Search results

1 – 10 of over 148000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Paul Blaise Issock Issock, Mercy Mpinganjira and Mornay Roberts-Lombard

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a response to the ongoing debate about the (in)compatibility of the traditional marketing mix (the 4Ps) in the field of social marketing. In doing so, this study examines the important role that the stages of behaviour change play in influencing the effectiveness of traditional marketing mix elements in the context of recycling in South African households.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a quantitative method, relying on a survey of 699 heads of households in South Africa. Multigroup analysis and structural equation modelling were applied to test the impact of stages of changes on the potential effect of marketing mix elements on the intention to recycle household waste.

Findings

The results established that although the traditional marketing mix elements have a marginal effect on the intention to recycle household waste, further analyses revealed that this impact of the marketing mix is contingent on the stage of change in which the target audience is found. Thus, the findings indicated that the marketing mix elements significantly influence the intention to recycle when the target audience is at the contemplation and preparation phases.

Originality/value

Whilst both critics and proponents of the adoption of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing initiatives have provided relevant arguments, the debate had remained largely theoretical. This study discusses the limitations of the traditional marketing mix in behaviour change programmes and the need for a segmented approach based on the stages of behaviour change when using the 4Ps. However, given the hegemony of the 4Ps in the social marketing literature, this study sheds light on the appropriate “Ps” to activate to influence recycling behavioural intention at different stages of change.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Stanley G. Harris and Michael S. Cole

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic…

Downloads
4636

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic literature as a useful framework for understanding the dynamics of motivation to change problem behaviors, in a leadership development context.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of over 70 supervisors/managers was studied over a period of nine months as they participated in a company‐sponsored leadership development effort.

Findings

Results provide initial evidence that the stages of change model has the potential for being reliably and validly assessed in a leadership development context. Participants' stage scores related in meaningful ways to relevant criteria such as job attitudes, perceptions of personal leadership areas needing improvement, and evaluations of actual development module content and presentation over a nine‐month period.

Research limitations/implications

Participants were drawn from only one organization and this was the first major leadership development effort undertaken by this organization.

Practical implications

Study results provide support for the appropriateness of applying the stages of change model and its measurement in a leadership development context. Results demonstrate that the stages of change model appears to offer useful and pragmatic insight into motivation to learn and on improving the effectiveness of leadership development activities.

Originality/value

The present study is unique in that makes use of a stages of change model to empirically examine differential patterns of relationships between participants' stages of change and their organizational attitudes, leadership developmental needs, and longitudinal reactions to the development effort.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Liz Logie‐MacIver, Maria Piacentini and Douglas Eadie

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of qualitative approaches to add depth and insight to understanding concerning the issues involved when consumers try to…

Downloads
3874

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of qualitative approaches to add depth and insight to understanding concerning the issues involved when consumers try to make changes in their behaviour. The context of this study is people trying to make and sustain changes to their dietary behaviour. Taking Prochaska and Di Clemente's Stages of Change model as the starting point, this paper marks a departure from other work in the behavioural change area in so far as a qualitative approach is adopted rather than a quantitative perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was longitudinal in design and the data presented concern groups of people who were categorized as belonging to stages of change and who followed a similar stage of change pattern over a period of 18 months (according to the Stage of Change algorithm described by Curry et al.).

Findings

By examining peoples' behaviour changes in depth, the similarities and differences in their attitudes and motivations are revealed in terms of their dietary behaviour change and maintenance of change. This provides a more refined understanding of how people make changes and maintain them over time.

Research limitations/implications

While focusing only on a small number of people, the weaknesses of the Stages of Change model is demonstrated and how qualitative research approaches can be used to add depth and meaning to quantitative methodologies popular in the social marketing domain.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the Stages of Change model has value in categorizing people into stages of change and measuring these changes over time but is limited in its ability to develop understanding of the lived experience of trying to change behaviour.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Cristian Castillo, Vicenc Fernandez and Jose Maria Sallan

The purpose of this paper is to define a model that both describes the evolution of the emotional stages of individuals during perceived negative organizational change and…

Downloads
4954

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a model that both describes the evolution of the emotional stages of individuals during perceived negative organizational change and explains the evolution of their behavioral patterns and the effects on relationships with social environments (family, friends, co-workers, supervisor and organization).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodological research design was adopted, using individual interviews as the primary method of qualitative data collection. In total, 15 people who experienced perceived negative organizational changes participated in this research.

Findings

Through empirical qualitative research, an adapted Kübler (1969) model was used as a starting point. Co-occurrence analysis of the interviews led to the combination of the first two stages (denial and anger) of this model because they always appeared together. Two new stages (revising and deserting), based on the research of Schalk and Roe (2007), complete the model. Subsequently, the model comprised six emotional stages: denial and anger, bargaining, depression, revising, deserting and acceptance. The results show that individuals can move freely between the first four stages, but deserting and acceptance are always the final stages. Experiencing these emotional stages can influence the relationships between individuals and their social environments. During “denial and anger” and “bargaining,” the relationships with family, friends and co-workers improve; but during depression, the relationships with family and friends deteriorate, but because co-workers become much more important, those relationships improve. Relationships with supervisors deteriorate during denial and anger and depression but remain stable during bargaining.

