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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Nitza Geri, Ruti Gafni and Peter Bengov

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate extrinsic motivations that may affect adding or acknowledging user-generated content (UGC) on business websites…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate extrinsic motivations that may affect adding or acknowledging user-generated content (UGC) on business websites, which are based on voluntary crowdsourcing.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of extrinsic motivations for knowledge sharing in UGC-based websites was developed, suggesting reciprocity, awareness of rewards and prestige as main extrinsic motivations for adding content. The model was examined via an online survey of users of three websites that varied in the attributes of knowledge shared and reward type: The Traveler (tangible rewards), Stack Overflow (virtual rewards) and Waze (virtual rewards).

Findings

Importance of extrinsic motivations varied among websites, as it may be affected by attributes of the knowledge shared. Reciprocity positively affected recommending the website, and adding content affected acknowledging content.

Research limitations/implications

Investigating extrinsic motivations is important because websites may take actions that affect them. Further research is required to reveal the potential of voluntary crowdsourcing in business contexts addressing both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, prosumption and open innovation.

Practical implications

When reciprocity is a major aspect of a UGC website, badges and similar mechanisms may serve as a main extrinsic motivation to share knowledge.

Originality/value

The novel empirically validated model provides theoretical and practical insights for designing mechanisms for increasing extrinsic motivation for knowledge sharing according to specific characteristics of UGC websites.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Zhi Liu, Xiaosong Zhang, Yue Wu and Ting Chen

The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to detect Indirect Memory‐Corruption Exploit (IMCE) at runtime on binary code, which is often caused by integer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to detect Indirect Memory‐Corruption Exploit (IMCE) at runtime on binary code, which is often caused by integer conversion error. Real‐world attacks were evaluated for experimentation.

Design/methodology/approach

Current dynamic analysis detects attacks by enforcing low level policy which can only detect control‐flow hijacking attack. The proposed approach detects IMCE with high level policy enforcement using dynamic taint analysis. Unlike low‐level policy enforced on instruction level, the authors' policy is imposed on memory operation routine. The authors implemented a fine‐grained taint analysis system with accurate taint propagation for detection.

Findings

Conversion errors are common and most of them are legitimate. Taint analysis with high‐level policy can accurately block IMCE but have false positives. Proper design of data structures to maintain taint tag can greatly improve overhead.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an approach to block IMCE with high‐level policy enforcement using taint analysis. It has very low false negatives, though still causes certain false positives. The authors made several implementation contributions to strengthen accuracy and performance.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Isabel Oliveira Jordao do Amaral and Minhyung Kang

This research investigates the detailed mechanisms of how gamification affordances influence intrinsic and internalized extrinsic motivation and ultimately improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the detailed mechanisms of how gamification affordances influence intrinsic and internalized extrinsic motivation and ultimately improve the quality and quantity of knowledge contribution.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from 154 users of Stack Overflow in Portuguese were analyzed by the partial least squares–structural equation modeling approach to validate the research model.

Findings

Challenge and goal setting influence individuals to reach the flow state, which increases the quantity of knowledge contribution. Rewards enhance the quality of knowledge contribution through perceived self-worth. Social comparison increases perceived reputation, but its impact does not ultimately lead to knowledge contribution.

Originality/value

The current study differentiated types of motivation and dimensions of knowledge contribution when exploring the effects of gamification affordances. This perspective was proven helpful to understand the various gamification affordances' influence on knowledge contribution.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Mousa Abu Kashef, Athula Ginige and Ana Hol

The purpose of this paper was to develop a framework of working-together relations and investigate ways to enhance working-together relations among people, organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to develop a framework of working-together relations and investigate ways to enhance working-together relations among people, organisations, communities and neighbourhoods using working-together applications. Today, people in communities, neighbourhoods and constituencies often work together in a coalition of public, private and non-profit institutions. The technology used today has enabled new forms of communications and collaboration. The rapid growth of mobile technologies and interactive, collaborative applications based on Web technologies has enabled the development of new approaches to derive and share organisational and local knowledge. Not all of these applications have succeeded; after a certain time, users tend to stop using online applications that do not assist them in developing collaborative practices with their team members.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand the essential characteristics of a successful online application that effectively supports people to work together, the authors undertook an inductive analysis of related literature and existing social media application.

