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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Lyn Martin

Although the nursing profession is a largeoccupational group and a major part of the NationalHealth Service, surprisingly little is known aboutthe demand for and supply of…

Abstract

Although the nursing profession is a large occupational group and a major part of the National Health Service, surprisingly little is known about the demand for and supply of nurses. Current demographic trends, however, have ensured that a traditional “easy in/easy out” model of recruitment and retention, with high wastage rates during and after training, is being replaced by the idea that nurse education is a valuable and expensive investment and trained nurses must be encouraged to view nursing as a life‐time career. In 1988 there was considerable media interest in shortages of skilled nurses. A number of factors are examined, relevant to assessing whether there are such shortages. In particular, the demand for nurses, manpower and financial aspects of supply, recruitment and retention, and skill mix are considered. Two groups of nurses in which there are said to be shortages are briefly discussed: paediatric intensive care and community mental handicap and mental illness nurses.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Linda Lill

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the labor shortage is described at the national level and how these problematizations correlate to gender and diversity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the labor shortage is described at the national level and how these problematizations correlate to gender and diversity politics. The paper is overview of the governance of staff shortages in elderly care, how it is articulated and how the governmental scenario of solutions, which includes the channeling of unemployed migrants into elderly care. Politicians and public media describe the situation as desperate and the issue of the staff shortages in elderly care is described as a state of crisis. A highly profiled solution is to open up elderly care for unemployed migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

By analyzing specific management strategies for controlling a phenomenon, the paper will also be able to highlight values surrounding the phenomenon. The ambition is to understand how institutions, authorities and organizations handle practical forms of knowledge that are aimed to implement a particular policy or working method within the welfare system.

Findings

One important aspect of the findings is the ways in which these official political discourses link the issues of migration and the shortages of staff in elderly care. But also visualize factors in how the government bodies with the formal responsibilities and authorities express their concerns about these links and the quality of the elderly care more generally.

Originality/value

It is well-known that migrants are employed to take care of the growing population of elderly in Europe. In Spain and Italy, for example, immigrants are frequently employed directly by families to care for their elderly family members. This type of employment entails a series of new social risks. The most important of those risks is the global “care chain” that these arrangements incur for the sending families, who lose a family member on whom they depend. This paper is connecting the international research on the global “care chain,” but focuses on the Swedish context, where the migrants already are established and elderly care work is not linked to migration in the same way. However, the experience of migration and the importance of transnational and cultural knowledge can be influential in understanding the changing processes in Swedish elderly care, not the least as the question of staff recruitment has been linked to migration by the highest political levels.

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International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Karin Newman and Uvanney Maylor

The statistics and associated literature reveal a chronic shortage of nurses and midwives and difficulties in recruiting and retaining D and E grades, the main providers…

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3341

Abstract

The statistics and associated literature reveal a chronic shortage of nurses and midwives and difficulties in recruiting and retaining D and E grades, the main providers of hands‐on patient care. This qualitative exploratory study of nurse satisfaction, dissatisfaction and reasons for staying provides empirical support for a conceptual model “the nurse satisfaction, quality of care and patient satisfaction chain”. The in‐depth interviews reveal a spontaneous and explicit linking of organisational resources to nurses’ ability to provide the level of patient care commensurate with their desire and patients’ needs. Nurse job satisfaction derives from knowing that they have provided good care as well as the attributes of the job such as a career, skill acquisition and the “people I work with”. Job dissatisfaction stems primarily from staff shortages, the behaviour of patients and negative media comment. The interviews demonstrate the critical role of the “ability to give quality care” and the satisfaction derived from patients’ demonstration of their appreciation and the influence of this on nurse retention.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Karin Newman, Uvanney Maylor and Bal Chansarkar

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors…

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9892

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors influencing nurse satisfaction and retention; empirical support for the robustness of a conceptual framework or model “the nurse satisfaction, service quality and nurse retention chain”; and some managerial considerations for recruitment and retention. The three main factors influencing job satisfaction were patients, the inherent characteristics of nursing and the nursing team; the two main sources of job dissatisfaction were staff shortages and poor management and amongst nurse retention strategies improving working conditions was more important than increased pay. For recruitment, as well as retention, improving the image and reputation of nursing along with improvements in work‐life balance were pre‐requisites for meeting the challenging target of an additional 20,000 nurses on the wards by 2004.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Andrew K. Weyman, Deborah Roy and Peter Nolan

