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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Nilsah Cavdar Aksoy, Alev Kocak Alan, Ebru Tumer Kabadayi and Alican Aksoy

This study aims to examine the wearable devices market as an essential representative of the digital age using a framework based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the wearable devices market as an essential representative of the digital age using a framework based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and the context of sports wearables.

Design/methodology/approach

411 people, are both users and non-users of this technology were surveyed online, and the obtained data analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results support the effects of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating conditions, and social influence on attitude toward sports wearables and attitude of usage intention. Further, technophobia moderates the relationship between performance expectancy and attitude. However, a moderating effect of technophobia on the relationship between effort expectancy and attitude was not observed.

Originality/value

Due to innovative technologies in the digital age we live in, the devices we use in everyday life have gained intelligence. As more developments take place, and related products enter the market, understanding how people react to these products becomes an important issue. While investigating this issue in the context of sports wearables in this study, an important psychological construct, technophobia, was included in the research model in order to explore the usage intention of individuals through the effects of psychological constructs, such as paranoia, fear, anxiety, cybernetic revolt and cellphone avoidance, and the strong combination of important constructs of phobia to go against technology.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Taejung Kim, Weisheng Chiu and Marcus Kin Fung Chow

The development of wearable technology has significantly changed the way people participate in physical activities. The purpose of this paper is to segment users of sports

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Abstract

Purpose

The development of wearable technology has significantly changed the way people participate in physical activities. The purpose of this paper is to segment users of sports wearable devices based on technology readiness (TR).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants comprised a convenience sample of 356 participants using sports wearable devices in South Korea. Cluster analysis was performed to identify clusters of sports wearable users based on their TR (i.e. motivating and inhibiting beliefs regarding technologies). Analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey’s test were used to determine whether there were significant differences among the clusters.

Findings

Clustering identified three groups of users of sports wearable devices: Explorers (high motivation, low inhibition), Laggards (low motivation, high inhibition) and Pioneers (high motivation, high inhibition). Each group demonstrated significant differences in TR (i.e. optimism, innovativeness, discomfort and insecurity). It also found that Laggards are more likely to be female and older users (i.e. over 40 years old).

Originality/value

This study explores characteristics of possible market segments and provides a better understanding of user profiles of sports wearable devices. These findings provide insightful implications for marketers of sports wearable devices, who can tailor marketing strategies to each segment. Designers of sports wearable devices can benefit from the user profiles and develop more appropriate products for users.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2018

Taejung Kim and Weisheng Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers’ acceptance and use of sports and fitness wearable devices based on technology readiness (TR). In addition, the…

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1510

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers’ acceptance and use of sports and fitness wearable devices based on technology readiness (TR). In addition, the technology readiness and acceptance model (TRAM) will be used to investigate consumers’ intention to use sports wearable devices (for simplicity, sports wearable devices will be simplified to the term “sports wearables”).

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling was conducted from Korean consumers (n=247). Data were analyzed by partial least squares–structural equation modeling using SmartPLS 3.0.

Findings

The results found that positive TR has a positive influence on perceived ease of use (PEOU) and perceived usefulness (PU), and negative TR had a negative influence on PEOU and PU. PEOU had a positive influence on perceived usefulness (PU). Both PEOU and PU led to intention to use sports wearable devices. Also, the multi-group analysis found a positive correlation between TR and PEOU for especially male users.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide a better understanding of consumers’ behavioral intent to use sports wearables. Particularly, it also provides evidence that the TRAM is an appropriate framework for predicting users’ intention to use sports wearables. This study also stresses the important role of TR in consumers’ psychological processes leading up to the actual use of novel sports wearables.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Ana Isabel Polo-Peña, Dolores María Frías-Jamilena and María Lina Fernández-Ruano

In advanced societies, lifestyles are increasingly sedentary, and it is important to identify strategies to help people acquire healthy habits, such as exercise. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In advanced societies, lifestyles are increasingly sedentary, and it is important to identify strategies to help people acquire healthy habits, such as exercise. The present study proposes the use of gamification as a strategy for encouraging users to exercise regularly, based on the possibilities offered by “smart” devices such as smartbands.