Findings

By combining and categorising the findings, it was possible to articulate the characteristics associated with four identified categories of working-together relations: networking, coordination, cooperation and collaboration. The study also identified essential activities that are performed in each working-together category and the factors that enable successful working-together relations: trust, risk and rewards.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies will look into how applications could be further enhanced, so that, for example, an application that is currently classified as “coordination” could be improved and the required characteristics of “collaboration” could be met.

Practical implications

It is expected that the framework derived will assist in the design of successful online applications to support different categories of working-together relations.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is a new framework that can now be used to identify how effective an existing application can be in assisting the working-together relations.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Bryan M. Howell

Technology moves fast. If you do ot iterate and plan with agility, a new approach will come along, and you will miss it. This premise from Ferris Bueller. Cheesy or not…

Abstract

Technology moves fast. If you do ot iterate and plan with agility, a new approach will come along, and you will miss it. This premise from Ferris Bueller. Cheesy or not, it does not make it any less factual. The author learned many new concepts in doing the research for this chapter. There were several “aha!” moments that warrant sharing. The research here garnered an opinion that relates to the concept of balance. The moment an organism or organization is closest to “balanced” is when it has optimal performance. Modern IT projects require Agile methodologies. Many organizations do not necessitate the same agility in the departments that the IT organization supports. It is the author’s opinion that this imbalance can cause problems with IT or company projects before they start.

As far as technologies the only thing that anyone can say definitively is that technology will change and that those changes will accelerate. Given that information, the best that any practitioner can do is write programming logic that uses robust, clean baseline technology that follows an existing pattern or standard, and then hope that the next piece of sliced bread builds on the premise of the previous loaf. The way people interface with technology is shifting with the advent of smartphones and tablets. The engineers of the future must understand and apply very sound logic in setting up new systems. The systems of the future are likely continuously deployed and a large portion of the programming logic will auto-generated based on the inputs coming into the system.

Details

Advances in the Technology of Managing People: Contemporary Issues in Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-074-6

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Mark Chong, Benjamin Kok Siew Gan and Thomas Menkhoff

This paper aims to share how an Asian university enhanced students’ global competence through international business study missions (BSMs). More specifically, it focuses…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share how an Asian university enhanced students’ global competence through international business study missions (BSMs). More specifically, it focuses on how the design of these BSMs enabled “deep” learning beyond industry tourism and how 21st-century competencies such as “global competence” can be acquired through participation in short-term, faculty-led study missions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the case study approach, it critically analyzes the learning goals and objectives, design decisions, implementation details and learning outcomes underlying three BSMs led by three instructors from the same university to the USA (New York), Germany (Berlin and Stuttgart) and South Korea (Seoul).

Findings

The study shows that students gained global competencies related to specific fields of study such as the creative industries, urban sustainability and entrepreneurship. It shows how design choices such as destination, range of organizations, length of individual visits, range of pedagogical techniques, intensity of preparation and quality of management contribute to students’ acquisition of global competencies.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents a subset of case studies that may limit the generalization of the findings; the bias that results from an unrepresentative, opportunistic sample (selection bias); and lack of quantitative causality in a qualitative evaluation.

Practical implications

The course design described here provides practical information for designing study abroad “deep” learning goals, objectives and outcomes focusing on global competence.