Research limitations/implications

Time’s passage became an inconvenience accounted for during data collection. Over time, separate events can be confused, and nuances that were once determinants can be eliminated. Longitudinal studies at various stages of the change process would complement these results.

Practical implications

These results can guide managers in foreseeing and anticipating the actions that would reduce the emotional impact of organizational change and mitigate the impact of individuals’ negative emotions on the organization.

Originality/value

This paper extends the existing theory about the strategies of coping and organizational changes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Alain Tambe Ebot

Phishing remains a major cybersecurity problem. Mainly adopting variance approaches, researchers have suggested several recommendations to help users avoid being…

Abstract

Purpose

Phishing remains a major cybersecurity problem. Mainly adopting variance approaches, researchers have suggested several recommendations to help users avoid being victimized in phishing attacks. However, the evidence suggests that anti-phishing recommendations are not very effective. The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to analyze why the existing anti-phishing recommendations may not be very effective; second, to propose stage theorizing as an additional approach for studying phishing that can contribute toward more effective recommendations; and third, to demonstrate using a stage theory, how IS researchers can utilize the concept of stages in phishing research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on findings from previous empirical phishing research to assess whether the reasons why people are victimized in phishing attacks can be categorized into stages. The criteria for stages of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) are used as an example.

Findings

Analysis indicates support for the existence of stages of phishing victims. The criteria for stages of the TTM were applied to the reasons that subjects in previous studies gave for clicking on phishing links and to the anti-phishing recommendations proposed in previous studies. There was overall support for four of the five criteria of the TTM. The results from the current study indicate that a targeted approach is a better approach to proposing anti-phishing recommendations.

Practical implications

The analysis identified the stages of phishing victims and the processes of change for each stage. It is suggested that recommendations against phishing should target individuals based on their resident stages. Moreover, the processes of change should be applied to the correct stage for the recommendations to be effective.

Originality/value

From a phishing perspective, there is a lack of research based on stage theorizing. The current study presents stage theorizing as an additional approach to the existing approaches and demonstrates how a stage theory can be used to make more effective recommendations against phishing. The study has thrown light on the benefits of stage theorizing and how its approach to targeted recommendations can be useful in IS security research.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Jeffery Houghton, Christopher Neck and Kenneth Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that nutritious food intake is a somewhat overlooked yet essential aspect of corporate wellness that has the potential to help…

Downloads
1359

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that nutritious food intake is a somewhat overlooked yet essential aspect of corporate wellness that has the potential to help provide organizations with a sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first discusses the resource‐based view, identifying ways in which nutritious food intake across an organization may serve to create rare and inimitable organizational resources leading to a competitive advantage. It then presents a basic overview of the fundamentals of nutritious food intake. It proceeds to review the transtheoretical stages of change model in the context of tailored nutrition interventions in organizations, providing a detailed overview of key individual behavior focused and environmental focused change strategies along with a discussion of types of technical delivery systems.

Findings

The paper suggests that an organization may be able to use a tailored stage‐based nutrition intervention as part of a comprehensive wellness program in order to help create a sustainable competitive advantage based on the nutritious food intake of its members.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should continue to examine the effectiveness of stage‐based computer tailored nutrition interventions and their delivery systems, particularly in the context of comprehensive corporate wellness plans and the extent to which this serves to create a competitive advantage through lower direct healthcare costs and higher worker productivity.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders should carefully consider the strategies and methodologies presented in this paper when designing and implementing nutrition interventions as part of a broad corporate wellness program.

Originality/value

This paper makes a valuable contribution to the organizational literature by recognizing the potential for the application of the transtheoretical stages of change model from the field of nutrition education within the context of the resource‐based view of organizations.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Tanya R. Berry, Ronald C. Plotnikoff, Kim Raine, Donna Anderson and P.J. Naylor

The purpose of this research is to examine the organizational stages of change construct of the transtheoretical model of behavior change.

Downloads
1611

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the organizational stages of change construct of the transtheoretical model of behavior change.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on organizational and individual stages of change for tobacco reduction, physical activity promotion, and heart healthy eating promotion were collected from service provider, senior management, and board level members of provincial health authorities across three data collection periods.

Findings

Results revealed significant correlations between individual and organizational stages of change for management level respondents, but inconsistent relationships for service providers and no significant correlations for board level respondents. There were no significant differences between respondent levels for organizational stage of change for any of the promotion behaviors. In general, changes in stage failed to predict whether there was a belief in an organization's capability of addressing any of the health promotion activities. There was also a large amount of variance between individual respondents for most health authorities in their reported organizational stages of change for physical activity and healthy eating.

