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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Subhan Shahid, Annika Becker and Yasir Mansoor Kundi

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via stakeholder trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a moderated mediation model using an experimental design with N = 248 business and public management students of France.

Findings

The results indicate that both a formal reputational signal (third-party certificate) and an informal reputational signal (self-proclaiming to be social entrepreneurial) affect stakeholder trust and intentions to donate. Stakeholder trust partially mediated the relationship between the formal signal and intentions to donate, and the mediation effect was stronger when an informal signal was present (vs. not present).

Practical implications

Trust is central to the exchange of nonprofit organizations and their external stakeholders. To enhance trust and supportive behavior toward nonprofit organizations, these organizations may consider using formal and informal reputational signaling within their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This research highlights the pivotal role of formal and informal reputational signals for the enhancing stakeholders' trust and donation behavior in a nonprofit context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2019

S. J. Oswald A. J. Mascarenhas

Building trust and living interpersonal trust are crucial corporate executive virtues that are needed today. Once you have developed and solidified a high level of genuine…

Abstract

Executive Summary

Building trust and living interpersonal trust are crucial corporate executive virtues that are needed today. Once you have developed and solidified a high level of genuine interpersonal trust with all your stakeholders, especially customers, suppliers, and employees, then you are on the right path of managing and transforming your company. A high level of interpersonal trust between all stakeholders and corporates in a business situation will break down communication barriers, foster serious conversation and sharing of ideas, and will eliminate corporate transactional anxieties of fear, mistrust, guilt, rigidity, blame, and resentment. When stakeholders trust you and you trust them, then you speak freely, they speak freely, and your mutual sustained transparency is a gateway to survival, revival, and sustained corporate recovery and transformation, and steady growth and prosperity. Conversely, when there is low trust, high mistrust, and high distrust among stakeholders in a business situation, communications and conversations are stressed and fragmented, teamwork and team spirit are very low, and the company is heading toward its ruin and extermination. Such is the crucial role of interpersonal trust in business. This chapter explores the crucial phenomenon of corporate interpersonal trust. We review various cases, models, concepts, definitions, and theories of trust from the management literature in general, and from the marketing field in particular, to derive psychological, behavioral, ethical, and moral principles of corporate trust, trusting relations, and trusting strategies.

Details

Corporate Ethics for Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-192-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Mohammed Aboramadan, Khalid Abed Dahleez, Caterina Farao and Mohammed Alshurafa

This study proposes a model of the effect of financial and non-financial performance measures on nonprofit organizations’ (NPOs’) effectiveness where internal stakeholders

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a model of the effect of financial and non-financial performance measures on nonprofit organizations’ (NPOs’) effectiveness where internal stakeholders' trust play an intervening role in the aforementioned relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 218 employees working at the largest Palestinian NPOs. The perceptions of these employees were used to measure the variables, and structural equation modeling was used to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that the use of financial and non-financial performance measures was positively related to NPOs' effectiveness. Internal stakeholders' trust showed a significant mediating effect between the use of performance measures and NPOs' effectiveness.

Practical implications

This study may be of value for NPOs' managers due to the positive effects performance measurement (PM) can have on NPO effectiveness. Managers and boards should seek to enhance their internal stakeholders' trust to achieve higher levels of effectiveness.

Originality/value

This study has three main contributions. First, it is one of the very few papers which empirically examines the links between PM and NPOs' effectiveness, rather than providing conceptual lens. Second, the paper investigates the role of stakeholders' trust as a mediating mechanism in the proposed model, a topic that has been neglected by NPOs governance researchers. Finally, the study uses data from the Palestinian context, contributing to the PM literature by providing evidence on the relationship between performance measures and NPOs' effectiveness from a non-Western context.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Isaac Wanzige Magoola, Rogers Mwesigwa and Ruth Nabwami

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence of the relationship between the community and public-private partnership (PPP) projects by focusing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence of the relationship between the community and public-private partnership (PPP) projects by focusing on community engagement, trust and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross sectional and correlational and it uses project level data that were collected by means of a questionnaire from a sample of 47 PPP projects in Uganda.

Findings

Results indicate that trust and community engagement are significantly associated with the performance of PPP projects.

