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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Shrimal Perera, Michael Skully and My Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the level of market concentration in Sri Lanka's banking sector is positively associated with bank‐specific interest…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the level of market concentration in Sri Lanka's banking sector is positively associated with bank‐specific interest spreads after controlling for other bank‐specific and exogenous influences.

Design/methodology/approach

A pooled, time‐series and cross‐section model is utilized which distinguishes between banks’ dominance in loan and deposit market segments. Results are presented for the total sample as well as for a truncated sample of private‐owned banks.

Findings

Changes in industry concentration do not affect bank‐level interest margins of Sri Lankan banks. Nevertheless, the dominant Sri Lankan banks seem to extract them and banks’ cost structures are priced in their interest spreads. The less‐capitalized, high risk banks operate with narrow interest margins, possibly due to the relatively higher deposit rates they pay to attract deposits. Although regulatory changes seem to have no effect, the growing capital market exerts negative pricing pressure on Sri Lankan banks.

Practical implications

The regulators should closely watch banks with larger loan and deposit market shares because they seem to exploit their dominant presence and geographical reach to extract higher spreads. Similarly, state‐owned banks should also draw regulatory attention for they extract higher interest margins, possibly, in lieu of their high operational inefficiency levels.

Originality/value

The authors employ an extended time‐series and cross‐section model which controls for sample heterogeneity using proxies for cost structures, risk profiles, regulatory restrictions and other environmental influences. Moreover, as far as it could be ascertained, this is the first such study on Sri Lanka's banking sector.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

J.A.S.K. Jayakody and W.M.A. Sanjeewani

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of transformational leadership behavior of salespersons on the level of customers' trust and customers' relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of transformational leadership behavior of salespersons on the level of customers' trust and customers' relationship commitment with the salespersons in the Sri Lankan corporate banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature, it was hypothesized that idealized influence behavior and individualized considerate behavior of salespersons positively affect customers' trust and customers' relationship commitment. A survey was undertaken among 47 sales persons in the Sri Lankan corporate banking sector, and the regression analysis was performed to test hypotheses.

Findings

It was found that idealized influence behavior of salespersons positively influences customer trust, which, together with individualized consideration of salespersons, in turn influences customer commitment. It was also found that the joint effect of both customers' trust and individualized considerate behavior of the salesperson is greater than each alone on customers' relationship commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample and non‐probabilistic sampling procedure demand further corroboration of the findings. As the relationship marketing literature stresses the coexistence of both relationship and transactional marketing, future researchers may use the full‐range of leadership model.

Practical implications/implications

This study shows how the two facets of transformational leadership behavior of salespersons implicate their customers' relationship marketing behavior, and thus points out how leadership development training can be adapted to improve relationship marketing skills of sales persons.

Originality/value

The present paper illustrates how transformational leadership provides a more appropriate knowledge domain for understanding relationship marketing dynamics at salesperson‐individual customer level.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Wagner Junior Ladeira, Fernando De Oliveira Santini, Cláudio Hoffmann Sampaio, Marcelo Gattermann Perin and Clécio Falcão Araújo

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic framework with a meta-analytical approach to distinguish various types of antecedents and consequences of satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic framework with a meta-analytical approach to distinguish various types of antecedents and consequences of satisfaction in the banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted searches in 13 databases and analysed 811 relationships in 210 articles. For the quantitative data analysis, the authors used the coefficient of correlation r as a metric variable to measure the effect size of the studied scope variables.

Findings

The findings of this meta-analysis demonstrated ten dimensions that directly influence satisfaction in the banking sector: a bank’s atmosphere, special treatment and relational benefits, timesaving features, the dimensions and determinants of service quality, customers’ overall perceptions of service quality, end-user computing, service recovery, external factors, strategic orientation and behavioural outcomes. These ten dimensions were derived from 55 variables.

Research limitations/implications

This meta-analysis reviewed relationships found worldwide in the literature, expanding and improving the current knowledge. It identified ways that research on satisfaction in the banking sector is lacking and presents suggestions for the elaboration of new studies to allow future researchers to better define their agendas.

