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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Ranjana Saxena and Stan Frost

Sewage, particularly the domestic variety, is the major polluter ofthe aquatic ecosystem in developing Asian countries. Besideseutrophication, it causes a number of…

Abstract

Sewage, particularly the domestic variety, is the major polluter of the aquatic ecosystem in developing Asian countries. Besides eutrophication, it causes a number of waterborne diseases. The growing urbanization in relation to deteriorating water quality; existing practices of sewage management through treatment; reuse and recycling; as well as the legal support to curb pollution are discussed in regard to China, India, Korean Republic and Jordan. Some meaningful suggestions are made for improved sewage management and pollution control.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Khodabakshsh Karami and Stan Frost

Noise measurement and social questionnaire surveys in three residential areas around Mehrabad International Airport (Tehran, Iran) were based upon randomly selected…

Abstract

Noise measurement and social questionnaire surveys in three residential areas around Mehrabad International Airport (Tehran, Iran) were based upon randomly selected dwellings in each area. A total of 193 individuals responded and many are annoyed and dissatisfied with aircraft noise and in consequence they would like to move. Aircraft noise is the strongest negative environmental factor affecting the residents in the vicinity of Mehrabad Airport and it could be a hazard for their health.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Judith K. Ohles

Bestsellers, the weekly Top 40, Fortune 500, Places Rated Almanac are just a few of the ranked lists available that fascinate and thrill almost every‐one. These lists…

Abstract

Bestsellers, the weekly Top 40, Fortune 500, Places Rated Almanac are just a few of the ranked lists available that fascinate and thrill almost every‐one. These lists often contribute to our decision making. A consumer looks for the best car, a college graduate hunts for jobs at the top companies, a student applies to the best law schools. Library patrons often ask for ratings of different items, but rankings, though a valuable source of information on various topics, can be very difficult to locate. This bibliography provides a list of selected sources of rankings covering the following areas: multi‐subject, consumer, education, film and television, geography, and music.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Robert R. Tucker

Explains the auditing problems encountered by multinational companies under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Regulation of Technology Transfers and the…

Abstract

Explains the auditing problems encountered by multinational companies under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Regulation of Technology Transfers and the complications of resource allocation in countries with different cultures to the USA. Highlights currency fluctuations, human resources and environmental audit. Lists some of the differences between US and foreign auditor independence and auditing standards. Lays down the requirements for an auditor on foreign assignment.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal…

Abstract

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal winter is relatively mild, mainly a Westerly pattern, occasionally wild and windy, wet with a rare cold “snap”. There are variations in the pattern, damp and warm in the south‐west, few frosts and rarely any snow; in the north of the country, Scotland, much colder, with the south‐east partaking of the weather pattern of the land mass of the Continent. The variations appear more of the mild weather in the South and colder, appreciably, in the North; recalling service personnel stationed at Gosport who did not need an overcoat all winter, whereas in the North, many found it necessary to wear a light overcoat tor most of the year, the south‐east corner of England, obtaining no help from the warming Gulf Stream, often gets the worst of the weather, which it has done to a very considerable extent in this winter.

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British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Maintaining an adequate nutritional state, important at all times, is never more so than during the dark days of Winter. The body reserves are then taxed in varying…