Practical implications

Based on the results of the present study it is concluded that there is little evidence that the organizational stages of change construct is valid. The evidence indicates that assessing individual readiness within an organization may be as effective as asking individuals to report on organizational stages of readiness.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the validity of the organizational stages of change construct in a health promotion context and provides information for those who are considering using it.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2018

Bahija Zeidan, Stephanie Ruth Partridge, Kate Balestracci and Margaret Allman-Farinelli

Young adults frequently engage in sub-optimal dietary behaviours, such as inadequate intakes of fruits and vegetables and excessive consumption of take-out meals…

Abstract

Purpose

Young adults frequently engage in sub-optimal dietary behaviours, such as inadequate intakes of fruits and vegetables and excessive consumption of take-out meals. Theory-based interventions are suggested to promote dietary change. The transtheoretical model is an example that stages an individual’s readiness to change behaviours as precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance, and includes a series of processes that help people move between stages. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether self-reported usual dietary intakes of fruits and vegetables and take-out foods differ by reported stage-of-change.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data from 250 overweight young adults, aged 18-35 years, who enrolled in a lifestyle intervention to prevent weight gain are analysed. Participant’s stage-of-change for increasing fruit and vegetable intakes and reducing take-out foods is determined using staging algorithms. This is compared with self-reported dietary intakes over the past month using a food frequency questionnaire. Differences in intakes and variety by stage-of-change are compared for fruits, vegetables and take-out foods.

Findings

Take-out foods differed between stages (p < 0.0001), with lower weekly intakes in action (309 g) and maintenance (316 g) compared with preparation (573 g). Daily fruit intakes and variety scores varied by stage-of-change (p < 0.0001), being highest for action and maintenance (261 g and 263 g, respectively, and variety scores of 1 and 2) compared with precontemplation, contemplation and preparation (all = 100 g and 0 for variety). Daily vegetable consumption and variety scores differed by stage (p = 0.009 and p = 0.025, respectively) being highest for action/maintenance (204 g and 2 for variety) versus precontemplation and preparation (<110 g daily and Variety 1).

Practical implications

The finding of no differences in intakes between precontemplation, contemplation or preparation stages implies that the adoption of the dietary behaviours is not a continuum but a move from pre-action to actioning the target intakes. This means that for planning health promotion and dietary counselling, assigning people to the three different pre-action stages may be unnecessary.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the congruence of self-reported readiness to change behaviour with dietary intakes of take-out foods as well as variety of fruit and vegetables in overweight young adults.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Jennifer E. van Bekkum, Joanne M. Williams and Paul Graham Morris

The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of cycle commuting barriers in relation to stage of change, gender and occupational role. Stage of change is a key…

Downloads
2688

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of cycle commuting barriers in relation to stage of change, gender and occupational role. Stage of change is a key construct of the transtheoretical model of behaviour change that defines behavioural readiness (intentions and actions) into five distinct categories.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional online questionnaire was completed by staff and PhD students (n=831) based in cycle‐friendly buildings in a large UK university. The questionnaire included questions relating to demographics, stages of behaviour change and 18 potential barriers. Data were analysed using t‐tests, one‐way ANOVAs and two‐way ANOVAs.

Findings

Overall, environmental factors were perceived as the biggest barriers to cycle commuting. However, perceptions of cycle commuting barriers significantly differed between stages of change, genders and occupational roles. Precontemplators, females and support staff commonly perceived greater barriers to cycle commuting compared to maintainers, males and academic staff.

Practical implications

The results indicate that tailored individual‐level behaviour change interventions focusing on reducing perceptions of barriers that take into account stage of change, gender and occupational differences may play a role in encouraging people to cycle to work.

Originality/value

The study reveals evidence of a significant subjective element involved in perception formation of some potential barriers associated with cycle commuting. Women not only hold stronger perceptions compared to males of risk‐orientated barriers but also of more general barriers associated with cycle commuting. The findings also suggest that occupational roles may influence an individual's perceptions of cycle commuting barriers.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Neil S. Coulson

Describes a study which applied the stages of change model formulated by Prochaska and DiClemente to consumer use of food labels. A total of 165 students completed a…

Downloads
3153

Abstract

Describes a study which applied the stages of change model formulated by Prochaska and DiClemente to consumer use of food labels. A total of 165 students completed a self‐report questionnaire measuring stages of change, decisional balance, dietary behaviour and food choice motivations. The percentage of participants classified into each stage was as follows: precontemplation 30.0, contemplation 4.5, action 16.4 and maintenance 49.1. Significant associations with stage of change and decisional balance were observed. In addition, consumption of fruit and fatty foods was associated with stage of change as was a range of motivational factors in food choice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 148000