Practical implications

The results show that managers should care about satisfaction because it results from the consumer’s banking experience. The ten dimensions affect satisfaction to differing degrees.

Originality/value

This research tested the impact of the antecedents and consequences of satisfaction in the banking sector and presented important results through this meta-analytical review. This meta-analysis contributes to the marketing literature, with a set of empirical generalizations, including relationship coefficients and calculated fail-safe numbers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Timothy Tunde Oladokun and Bioye Tajudeen Aluko

This paper aims to evaluate the strategies adopted by Nigerian banks to integrate the management of their real estate assets into the overall business objectives.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the strategies adopted by Nigerian banks to integrate the management of their real estate assets into the overall business objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to the corporate real estate managers of the 24 recapitalised banks in the country and supplemented with interview. The study adopted the descriptive method of percentages, mean and proportion methods for analysis.

Findings

The study found that Nigerian banks have distinct real estate units that manage their substantial real estate holdings, which they revalue at the open market basis every six months. The study also found that in spite of the fact that Nigerian banks have substantial real estate holdings, employees of the real estate unit spend more time on the core business of the organisations than on real estate activities. While some of them have sole responsibility for real estate activities, others are gradually shifting attention to the importance of their real estate assets.

Practical implications

The study has major implications on corporate real estate management and banking practice in Nigeria. There is the need for organisations to re‐direct their focus towards the strategic perspective of CRE as an important and profit inducing tool of business. This may require exposing CRE executives to requisite training that will equip them for effective service delivery.

Social implications

Inefficient real estate management can result in huge loss of shareholders fund by investors and subsequently affect the economy.

Originality/value

The study identified real estate as a “turn around” tool that can be adopted by bank executives to improve their financial status and a pro active step towards building an efficient and virile profession to handle the emerging corporate real estate management sub discipline in real estate.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Zalfa Laili Hamzah, Siew Peng Lee and Sedigheh Moghavvemi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensions of service quality (SERVQUAL) from the perspective of the customers and its relationships with perceived overall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensions of service quality (SERVQUAL) from the perspective of the customers and its relationships with perceived overall SERVQUAL in retail banking and also investigate the relationships between perceived overall SERVQUAL and customer trust, customer satisfaction, and bank reputation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was constructed, and data were collected from 375 regular customers of local banks. The convenience sampling method was employed to collect data from existing customers of local banks operating in the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. Structural equation modelling was applied to analyse the data.

Findings

The results of the study indicate four key dimensions of SERVQUAL – tangibles, empathy, reliability and security, and internet banking – all of which are significantly and positively related to customers’ perceived overall SERVQUAL. Internet banking facilities are another significant determinant of the perceived overall SERVQUAL. The results are indicative of the strong and positive effect upon customer satisfaction, their trust in the bank, and, finally, a bank’s reputation.

Research limitations/implications

This study has presented and tested empirical study of perceived overall SERVQUAL model in the banking industry, particularly in the Malaysian context. This research identified the dimensions of SERVQUAL (i.e. tangibles, empathy, reliability and security, and internet banking) that influence the overall perceived SERVQUAL, and how these overall perceptions will eventually influence customer trust, customer satisfaction, and bank reputation is valid and reliable in retail banking industry. This study, however, only focussed on the banking industry. Given the diversity of the service industry, these findings may have to be tested for the applicability to different service industries in future studies.

Practical implications

This research is useful to bank managers as it helps them improve SERVQUAL to protect and expand their respective market share in a highly competitive industry. Banks could utilise the results of this study to improve their service tangibility, empathy, reliability, and security, which will affect both customer trust and satisfaction, and enhance a bank’s reputation.

Social implications

The findings of specific dimensions of SERVQUAL will contribute to customer perception of banks’ image and reputation, and strengthen trust and satisfaction. Moreover, assisting customers towards the understanding of how they should received high quality of services with regard to quality should be perceived as emphatic, reliable, secured and tangibility of service.

