group was provided…

Abstract

A pilot project was initiated in Wrexham in North Wales with two groups of patients suffering from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). One group was provided with a commercial telehealth system (HomMed Genesis) while the other received a medical telecare service involving standalone vital signs peripherals and a phone call from a respiratory nurse who collected data and entered them into a spreadsheet. After four months of monitoring, the outcomes were analysed for both groups and were found to be largely similar both in terms of the interventions, and the perceived quality of life benefits for the patients. A cost benefit analysis showed that the savings to the NHS exceeded the project costs by about £9,000 thanks mainly to a reduction in the number of exacerbations exhibited by the patients. It is recommended that this form of telecare may greatly increase the independence of people with a chronic disease or long‐term condition and that further studies need to be initiated to determine which measurement regime is most suitable.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Williams Ezinwa Nwagwu and Henry Abolade Areo

The purpose of this study was to examine how cost, network and technology factors affect the use of mobile technologies for clients’ care in internal medicine department…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine how cost, network and technology factors affect the use of mobile technologies for clients’ care in internal medicine department in Nigeria’s premier teaching hospital, the University College Hospital, Ibadan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a survey design covering a cross-section of medical doctors, pharmacists, nurses and medical laboratory technologists in the Department of Internal Medicine. A questionnaire guided data collection.

Findings

There is a high level of consciousness and use of mobile technologies for meeting healthcare needs of internal medicine clients in the University College Hospital, Ibadan and medical practitioners are deploying the technology most. However, there is no similar evidence of consciousness and use of wearable health-care technologies and solutions. The hospital makes some provision for mobile technology support for relevant medical staff and purposes. However, about three in 10 of the respondents reported that they use their own funds to recharge hospital-provided mobile phones means.

Research limitations/implications

The study focusses only on one institution but the result reflects the situation in other hospitals, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria being the major supplier of health and medical human resources in the country.

Practical implications

The hospital requires undertaking institutional assessment of mobile service need and consumption for clients’ care and thereafter make adequate provision to match the need. Furthermore, the institution could work out various forms of collaboration with mobile technology operators in the country to subsidise the cost of the use of telephones for clients’ care as part of their corporate social responsibility.

Social implications

The institution could work out collaboration with mobile technology operators in the country to subsidise cost of mobile client care as part of the philanthropic and corporate social responsibility of telecom companies.

Originality/value

This study focusses mainly on internal medicine and has implication for a more proper understanding of adult deployment of mobile phones for client care.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Kevin Doughty and Gareth Williams

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an end-to-end process to improve the prescription, uptake and utilisation of assisted living technologies in order to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an end-to-end process to improve the prescription, uptake and utilisation of assisted living technologies in order to improve outcomes for older and disabled people.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involved consideration of the ways in which people’s support needs are considered and how a more relevant picture can be drawn using their own goals and the issues and obstacles that prevent them achieving improvement. New models of support were introduced in order to improve the suitability of prescriptions for people who lived under different circumstances, sometimes with family carers.

Findings

It was found that the application of an enhanced assessment approach required professionals and family members to understand more about the range of available technologies and their limitations. In order to avoid rejection of the technology, there will be a need for service providers to extend the range of applications that they offer, and to consider the suitability of the home environment for introducing new systems.

Practical implications

The new model of assessment and prescription will improve the options for independent living for many people with minor disabilities and age-related problems.

Social implications

The correct use of assistive technologies will be improved leading to users having more confidence in the use of technologies to support independence in place of conventional and expensive care services.

Originality/value

The new model of assessment and prescription described in this paper is novel and developed by the authors as original work. Its value is that it disrupts current assessment schemes and will encourage innovation in prescription, and a more person-centred approach to satisfying the needs of vulnerable people.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

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