Originality/value

The detailed case studies of three instructors from different disciplines to achieve the country’s education vision of globally competent students.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Qamar Naith and Fabio Ciravegna

This paper aims to gauge developers’ perspectives regarding the participation of the public and anonymous crowd testers worldwide, with a range of varied experiences. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gauge developers’ perspectives regarding the participation of the public and anonymous crowd testers worldwide, with a range of varied experiences. It also aims to gather their needs that could reduce their concerns of dealing with the public crowd testers and increase the opportunity of using the crowdtesting platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

An online exploratory survey was conducted to gather information from the participants, which included 50 mobile application developers from various countries with diverse experiences across Android and iOS mobile platforms.

Findings

The findings revealed that a significant proportion (90%) of developers is potentially willing to perform testing via the public crowd testers worldwide. This on condition that several fundamental features were available, which enable them to achieve more realistic tests without artificial environments on large numbers of devices. The results also demonstrated that a group of developers does not consider testing as a serious job that they have to pay for, which can affect the gig-economy and global market.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insights for future research in the study of how acceptable it is to work with public and anonymous crowd workers, with varying levels of experience, to perform tasks in different domains and not only in software testing. In addition, it will assist individual or small development teams who have limited resources or who do not have thousands of testers in their private testing community, to perform large-scale testing of their products.

Details

International Journal of Crowd Science, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7294

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2006

Haiying Zhou, Kun Mean Hou and Christophe De Vaulx

Traditional embedded operation systems are resource consuming multitask, thus they are not adapted for smart wireless sensors. This paper presents a super‐small…

Abstract

Traditional embedded operation systems are resource consuming multitask, thus they are not adapted for smart wireless sensors. This paper presents a super‐small distributed real‐time microkernel (SDREAM) dedicated to wireless sensors. SDREAM is a tuple‐based message‐driven real‐time kernel. It adopts a meta language: Kernel Modeling Language to define and describe the system primitives in abstract manner. The IPC and processes synchronization are based on the LINDA concept: the tuple model implemented by two light primitives (SND: OUT & RCV: IN). In SDREAM, tasks are classified into two categories: periodic and priority. The periodic task has the highest priority level and is responsible for capturing sensor signals or actuating control signals; the priority task has various priority levels and is suitable for time‐constraints applications. A two‐level task scheduling policy scheme, named priority‐based pre‐emptive scheduling, is used for task scheduling. SDREAM is simple and efficient. It has a flexible hardware abstraction capability that enables it to be rapidly ported into different WSN platforms and other tiny embedded devices. Currently, it has been ported and evaluated in several hardware platforms. The performance results show SDREAM requires tiny resource and is suitable and efficient for hard real‐time multitask WSN applications.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2018

Arshad Ahmad, Chong Feng, Shi Ge and Abdallah Yousif

Software developers extensively use stack overflow (SO) for knowledge sharing on software development. Thus, software engineering researchers have started mining the…

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1126

Abstract

Purpose

Software developers extensively use stack overflow (SO) for knowledge sharing on software development. Thus, software engineering researchers have started mining the structured/unstructured data present in certain software repositories including the Q&A software developer community SO, with the aim to improve software development. The purpose of this paper is show that how academics/practitioners can get benefit from the valuable user-generated content shared on various online social networks, specifically from Q&A community SO for software development.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review was conducted and 166 research papers on SO were categorized about software development from the inception of SO till June 2016.

Findings

Most of the studies revolve around a limited number of software development tasks; approximately 70 percent of the papers used millions of posts data, applied basic machine learning methods, and conducted investigations semi-automatically and quantitative studies. Thus, future research should focus on the overcoming existing identified challenges and gaps.

Practical implications

The work on SO is classified into two main categories; “SO design and usage” and “SO content applications.” These categories not only give insights to Q&A forum providers about the shortcomings in design and usage of such forums but also provide ways to overcome them in future. It also enables software developers to exploit such forums for the identified under-utilized tasks of software development.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind to explore the work on SO about software development and makes an original contribution by presenting a comprehensive review, design/usage shortcomings of Q&A sites, and future research challenges.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Swarm Leadership and the Collective Mind
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-200-8

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