Design/methodology/approach

The work analyzes how individuals experience their participation in a gamification program, on the premise that it should provide an experience that is intrinsically motivating and fun. Also the moderator effect of the gender and age on the relationship between their experience of participating in a gamification program and perceived self-efficacy.

Findings

The results show that individuals' experience of participating in a gamification program exerts a positive influence on their perceived self-efficacy in the practice of sport or exercise. The study also finds that the variables “gender” and “age” moderate the relationship between their experience of participating in a gamification program and perceived self-efficacy, such that it exerts a greater influence on women and older people.

Practical implications

The practical implications for the professionals and institutions involved in promoting the adoption of regular sport and exercise in society are about taking advantage of the potential of wearable technology such as smartbands. The present study finds that the use of gamification for encouraging people to adopt regular physical activity is more effective for women than for men, and for older people than for younger users.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide a better understanding of whether gamification is an appropriate strategy for helping participants to perceive themselves as having greater self-efficacy in their chosen sport or exercise, taking into account the moderating effect of participant gender and age.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Ho Yeol Yu, G. Matthew Robinson and DongHun Lee

This study was conducted to examine the effect of co-branding, a brand partnership tactic involving two or more brands, on consumer behavior within the sport industry. As…

Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to examine the effect of co-branding, a brand partnership tactic involving two or more brands, on consumer behavior within the sport industry. As such, the primary aim was to examine differences regarding consumers' perceptions of self-image congruence and perceived product quality when considering solo-branding and co-branding conditions. Further, under the co-branding condition, relationships among consumers' self-image congruence, perceived product quality, image fit, product evaluation and purchase intention were investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based quasi-experiment consisting of hypothetical co-branding initiatives between existing brands was conducted.

Findings

Results from a repeated multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated that consumers' symbolic and functional perceptions of co-branding as well as evaluations were statistically higher than in the solo-branding condition. Additionally, structural equation modeling indicated positive relationships between consumers' symbolic and functional perceptions, image fit, evaluation and behavior intention.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first papers to investigate the impact of co-branding on consumers within the sport industry and provides evidence of the positive impact of co-branding strategies on consumer behavior within the sport industry.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Ching-Hung Chang, Leigh Robinson, Shih-Tung Shu and Shang-Chun Ma

Customers’ innovativeness regarding services and products affects their purchase behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderation effect of fitness…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers’ innovativeness regarding services and products affects their purchase behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderation effect of fitness innovativeness (FI) (domain-specific innovativeness) and duration of stay on fitness customers’ revisit frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study. The purposive sampling survey method was used to obtain samples from the Taipei Nangang Fitness Center. Data were analyzed by moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The empirical results from 192 valid questionnaires that were obtained for data analysis revealed that FI has a positive impact on revisit frequency, and this impact is further increased if an individual is inclined to exercise and to stay longer at the fitness center.

Originality/value

A matrix of fitness innovator segments was developed to illustrate the research and managerial implications.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Man Lai Cheung, Wilson K.S. Leung and Haksin Chan

Young consumers have increasingly adopted wearable health-care technology to improve their well-being. Drawing on generation cohort theory (GCT) and the technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Young consumers have increasingly adopted wearable health-care technology to improve their well-being. Drawing on generation cohort theory (GCT) and the technology acceptance model (TAM), this study aims to illuminate the major factors that drive the adoption of health-care wearable technology products by Generation Z (Gen-Z) consumers in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administrated online survey was used to collect data from a sample of Gen-Z consumers in Hong Kong with experience in using health-care wearable technology. Data analysis was performed using partial least-squares-structural equation modeling to verify four hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that consumer innovativeness (CI) and electronic word-of-mouth referral (EWOM) are significant predictors of perceived credibility, perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness, which subsequently drive online engagement intention and adoption intention (AI).