Originality/value

The findings of this study highlight the specific dimensionalities of SERVQUAL in influencing the perceived overall SERVQUAL. This study will increase the understanding on the impact of perceived overall SERVQUAL on consumer trust, customer satisfaction, and a bank’s reputation. Specifically, it reports an empirical study of a model of perceived overall SERVQUAL that simultaneously considers the direct effects of perceived overall SERVQUAL on customer trust, customer satisfaction and bank reputation.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Divine Tuinese Novieto and Gladstone Sena Kportufe

Work-family conflict (WFC), a common problem in all sectors of every economy, has always been linked to negative consequences for individuals, families and employment…

Abstract

Purpose

Work-family conflict (WFC), a common problem in all sectors of every economy, has always been linked to negative consequences for individuals, families and employment organisations. However, owing to contextual and situational differences coupled with inconsistent findings, more studies on WFC are indispensable to disentangle the consequential effects of WFC, especially amongst construction professionals. More so, little is known about the dual role of project management self-efficacy (PMSE) in the WFC-performance relation. Thus, the purpose of the present study is to examine the mediating-moderating effects of PMSE on the WFC-performance nexus amongst construction professionals in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study came from a cross-sectional survey (questionnaire) administered to 302 construction professionals in Ghana using convenience sampling technique. And partial least square-based structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was performed, which included the assessment of measurement and structural models.

Findings

The results of this study support the mediating–moderating model of WFC, in which PMSE simultaneously mediates and moderates the negative influence of WFC on project performance of construction professionals; thus, validating the dual role of PMSE through the lens of Hobfoll's (1989) conservation of resource theory.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a conveniently sampled construction professionals in Ghana. Thus, the sampling framework, including only the construction professionals in three regions of Ghana, does not ensure the full generalisation of the results.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide significant implication for construction organisations and practitioners. Construction organisations and practitioners seeking to mitigate the negative consequences of WFC on project performance should focus on building on PMSE of the construction professionals. Further, a responsive work environment is needed to cater for family needs of the construction professionals.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to have tested a model including the mediating-moderating effects of PMSE in the construction industry from a developing country perspective. The study, therefore, enriches the prevailing literature from under-represented context by examining the mediating-moderating effects of PMSE on WFC and project performance nexus that has not been previously investigated.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Sedigheh Moghavvemi, Su Teng Lee and Siew Peng Lee

Foreign and local banks in Malaysia are competing in terms of skilled staff, innovative products and services, rendering quality services and customer satisfaction. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Foreign and local banks in Malaysia are competing in terms of skilled staff, innovative products and services, rendering quality services and customer satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to examine the overall service quality and customer satisfaction of both foreign and local banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to test the hypothesis were collected from 748 foreign and local bank customers in Malaysia. The research model was analysed using a structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

Results show that knowledge and staff competencies, as well as convenience of the bank is more significant for local bank customers while bank image and internet banking are important components for foreign bank customers. The results also reveal that foreign bank customers have higher satisfaction as compared to local bank customers.

Research limitations/implications

No analysis is undertaken of any difference in the service quality dimensions between banks of different size. Further research on banking services could usefully test services quality dimensions across banks of different sizes.

Practical implications

The findings serve as a valuable reference for local banks understand service quality challenges they may face from foreign banks in this competitive industry. Findings suggest that, to provide high-quality services, financial institutions need to heighten customer satisfaction differentiation strategies.

Originality/value

The outcomes of this study enhance the knowledge on the performance of both local and foreign banks in Malaysia as well as customer satisfaction, which are invaluable to all bank managers and industry players in improving their services.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2015

P. W. Senarath Yapa and Sarath Ukwatte

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the reasons why Sri Lanka adopted International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) recently. Many less developed countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the reasons why Sri Lanka adopted International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) recently. Many less developed countries (LDCs) have introduced IPSAS during the recent past. However, little research has been conducted to study the New Public Financial Management and accrual accounting and their impact on LDCs.

Methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, the methods of this paper consist of interviews, a documentary review and participatory observation in the Ministry of Finance and Planning (MOFP) and Auditor General’s Department of Sri Lanka, and present a critical interpretation supported by the perspective of globalisation.

Findings

The findings of the research indicate that the public sector reforms and the transition from cash accounting to accrual accounting in the public sector have been strongly affected by the global pressures imposed by international agencies such as International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) and the World Bank (WB). Empirical evidence shows the dysfunctional impact of globalisation in the public sector accounting standards as there are major structural issues yet to resolve. There are increasing doubts over whether the change to accrual accounting is worth the costs and the additional risks involved.