Abstract

Maintaining an adequate nutritional state, important at all times, is never more so than during the dark days of Winter. The body reserves are then taxed in varying degrees of severity by sudden downward plunges of the thermometer, days when there is no sight of the sun, lashing rains and cold winds, ice, frost, snow, gales and blizzards. The body processes must be maintained against these onslaughts of nature — body temperatures, resistance against infections, a state of well‐being with all systems operating and an ability to “take it”. A sufficient and well balanced diet is vital to all this, most would say, the primarily significant factor. The National Food Surveys do not demonstrate any insufficiency in the national diet in terms of energy values, intake of vitamins, minerals and nutrients, but statistics can be fallacious amd misleading. NFS statistics are no indication of quality of food, its sufficiency for physiological purposes and to meet the economic stresses of the times. The intake of staple foods — bread, milk, butter, meat, &c., — have been slowly declining for years, as their prices rise higher and higher. If the Government had foreseen the massive unemployment problem, it is doubtful if they would have crippled the highly commendable School Meals Service. To have continued this — school milk, school dinners — even with the financial help it would have required would be seen as a “Supplementary Benefit” much better than the uncontrolled cash flow of social security. Child nutrition must be suffering. Stand outside a school at lunch‐time and watch the stream of children trailing along to the “Chippie” for a handfull of chip potatoes; even making a “meal” on an ice lollie.

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British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Marta B. Calás and Linda Smircich

Since the late 1980s we’ve been inspired by feminist theorizing to interrogate our field of organization studies, looking critically at the questions it asks, at the…

Abstract

Since the late 1980s we’ve been inspired by feminist theorizing to interrogate our field of organization studies, looking critically at the questions it asks, at the underlying premises of the theories allowing for such questions, and by articulating alternative premises as a way of suggesting other theories and thus other questions the field may need to ask. In so doing, our collaborative work has applied insights from feminist theorizing and cultural studies to topics such as leadership, entrepreneurship, globalization, business ethics, issues of work and family, and more recently to sustainability. This text is a retrospective on our attempts at intervening in our field, where we sought to make it more fundamentally responsive to problems in the world we live in and, from this reflective position, considering how and why our field’s conventional theories and practices – despite good intentions – may be unable to do so.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Kingsley O. Olibe and William M. Cready

This paper reports the results of the effects of the release, in the United Kingdom, annual reports and accounts (ARA), on security prices and trading volume of the U.K…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of the effects of the release, in the United Kingdom, annual reports and accounts (ARA), on security prices and trading volume of the U.K. firms. If the information reported in the annual reports and accounts (ARA) is relevant, the U.S. security market will respond to the release news through return and volume variances. Both signals are indicators of the relevance of the annual reports and accounts. The results of the analysis suggest the existence of unexpected returns to the annual reports and accounts and no corresponding U.S. trading volume response. The price results are in marked contrast to the findings of previous research that examined the information content of U.S. domestic annual reports, but do not detect a stock price response (e.g., Foster et al. 1986; Bernard and Stober 1989; Cready and Mynatt 1991). Our stock price analyses indicate that non‐U.S. GAAP accounting measures do not impede U.S investors' ability to use U.K. firms' ARA in valuing the sample firms. Indeed, U.S. investors use information from the ARA in their valuation of U.K. firms. Since trading responses to a disclosure are generally more easily detected than price responses (Cready and Hurtt 1999), these findings jointly suggest the provincial nature of the ARA release.

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Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Alison Rankin Frost

Culture is still an issue for organisations both internally and externally, and becoming increasingly complex as markets, customers and employees go ‘global’. Culture is a…

Abstract

Culture is still an issue for organisations both internally and externally, and becoming increasingly complex as markets, customers and employees go ‘global’. Culture is a multidimensional concept: organisations need to negotiate their own corporate culture; the national cultures of the nation‐states in which they operate; ethnic differences at regional and pan‐national levels; differences in the industry cultures of the market sectors in which they operate; and the various functional or professional cultures of the people that work within the organisation. While each of these dimensions poses its own issues, it is the interaction between them that is of key concern. When one dimension clashes with another the results can have a negative effect on the organisation; this clash is called a ‘culture impact’. Like earthquakes along fault lines, cultures are static until an event occurs which rocks the steady state. These events cannot be prevented, but they can be predicted and prepared for. And good preparation can mean the difference between survival and destruction. So it follows that negotiating culture requires the organisation to identify its position within the dimensions of culture, to understand the expectations and perception of these culture groups, to foresee when and how these groups will clash, and to plan strategies for dealing with the impact.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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