Research limitations/implications

This study was cross-sectional, and thus monitoring changes in behaviour over time was not possible. The study used a quantitative research approach and this limits respondents from expressing their feelings fully. The study was conducted in Uganda and it is possible that the results of this study can be generalized to developing countries with environments similar to that of Uganda.

Practical implications

The results are important for PPP projects to understand the role that trust and community engagement play in as far as the performance of PPP projects is concerned.

Originality/value

Whilst there have been a number of studies on the performance of PPP projects, this study provides initial empirical evidence on the influence of trust and community engagement on the performance of PPP projects using evidence from PPP projects of an African developing economy – Uganda.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Charles Baah, Innocent Senyo Kwasi Acquah and Daniel Ofori

The need to stay competitive amidst ever-changing business environment has shifted competitive strategies from firms to supply chains. Managers are now basing competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

The need to stay competitive amidst ever-changing business environment has shifted competitive strategies from firms to supply chains. Managers are now basing competitive strategies on supply chains acknowledging that supply chains present competitive advantages among other resources. The purpose of the study is to explore the predictive relevance of supply chain collaboration and the extent to which it influences supply chain visibility, stakeholder trust, environmental and financial performances. This study focused on manufacturing firms due to their supplier relationships, consumption of resources, energy and emissions of greenhouse gasses.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a survey research design, a quantitative approach and partial least square structural equation modelling technique in making data analysis and interpretations due to its suitability for predictive research models as is the case in this study.

Findings

The study hypothesized that supply chain collaboration positively and significantly interacts with supply chain visibility, stakeholder trust, environmental and financial performances. The study results confirmed supply chain collaboration as a significant, positive and a robust influence on supply chain visibility, stakeholder trust, environmental and financial performances thereby projecting win-win scenarios for firms that engage in collaborative supply chain practices.

Originality/value

The study is among the few to indicate findings in relation to the scope of supply chain collaboration's potency in influencing performance from the perspective of manufacturing firms operational in an emerging economy. Thus, this study contributes to understanding the wider scope of supply chain collaboration, its interactions with other firm variables and how it informs decisions of managers, scholars and supply chain partners.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Fatima Zahra Barrane, Nelson Oly Ndubisi, Sachin Kamble, Gahima Egide Karuranga and Diane Poulin

The study aims to explore the critical approaches adopted by innovative organizations and to build an environment of trust between the multiple stakeholders collaborating…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the critical approaches adopted by innovative organizations and to build an environment of trust between the multiple stakeholders collaborating for new product development (NPD).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach is adopted in this study. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with experts from the wood product industry in Quebec, Canada. These organizations have successfully adopted the latest technological developments and have developed a strong collaboration with their stakeholders.

Findings

The study identified eleven strategies for the innovative organizations that included early involvement of the stakeholders in the design process, developing long-term relationships and fostering a transparent environment using Industry 4.0 technologies. A novel framework for using this strategy is presented with three stages of application, namely, planning, enactment and review.

Practical implications

Inter-organizational collaborations in NPD are more successful when imbued with trust. The NPD strategies must allow innovative organizations to achieve a balanced ecosystem in which value created through the adaption of new technology can be thoroughly captured through commercialization on time with no field failure.

Originality/value

The study adds to the body of knowledge in stakeholder theory and NPD research and practice.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Robert Hurley, Xue Gong and Adeela Waqar

The purpose of this paper is to explore a stakeholder trust model of organizations and applies the model to diagnose the loss of trust in large banks (Universal and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a stakeholder trust model of organizations and applies the model to diagnose the loss of trust in large banks (Universal and Investment Banks) after the global financial crisis (GFC). Prescriptions for the repair of trust are offered along with the diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical underpinnings of the stakeholder trust model of organizations are supported using the literature in marketing and management. Case study data on large and community banks are used to explore differences in these type of banks as they relate to trustworthiness as articulated in the stakeholder trust model of organizations.

Findings

The stakeholder trust model of organizations and six dimensions of trustworthiness help to explain why trust eroded in large banks during the GFC but increased or remained stable among some community banks. This diagnosis of the loss of trust also points to interventions that will be necessary to restore trust going forward among large banks.

Research limitations/implications

Scholars in marketing need to develop a more macro view of the firm that examines trust beyond customers to reflect a wider stakeholder focus and issues of corporate social responsibility, trust reputation and license to operate.