Research limitations

The results of the interviews are based on the knowledge and past experiences of interviewees. What is generalisable is an understanding of the processes and mechanisms that relate to the way the public sector accounting functions.

Originality/value

This paper adds new literature on public sector accounting in LDCs, which recognises the nexus and interests of international agencies and practice of public sector accounting.

Details

The Public Sector Accounting, Accountability and Auditing in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-662-1

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Dushar Kamini Dayarathna, Peter John Dowling and Timothy Bartram

This paper aims to examine the implications of high performance work system (HPWS) strength from a managerial perspective and the impact of economic, cultural, political…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the implications of high performance work system (HPWS) strength from a managerial perspective and the impact of economic, cultural, political, legal and technological factors on the operationalization of HPWSs in the banking industry in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from three licensed commercial banks in Sri Lanka. This research used a case study approach for data collection with archival analysis of records and semi-structured interviews with the CEO, head of HR, two board members and three focus groups (top, middle and lower level managers across various functional areas) in each bank which altogether covers 66 key informants.

Findings

The findings supported the research proposition that to gain positive outcomes on organizational effectiveness, there should be a strong HPWS, resulting in a positive attitudinal climate among employees. Further, the findings provide evidence of the global applicability of HPWSs, although more research is needed to clearly specify the contextual boundaries of HPWS effectiveness.

Originality/value

Contemporary research provides ample evidence to endorse the contribution of high performance work systems toward organizational effectiveness. However, there is a dearth of literature on how high performance work systems are operationalized across the management hierarchy and support the achievement of organizational effectiveness. Few studies have been conducted on high performance work system strength and organizational effectiveness in emerging economies.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Padmi Nagirikandalage and Ben Binsardi

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the implementation of cost accounting systems (CAS) using content analysis. In particular, it aims to examine the impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the implementation of cost accounting systems (CAS) using content analysis. In particular, it aims to examine the impact of Sri Lankan cultural and local characteristics on the adoption of CAS. In particular, it examines the factors that facilitate or hinder the adoption of CAS in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data for the research were obtained by interviewing selected respondents from Sri Lanka’s manufacturing and service sectors. They were shortlisted using maximum variation sampling to obtain a representative cross-section of the national population. A total of 16 respondents were interviewed, which resulted in 57 interview paragraphs to be coded. Several theories were used to analyse them, namely, the theory of institutional isomorphism (homogeneity) and the theory of heterogeneity, as well as Clifford Geertz’s cultural theories.

Findings

A cross-comparison between the findings and relevant literature indicates the existence of complete institutional isomorphism and partial institutional heterogeneity in Sri Lanka. Heterogeneity exists in organisations such as foreign multinationals, which have adopted unique and sophisticated CAS. In addition, inadequate access to information and the orientation of the local culture has affected the implementation of CAS in Sri Lanka, with a lack of awareness of the importance of CAS, a sluggish approach to costing and cultural values forming prominent barriers to its implementation. These findings are plausible in light of the relationship between a sluggish approach towards costing (a low cost awareness), and local attitudes towards the implementation of more efficient accounting practices such as CAS.

Practical implications

This research is invaluable as a tool for Sri Lankan policymakers and practitioners, enabling the public and private sectors to provide education and training to enhance staff understanding and promote a positive attitude towards costing. With more efficient institutional CAS, the country’s economy will be more competitive internationally. As well as policymakers and practitioners, this research could be used by academicians for advancing theoretical development around the cultural triggers and barriers for adopting more innovative and fresher CAS in Sri Lanka.

Originality/value

The originality of this research can be justified on two counts. Firstly, although a wealth of research exists that examines the influence of culture on behaviour, this research specifically evaluates the impact of cultural factors on attitudes towards costing. These factors could be facilitators or obstructions for implementing CAS. Secondly, this research aims to combine both earlier and recent theories of institutionalism with Clifford Geertz’s cultural theory, to investigate how people and institutions in Sri Lanka adopt CAS. Earlier studies have focused merely on earlier theories of institutional homogeneity.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 32 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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