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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Karthik Selvanayagam and Varisha Rehman

This paper aims to, first, analyze the transformation of the Indian market by extending Sreekumar and Varman’s (2016) work on history of marketing in India into the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to, first, analyze the transformation of the Indian market by extending Sreekumar and Varman’s (2016) work on history of marketing in India into the post-colonial era; second, trace the emergence and adoption of various media technologies in the post-colonial Indian market; third, identify the evolving trends in marketing practices alongside the penetration of these media technologies in the market; and finally, argue the need for mindful adoption of marketing practices in the Indian market, rather than direct replication of Western practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical perspective on the post-colonial Indian market is done through extant literature review and analysis of marketing practices by iconic brands in the Indian market.

Findings

This research reveals that the adoption of Western marketing practices by brands in the Indian market has led to increasing materialistic consumption patterns among consumers. Furthermore, such practices in the social media technology era impose individualistic values in the Indian consumers, contrary to the cultural values of the country. Therefore, this research posits the need for mindful marketing practices to be adopted for the Indian market.

Social implications

This research shows warning signs of growing materialistic values among Indian consumers and the implications of marketing strategies on the society as a whole.

Originality/value

This study is a first of its kind in highlighting the transformation of the post-colonial Indian market by integrating actual marketing campaigns over this period with literature to present the various issues in the current state of the market.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Palash Deb and Vipin Sreekumar

The authors investigate whether firms in learning-intensive industries are more prone to bankruptcy and how this shapes a firm's financing choices.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors investigate whether firms in learning-intensive industries are more prone to bankruptcy and how this shapes a firm's financing choices.

Design/methodology/approach

Industry learning estimates based on US manufacturing firms are obtained from the study of Balasubramanian and Lieberman (2010; 2011), who collected these estimates from the US Census Bureau. Merging the learning estimates with data from Compustat gives us a final sample of 6,138 publicly-traded US manufacturing firms (56,930 firm-years) between 1973 and 2000. The authors use both OLS and IV estimation approaches to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings confirm that firms operating in learning-intensive industries have a higher threat of bankruptcy. The authors also find that a debt-intensive capital structure exacerbates the threat of bankruptcy; therefore, firms in such industries have a significantly lower reliance on debt financing.

Practical implications

In the current turbulent business environment, managers operating in learning-intensive industries need to be more careful while making financing choices between debt and equity, and they can explore sources of financing that go beyond the capital markets.

Originality/value

No study so far has examined how industry learning intensity, a key industry characteristic, makes firms more prone to bankruptcy, and how this threat of bankruptcy results in more conservative financing choices. By integrating the theoretical perspectives from the structure–conduct–performance (SCP), transaction cost economics (TCE) and threat rigidity paradigms, this paper contributes to the literature by adding the industry learning environment as a novel determinant of firm financing choices and the threat of bankruptcy.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Rajkumar Gothandaraman and Sreekumar Muthuswamy

This paper aims to propose a system to acquire images automatically for digital reconstruction of heritage artifacts using a six-degree of freedom industrial manipulator.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a system to acquire images automatically for digital reconstruction of heritage artifacts using a six-degree of freedom industrial manipulator.

Design/methodology/approach

A virtual environment is created using Robot Studio® software to integrate the trajectory and differential motion of the robot manipulator and the motion of camera while acquiring images. A new area similarity matrix method is proposed to reduce the number of images required for digital reconstruction using Autodesk Recap® software. Real-time experiments have been performed using objects such as minion, ultimaker robot and cube. Evaluation of the digital reconstruction is conducted using the contour area matching method.

Findings

The number of images required for reconstruction based on area similarity matrix method is reduced to 63 per cent when compared with the random selection method. Quality parameters such as surface area, volume, number of defect holes, vertices and faces are enhanced for the proposed method.

Research limitations/implications

Digital reconstruction of large-sized heritage artifacts cannot be performed in this setup. But this can be overcome by fixing the manipulator on a mobile platform or overhead crane. This paper does not discuss the reconstruction of partially damaged heritage artifacts, which could be accomplished based on deep learning techniques.

Practical implications

Using this approach, off-the-shelf heritage artifacts and large-scale objects can be reconstructed digitally with a minimum number of images and without compromising the quality of original models.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, area similarity-based approach in 3D digital reconstruction by coupling the kinematics of an industrial manipulator and camera is proposed for the first time. A fully automated digital reconstruction technology to preserve valuable heritage artifacts has been developed. It also highlights the space constraints of the industrial manipulator in digital reconstruction.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2019

Madhubalan Viswanathan and Arun Sreekumar

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on consumers and technology in a changing world using insights gained from subsistence marketplaces. Consumers in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on consumers and technology in a changing world using insights gained from subsistence marketplaces. Consumers in a changing world are on different parts of the economic spectrum and are also reflected in contexts of poverty that is termed subsistence marketplaces. “Data” comes from pioneering the subsistence marketplaces stream of research, education and social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study the intersection of poverty and marketplaces, beginning at the micro-level, and take a bottom-up approach to deriving implications.

