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Article

Connie Freid and Stan Freid

These specialists in marketing and customer intelligence challenge Don Peppers' and Martha Rogers' reliance on past customer behavior, as suggested in their recent article…

Abstract

These specialists in marketing and customer intelligence challenge Don Peppers' and Martha Rogers' reliance on past customer behavior, as suggested in their recent article “A Marketing Paradigm: Share of Customer, Not Market Share” in the March/April 1995 issue of Planning Review.

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Planning Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Memories and musings of the long ago reveal revolutionary changes in the world's food trade and in particular, food sources and marketing in the United Kingdom. Earliest…

Abstract

Memories and musings of the long ago reveal revolutionary changes in the world's food trade and in particular, food sources and marketing in the United Kingdom. Earliest memories of the retail food trade are of many small shops; it used to be said that, given a good site, food would always sell well. There were multiples, but none of their stores differed from the pattern and some of the firms — Upton's, the International, were household names as they are now. Others, eg., the Maypole, and names that are lost to memory, have been absorbed in the many mergers of more recent times. Food production has changed even more dramatically; countries once major sources and massive exporters, have now become equally massive importers and completely new sources of food have developed. It all reflects the political changes, resulting from two World Wars, just as the British market reflects the shifts in world production.

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British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Wanda J. Orlikowski and Jack J. Baroudi

Much of the prior research into information systems (IS) workers has assumed that they are professionals. In this paper we examine the characteristics of IS workers, IS…

Abstract

Much of the prior research into information systems (IS) workers has assumed that they are professionals. In this paper we examine the characteristics of IS workers, IS work and the IS workplace, and suggest that this perspective is mistaken. Drawing on the sociological theory of professions as a reference discipline we contend that IS professionalism is an inappropriate categorization, and that such a portrayal limits our understanding of IS workers and their work. We argue in this paper that a more faithful and potentially useful characterization is to view IS workers as members of an occupational group. Within this perspective, an understanding of the occupational culture, context and history of IS workers is essential to an understanding of the IS occupation. We examine and challenge some common myths regarding IS work, technology and the IS workplace. We conclude by making some recommendations for future research, which should enhance our understanding of IS workers as members of an occupation.

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Office Technology and People, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0167-5710

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