Practical implications

This paper points out strategic changes, some of which are radical, that will be required to restore and sustain stakeholder trust in large banks.

Social implications

Building trustworthy banks is essential to social and economic progress.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a void in marketing research by moving beyond the product and transactional level focus and framing a more macro oriented approach to understand trust in banks.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Sherif El-Halaby, Khaled Hussainey and Heba Abou-El-Sood

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of sharia, social and financial disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty towards Islamic banks (IBs). The paper also aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of sharia, social and financial disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty towards Islamic banks (IBs). The paper also aims to examine the extent to which trust and satisfaction mediate this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

It uses data collected from 600 respondents to survey questionnaires disseminated to stakeholders from 15 countries dealing with IBs. Structural equation modelling is adopted with a partial least square approach.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a significant impact of disclosure on stakeholderstrust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The results also indicate that there is a partial mediating effect of trust and satisfaction in the relationship between disclosure and loyalty. This paper is one of the first studies examining the effect of disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty. The authors provide novel findings, which have theoretical and practical implications for disclosure in IBs and their relationship with stakeholders.

Originality/value

The analysis offers a novel contribution to the Islamic banking literature by offering the first evidence on the impact of disclosure on stakeholderstrust, satisfaction, and loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Bettina Büchel, Levi Nieminen, Heidi Armbruster‐Domeyer and Daniel Denison

Team‐based innovation requires a balance of creative and pragmatic processes both within teams and between teams and their organizational stakeholders. However, prior…

Abstract

Purpose

Team‐based innovation requires a balance of creative and pragmatic processes both within teams and between teams and their organizational stakeholders. However, prior research has focused primarily on the internal team dynamics that facilitate innovation, paying comparatively little attention to team‐stakeholder dynamics. The purpose of this study is to address this limitation by studying the impact of team‐stakeholder networks and shared cognition on the effectiveness of innovation teams.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the knowledge and trust linkages between 51 new product development (NPD) teams and their organizational stakeholders using a mixed methods design that combines network analysis, surveys, and qualitative interviews. Multiple indicators of team effectiveness were collected at various stages of the innovation process.

Findings

The results show that effective NPD teams establish knowledge ties with many non‐redundant organizational stakeholders and foster a high level of agreement among stakeholders about team innovation factors. Conversely, effective NPD teams also establish highly centralized trust networks that are focused on only a few key stakeholders in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on NPD teams in chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Future studies should seek to replicate the findings using larger samples of teams involving diverse innovation tasks.

Practical implications

These results have implications for the most effective way to build and manage innovation teams, considering both pre‐existing stakeholder linkages and networking strategies for the future.

Originality/value

The results suggest that the optimal characteristics of team‐stakeholder knowledge and trust networks differ and highlight the unique importance of shared understanding about risk‐taking and creativity beyond higher overall levels.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Fariba Darabi, Mark N.K. Saunders and Murray Clark

The purpose of this study is to explore trust initiation and development in collaborations between universities and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore trust initiation and development in collaborations between universities and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the implications for enabling engaged scholarship (ES).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a qualitative inductive approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive maximum variation sample comprising 14 SMEs and 12 university stakeholders.

Findings

The authors highlight the role of calculus-based trust in the initiation of collaborations emphasising the key roles of networking and referrals. As collaborations develop, reciprocal insights regarding stakeholders’ competencies and integrity and the development of knowledge-based trust can support engagement, in particular, knowledge application. Although relationships have a common sense of purpose, a fully engaged campus remains absent.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a collaborative research between eight SMEs and one university business school and does not reflect ES fully as conceptualised. It provides few insights into the role of trust (or distrust) in such collaborations where things go wrong.

Practical implications

Universities looking to enable ES collaborations with SMEs need to develop and enact strategies which support ongoing engagement and enable identification-based trust (IBT). Recommendations for universities and human resource development regarding interventions to support trust initiation and development to enable knowledge application ES are outlined and suggestions are offered for future research.

Social implications

University strategies to support the development of trust and, in particular, IBT are likely to benefit longer-term relationships and the development of ES between SMEs and universities.

Originality/value

Little research has been undertaken on trust initiation and development between academic and SME stakeholders or the associated implications for ES.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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