Findings

The authors cover both aspects – what micro-level insights about thinking, feeling and coping mean for technology perceptions and usage in general and what specific insights are derived for designing and implementing solutions that have bearing on the use of technology. In the course of all endeavors in research, education and social enterprise, technology, particularly information and communications technology, has been central.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss implications for research at the confluence of a variety of uncertainties inherent in the context of subsistence marketplaces, in environmental issues and climate change and in the nature and speed of technological change and progress.

Practical implications

In this paper, the authors discuss what subsistence marketplaces mean for consumers and technology in a changing world, lessons learned for the design and development of technological solutions, technological innovation from subsistence marketplaces and a broader discussion of the importance of bottom-up approaches to the intersection of subsistence marketplaces and technological solutions.

Originality/value

The authors use insights developed from pioneering the arena of subsistence marketplaces and creating synergies between research, education and social enterprise.

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Stacy Buckingham-Howes, Poorna Sreekumar, Glenn Morris and Lynn M. Grattan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which self-reported resilience was associated with mental health outcomes four years after the Deepwater Horizon oil…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which self-reported resilience was associated with mental health outcomes four years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWHOS).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 179 men and women randomly selected from two Northeast Gulf Coast communities as part of a larger, prospective study of behavioral health post oil spill. The majority of the participants were Caucasian (70.8 percent), female (61.5 percent), had a high school education or lower (75.3 percent), and ranged in age from 18 to greater than 60 years old. Participants completed a measure of resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, CD-RISC) 2.5 years post oil spill and measures of overall mood disturbance (Profile of Mood States), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale) 4.5 years post oil spill.

Findings

Based upon linear regression analyses, elevated self-reported resilience significantly predicted lower scores on mood disturbance (b=−0.63, p<0.01) and depressive symptoms (b=−0.14, p<0.05) and higher scores on psychological (b=0.08, p<0.01) and overall health quality of life (b=0.08, p<0.01). Factor analysis of the CD-RISC identified three factors (hardiness, adaptability, optimism). Each factor predicted some, but not all, of the outcomes with optimism being the least predictive of mental health.

Originality/value

Self-reported resilience two years after the DWHOS was a useful predictor of mental health outcome four years post-spill. Early assessment may facilitate the identification of individuals at risk of longer-term mental health problems for public health prevention or mental health intervention efforts.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Hari Sreekumar

The purpose of this paper is to review the key literature pertaining to consumption during the colonial period in India, broadly covering the time period from the early…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the key literature pertaining to consumption during the colonial period in India, broadly covering the time period from the early nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. The review shows the prominent themes and patterns that help us understand colonial Indian consumers’ encounter with Western products and institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a review of historical research papers and papers pertaining to the colonial period in India.

Findings

British colonialism introduced new products, institutions and ways of living into India, which were negotiated with and contested by Indian consumers and intellectuals. These new products and practices were not seamlessly adopted into the Indian context. Rather, they were appropriated into existing social structures determined by caste, gender and religion. The tensions produced by such negotiations and contestations fed Indian resistance to colonialism, culminating in British withdrawal from India.

Originality/value

Historical research pertaining to marketing in the Indian context is scarce. Moreover, there are few reviews which outline the important consumption practices and changes pertaining to the colonial period. The findings of this review will be of use to researchers and students of history, marketing and cultural studies.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

S. Sreekumar and S.S. Mahapatra

The main purpose of the present study is to develop an integrated approach combining data envelopment analysis (DEA) and neural network (NN) for assessment and prediction…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the present study is to develop an integrated approach combining data envelopment analysis (DEA) and neural network (NN) for assessment and prediction of performance of Indian B‐schools for effective decision making as error and biasness due to human intervention in decision making is appreciably reduced.

Design/methodology/approach

DEA, being a robust mathematical tool, has been employed to evaluate the efficiency of B‐schools. DEA, basically, takes into account the input and output components of a decision‐making unit (DMU) to calculate technical efficiency (TE). TE is treated as an indicator for performance of DMUs and comparison has been made among them. A sensitivity analysis has been carried out to study robustness of the ranking of schools obtained through DEA. Finally, NN is used to predict the efficiency when changes in inputs are caused due to market dynamism so that effective strategies can be evolved by the managers with limited available data.