Staff shortage in the UK National Health Service has a long history, but is widely predicted to become acute over the next decade. Falling enrolment rates in health…

Abstract

Purpose

Staff shortage in the UK National Health Service has a long history, but is widely predicted to become acute over the next decade. Falling enrolment rates in health professional training and restrictions to migrant labour recruitment have brought the, traditionally neglected, issue of staff retention into sharp relief. The purpose of this paper is to represent the first large scale systematic appraisal of the relative salience of recognised headline drivers of employee exodus from the NHS.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from an opportunity sample of 1,594 health professionals, managers and administrators employed by the NHS. Participants completed a paired ranking task (Case V method of paired comparisons, Thurston, 1927) to determine the relative importance of eight widely cited reasons for exit. The item set was derived from focus groups conducted as a component of the wider study.

Findings

Findings revealed almost universal consensus regarding the primacy of shortage of resources, job demands and time pressure. Pay was ranked lower than predicted. Flexible working arrangements do not presented as a key solution, and there is no support for claims of generational differences.

Research limitations/implications

Survivor population effects could constitute a source of sample bias, i.e. all participants were current NHS employees. It is possible that those who remain may be more resilient or hold different dispositions to leavers. Thus, comparisons by age and grade may not be comparing like with like. Tapping respondent beliefs about the actions of peers can embody some degree of inaccuracy and attribution bias. However, effects can be considered to operate as a source of common, rather than systematic, error across the demographics compared. The medical and dental sample was too small to give confidence in detected differences.

Practical implications

Findings challenge the claim that wider availability of flexible working hours will significantly reduce exit rates. Pay, being a source of dissatisfaction, does not constitute a key push variable in itself, rather its salience reflects the effort reward-imbalance produced by rises in job demands.

Social implications

Staff shortages in the NHS represent a threat to: public well-being – waiting lists and demand for care; the well-being of who continue to work in the NHS – job demands and resources; the employment prospects of staff who leave involuntarily, e.g. on grounds of incapacity and threats to health and well-being – extending to impacts on their dependents.

Originality/value

Issues of staff retention within the NHS are topical and under researched. The findings provide an up to date picture of the relative influence of headline drivers of early exit from the NHS. The study draws upon a more diverse and comprehensive sample of NHS employees that any other known previous studies of early exit. Findings are of potential international relevance to other State health systems. The authors believe this to be the largest (sample) known application of the method of paired comparisons.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Sana Rabab, Jack Tomlin, Nick Huband and Birgit Völlm

Patients detained in high-security psychiatric hospitals are particularly vulnerable to excessive restrictions and exploitation. In the UK, the care quality commission…

Abstract

Purpose

Patients detained in high-security psychiatric hospitals are particularly vulnerable to excessive restrictions and exploitation. In the UK, the care quality commission (CQC) monitors and regulates forensic healthcare provision. The purpose of this study is to identify key concerns highlighted in CQC inspection reports of the three high-secure hospitals in England between 2010 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, 49 CQC inspection reports from three high-secure hospitals were subjected to thematic analysis.

Findings

Five central themes emerged: staffing and management; restrictive practice; physical environment and ward atmosphere; patients’ needs and involvement in their care; and legal and statutory matters. There was some variation in the overall quality of care between the hospitals. Positive staff–patient interactions and good practice in assessing and delivering care were consistently observed. However, enduring staff shortages within each hospital were experienced negatively and sometimes co-occurred with concerns over restrictive practices, poor care-plan procedure and inadequate legal documentation. Over time, Rampton and Broadmoor Hospitals appeared to worsen with regard to staffing levels, staff morale and management involvement. While services progressed over time in providing patients with access to advocacy and information concerning their rights, in some recent inspections it remained unclear whether patients were adequately involved in the care-plan process.

Practical implications

These findings provide preliminary indicators for areas requiring further attention from policymakers, clinicians and advocates.

Originality/value

This study appears to be the first systematic analysis of key concerns expressed in CQC reports of English high-security hospitals.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2007

John Pratten and Barbara O'Leary

To outline the reasons for staff shortages in the UK catering industry and then to decide if further training could help to address these issues.

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3211

Abstract

Purpose

To outline the reasons for staff shortages in the UK catering industry and then to decide if further training could help to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives have been achieved by examining the training provisions at a college, and then asking the students, their training staff, employers and employees about their needs.

