Search results

1 – 10 of 893
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Stan Pace

Suggests that in transforming their companies CEOs and management teams often do not act extensively enough to reposition their businesses. States that companies should be…

Abstract

Suggests that in transforming their companies CEOs and management teams often do not act extensively enough to reposition their businesses. States that companies should be prepared to implement programs that are fast, focused and simultaneous in order to create a better and long‐lasting shareholder value. Concludes that successful turnarounds require management to act rapidly, comprehensively and dramatically, which in turn will achieve speedier rewards.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Orit Gadiesh, Stan Pace and Paul Rogers

951

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

THE Government are planning to spend another odd million or two in running a “waste not, want not” campaign to ram down our throats. Just another example of officials…

Abstract

THE Government are planning to spend another odd million or two in running a “waste not, want not” campaign to ram down our throats. Just another example of officials being profilgate with taxpayers money, you may think.

Details

Work Study, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1954

A Study in Organisation. Under the non‐committal title “Construction of Esso Refinery, Fawley; A Study in Organisation”, A. P. Gray and Mark Abrams tell the story of how…

47

Abstract

A Study in Organisation. Under the non‐committal title “Construction of Esso Refinery, Fawley; A Study in Organisation”, A. P. Gray and Mark Abrams tell the story of how this vast £37½ million venture was constructed in little more than two years—thanks to outstandingly efficient management both at the planning and construction stages.

Details

Work Study, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

181

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Robert M. Randall

64

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

370

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

239

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Catherine Gorrell

184

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Georgios I. Zekos

Globalisation is generally defined as the “denationalisation of clusters of political, economic, and social activities” that destabilize the ability of the sovereign State…

1107

Abstract

Globalisation is generally defined as the “denationalisation of clusters of political, economic, and social activities” that destabilize the ability of the sovereign State to control activities on its territory, due to the rising need to find solutions for universal problems, like the pollution of the environment, on an international level. Globalisation is a complex, forceful legal and social process that take place within an integrated whole with out regard to geographical boundaries. Globalisation thus differs from international activities, which arise between and among States, and it differs from multinational activities that occur in more than one nation‐State. This does not mean that countries are not involved in the sociolegal dynamics that those transboundary process trigger. In a sense, the movements triggered by global processes promote greater economic interdependence among countries. Globalisation can be traced back to the depression preceding World War II and globalisation at that time included spreading of the capitalist economic system as a means of getting access to extended markets. The first step was to create sufficient export surplus to maintain full employment in the capitalist world and secondly establishing a globalized economy where the planet would be united in peace and wealth. The idea of interdependence among quite separate and distinct countries is a very important part of talks on globalisation and a significant side of today’s global political economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

1 – 10 of 893