Findings

A total of 49 Indian B‐schools are chosen for benchmarking purpose. The average score of efficiency is 0.625 with a standard deviation of 0.175 when Charnes, Cooper and Rhodes (CCR) model is used. Similarly, when the Banker, Charnes and Cooper (BCC) model is used the average score is 0.888 with a standard deviation of 0.063. The rank order correlation coefficient between the efficiency ranking obtained through CCR and BCC model is 0.736 (p=0.000) which is significant. The peer group and peer weights for the inefficient B‐schools have been identified. This is useful for benchmarking for the inefficient DMUs. They can identify the parameters in which they lack and take necessary steps for improvement. The peer group for the inefficient B‐schools indicates the efficient B‐schools to which the inefficient B‐schools are closer in its combination of inputs and outputs. The TE obtained through DEA is used as output variable along with input variables considered in DEA as input and output parameters in a generalized regression NN during training phase. It can be observed that root mean square error is 0.009344 and 0.02323 for CCR‐ and BCC‐efficiency prediction, respectively, during training. Similarly, root mean square error is 0.08585 and 0.03279 for CCR‐ and BCC‐efficiency prediction, respectively, during testing. Now, individual schools can generate scenario with the data within their control and test their own performance through NN model.

Originality/value

This work proposes integration of DEA and NN to assist the managers to predict the performance of an individual DMU based on input consumed and generate various “what‐if” scenarios. The study provides a simple but comprehensive methodology for improving performance of B‐schools in India.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Marcus Wilcox Hemais

Based on a decolonial perspective from Latin America, this paper aims to offer a different history of the creation of Brazil’s Consumer Defense Code (CDC), analyzing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a decolonial perspective from Latin America, this paper aims to offer a different history of the creation of Brazil’s Consumer Defense Code (CDC), analyzing the process through which Eurocentric influences, especially coming from Consumers International (CI), became present in the development of the code.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative historical research was developed using marketing amnesia and decolonialism as its theoretical backdrop. Primary and secondary data are used as source of information. Primary data were obtained through interviews with two authors of the CDC. Secondary data were collected from academic articles and books, reports, magazines and consumer organization websites, as well as journalistic articles.

Findings

During the drafting of the CDC and after its promulgation, the presence of Eurocentric forces was constant, given the interests of CI and other agents in influencing Brazil’s consumer practices, subordinating them to those of the Global North. This Eurocentric presence was accepted by the Brazilian jurists that drafted the CDC, which led to the incorporation of both laws and bills from Eurocentric countries and the United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection into the code.

Originality/value

Such discussions are scarce in marketing, due to the area’s amnestic state regarding the past. While selectively forgetting certain pasts, marketing fails to both acknowledge its tendency to subordinate consumerist actions to those accepted by the Eurocentric world, and to establish analyses that deal with mimetic processes, to minimize asymmetries between companies and consumers, especially in emerging economies, and, even more, dichotomies between the Global North and the Global South.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

M. Sreekumar, T. Nagarajan, M. Singaperumal, M. Zoppi and R. Molfino

The purpose of this paper is to review the current application areas of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in intelligent robotic systems and devices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the current application areas of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in intelligent robotic systems and devices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses how actuation and sensing functions of the SMA actuator have been exploited and incorporated in micro and macro robotic devices, developed for medical and non‐medical applications. The speed of response of SMA actuator mostly depends upon its shape and size, addition and removal of heat and the bias force applied. All these factors have impact on the overall size of the robotic device and the degree of freedom (dof) obtained and hence, a comprehensive survey is made highlighting these aspects. Also described are the mechatronic aspects like the software and hardware used in an industrial environment for the control of such nonlinear actuator and the type of sensory feedback devices incorporated for obtaining better control, positioning accuracy and fast response.

Findings

SMA actuators find wide applications in various facets of robotic equipments. Selecting a suitable shape, fast heating and cooling method and better intelligent control technique with or without feedback devices could optimize its performance.

Research limitations/implications

The frequency of SMA actuation purely depends on the rate of heat energy added to and removed from the actuator, which in turn depends upon interrelated nonlinear parameters.

Practical implications

For increasing the dof of robots, number of actuators also have to be increased that leads to complex control problems.

Originality/value

Explains the suitability of SMA as actuators in smart robotic systems, possibility of miniaturisation. It also highlights the difficulties faced by the SMA research community.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Priyanka Katiyar, T V Sreekumar, Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay, Anurag Srivastava and K U Bhasker Rao

Textile fibers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) show significant improvement in mechanical properties. Being lightweight and stronger than ordinary textile grade…

Abstract

Textile fibers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) show significant improvement in mechanical properties. Being lightweight and stronger than ordinary textile grade fibers, they can be used for different reinforcement applications. This paper reports a study on the comparison of the mechanical properties of composite fibers made of polypropylene (PP) and CNT obtained from different sources. A single walled nanotube from Carbolex USA, mutiwalled nanotubes from Iljin, Korea and DMSRDE Kanpur are used for the study. The composite fibers are made in two varieties viz. 0.5wt% and 1wt% concentration of CNT. It is observed that the mechanical properties, such as tenacity and modulus, increased with increased concentrations of the CNT irrespective of the brand and nature of the synthesis. The composite fibers made of multi walled CNT produced by DMSRDE give the best results in terms of spinnability and mechanical properties. The tenacity of the DMSRDE fibers is as high as ∼9gpd and modulus as high as 114gpd.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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