Findings

The study has revealed that the basic training available is suitable for purpose. However, the career ambitions of the students were focussed on restaurants, and they ignored the other catering outlets. A greater knowledge of other forms of employment could retain more staff within the industry. In addition, restaurants could offer greater training to their staff, particularly as the need to manage new skills such as stock control are encountered.

Research limitations/implications

It should be noted that this study merely reports on one small area of the country, and is further limited by small samples. To make more definitive suggestions, a more extensive study should be undertaken.

Practical implications

The work suggests that greater co‐ordination between the training provider and all sections of the industry could ensure that more catering staff remain within the sector.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this paper will initiate debate on the issue of staff retention and persuade the non‐restaurant sector to act more positively on the issue.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Adelina Broadbridge

Adoption of a cost cutting or quantitative approach to labour scheduling in companies espousing an enhanced customer service is examined. Using empirical evidence from the…

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2208

Abstract

Adoption of a cost cutting or quantitative approach to labour scheduling in companies espousing an enhanced customer service is examined. Using empirical evidence from the labour scheduling process at one supermarket chain, the paper demonstrates that the longer‐term negative effects of adopting a purely quantitative approach to labour scheduling and the resultant staff shortages can lead to decreased employee well‐being, increased absenteeism and staff turnover levels. In turn, this not only pushes up costs of employment, but results in reduced customer service levels. Concludes that for many retailers a tension exists between espoused company thinking and organisational reality. For retailers with a commitment to a total customer service strategy such a quantitative approach to staffing issues is ineffective in the longer term.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Zofia Bajorek and David Guest

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the recent literature on employment of temporary workers by exploring the impact of temporary workers on the perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the recent literature on employment of temporary workers by exploring the impact of temporary workers on the perceptions, attitudes and behaviour of permanent staff with particular reference to their implications for patient safety and service quality in hospital accident and emergency departments. The analysis is set in the context of the job demands-resources theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was undertaken using a case study approach with semi-structured interviews in two London hospitals. Participants included staff from the HR director level, clinical managers and permanent staff who all had an influence in the hiring and management of temporary staff in some way. Transcripts were analysed thematically using an adopted framework approach.

Findings

The results indicate that the effect of temporary staff on permanent staff depended on the quality of the “resource”. There was a “hierarchy of preference” for temporary staff based on their familiarity with the context. Those unfamiliar with the department served as a distraction to permanent staff due to the need to “manage” them in various ways. While this was rarely perceived to affect patient safety, it could have an impact on service quality by causing delays and interruptions. In line with previous research, the use of temporary staff also affected perceptions of fairness and the commitment of some permanent staff.

Practical implications

A model developing an approach for improved practice when managing temporary staff was developed to minimise the risks to patient safety and service quality, and improve permanent staff morale.

Social implications

The review highlights the difficulties that a limited amount of temporary staff integration can have on permanent staff and patient care, indicating that consideration must be placed on how temporary staff are inducted and clarifying expectations of roles for both temporary and permanent staff.

Originality/value

This paper studies the under-researched impact of temporary staff, and, distinctively, staff employed on a single shift, on the behaviour and attitudes of permanent staff. It highlights the need to consider carefully the qualitative nature of “resources” in the job demands-resources theory.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Yadeed B. Lobo and Suzanne Wilkinson

In the light of international skills shortages at different levels of the construction industry, this research assesses solutions to skills shortages in the construction…

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4115

Abstract

Purpose

In the light of international skills shortages at different levels of the construction industry, this research assesses solutions to skills shortages in the construction industry drawing on research from New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The way in which the research objectives were achieved was a mix of qualitative and quantitative research. Grounded theory technique was used in the research.

Findings

New Zealand currently uses a variety of techniques to tackle construction industry skills shortages, such as increased wages, overseas recruitment and reformatting training requirements, but still there is a shortage of skilled and semi‐skilled workers for the construction industry. The results of the in‐depth interviews of leading practitioners in New Zealand show how different sectors – government, education and industry – provide different solutions but that ultimately a joint focus on education and training will have the biggest long‐term impact on skills shortages.

Practical implications

The paper serves as an illustration to other countries on how New Zealand is solving the construction industry skills shortages. These solutions have practical implications for other countries.

Originality/value

The research provides an original assessment of the types of shortages faced in New Zealand and the ways in which they can be solved.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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