Practical implications

This research provides practical guidance for marketers of health-care wearable technology products. In particular, CI and EWOM hold the key to young consumers’ product perceptions (and thereby their online engagement and AIs).

Originality/value

This research leverages the insights of GCT to enrich the TAM, specifically by including CI and EWOM as antecedents and online engagement as a consequence in the context of health-care wearable technology. The results of an empirical study enhance theoretical understanding of Gen-Z consumers’ perceptions and behavioral intentions toward health-care wearable technology. They also point to actionable recommendations for marketing this new technology to young consumers.

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Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2009

Sean T. Doherty

Health scientists and urban planners have long been interested in the influence that the built environment has on the physical activities in which we engage, the…

Abstract

Health scientists and urban planners have long been interested in the influence that the built environment has on the physical activities in which we engage, the environmental hazards we face, the kinds of amenities we enjoy, and the resulting impacts on our health. However, it is widely recognized that the extent of this influence, and the specific cause-and-effect relationships that exist, are still relatively unclear. Recent reviews highlight the need for more individual-level data on daily activities (especially physical activity) over long periods of time linked spatially to real-world characteristics of the built environment in diverse settings, along with a wide range of personal mediating variables. While capturing objective data on the built environment has benefited from wide-scale availability of detailed land use and transport network databases, the same cannot be said of human activity. A more diverse history of data collection methods exists for such activity and continues to evolve owing to a variety of quickly emerging wearable sensor technologies. At present, no “gold standard” method has emerged for assessing physical activity type and intensity under the real-world conditions of the built environment; in fact, most methods have barely been tested outside of the laboratory, and those that have tend to experience significant drops in accuracy and reliability. This paper provides a review of these diverse methods and emerging technologies, including biochemical, self-report, direct observation, passive motion detection, and integrated approaches. Based on this review and current needs, an integrated three-tiered methodology is proposed, including: (1) passive location tracking (e.g., using global positioning systems); (2) passive motion/biometric tracking (e.g., using accelerometers); and (3) limited self-reporting (e.g., using prompted recall diaries). Key development issues are highlighted, including the need for proper validation and automated activity-detection algorithms. The paper ends with a look at some of the key lessons learned and new opportunities that have emerged at the crossroads of urban studies and health sciences.

We do have a vision for a world in which people can walk to shops, school, friends' homes, or transit stations; in which they can mingle with their neighbors and admire trees, plants, and waterways; in which the air and water are clean; and in which there are parks and play areas for children, gathering spots for teens and the elderly, and convenient work and recreation places for the rest of us. (Frumkin, Frank, & Jackson, 2004, p. xvii)

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84-855844-1

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Paul Pounder

The purpose of this paper is to examine the existing literature in entrepreneurship and innovation and its linkages to sport.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the existing literature in entrepreneurship and innovation and its linkages to sport.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved four main stages: definition of the key aspects of innovation and entrepreneurship; synthesis of the typologies purporting the interplay between entrepreneurship and innovation in sport; showcasing entrepreneurship and innovation in-practice in a sports context; and identifying steps toward the development of an overall sports policy framework.

Findings

It was observed that through entrepreneurship, innovation plays a crucial role in contributing to the sports industry through research, and technology adaptation. The wide variation in the adaptation techniques of innovation in the entrepreneurship realm for sports can be supported by three aspects: a strong culture of innovation, the adaptation of technology from other sectors for sports entrepreneurship and network support.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the critical role that entrepreneurship and innovation can have on the sports sector. Those in the sports’ field can use this research to continue to push the development of products and services that can improve the field.

Originality/value

There is little emphasis on sports in mainstream entrepreneurship or innovation research. Therefore, this research is one of the few in this area to look at the interconnectivity between entrepreneurship, innovation and sports.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Tim Ströbel, Maximilian Stieler and Pascal Stegmann

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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