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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Radhika Murti and Spike Boydell

The purpose of this paper is to provide background information on the land tenure and conflict issues surrounding sustainable forestry management initiatives on customary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide background information on the land tenure and conflict issues surrounding sustainable forestry management initiatives on customary land in Fiji.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation of literature on land tenure, forestry and related conflict is augmented by two short case studies of sustainable forest management initiatives and the challenges in their execution attributable to customary land issues.

Findings

Conflicts occur within resource owning communities, between communities and external parties and among external parties. Often conflicts are based on confusion over property rights related issues. Conflicts stemming from differing views on ownership, tenure and property rights within forest management in Fiji, have led to delayed implementation of critical environmental management plans, loss of economic benefits and disintegration within landowning (mataqali) units.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the importance of actively addressing conflicts in community based natural resource management initiatives in order for Fiji to reap the full benefits of community forestry.

Practical implications

The paper provides a useful general review for both researchers and forestry practitioners.

Originality/value

By providing a general overview of sustainable forest management in Fiji, the paper provides essential background for the subsequent testing of conflict management tools and conflict transformation strategies within a customary context.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Spike Boydell and Stuart Gronow

The Australian Institute of Valuers and Land Economists Incorporated introduced a mandatory discounted cash flow practice standard on 1 September 1996. Reviews the new…

Abstract

The Australian Institute of Valuers and Land Economists Incorporated introduced a mandatory discounted cash flow practice standard on 1 September 1996. Reviews the new standard, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses. Offers early constructive commentary for the refinement of the standard at its 12‐month review. As no such mandatory “practice standard” has yet emerged from the US Appraisal Institute or the UK Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, it is reasonable to assume that these bodies as well as their membership will view the Australian initiative with interest.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Beverly Pasian, Shankar Sankaran and Spike Boydell

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a doctoral thesis examining the limitations of project management maturity and associated models. It examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a doctoral thesis examining the limitations of project management maturity and associated models. It examines the management of undefined projects where the definition, repeatability and predictability of processes cannot be reasonably expected. The challenge to project management maturity theorists is to recognize the possibility of project management maturity in an environment characterized by undefined project elements and the requirement for greater flexibility in their management.

Design/methodology/approach

This inquiry was supported by a multimethod (MXM) research design with two stages: a content/textual analysis of two different collections of maturity models, and an exploratory case study of two university sites. The analysis (supported by grounded theory techniques) contributed to the development of a 4‐node conceptual framework that was used as the primary data collection instrument at two Canadian university sites.

Findings

Results indicate that multiple non‐process factors can contribute to a mature project management capability. These can include context‐specific values, specialized bodies of knowledge (instructional design), customer involvement, third‐party influence, and tacit “human factors” such as trust and creativity. The demands of this inquiry also demonstrated the need for a new data collection sequence in multimethod research design theory.

Practical implications

Practitioners are encouraged to consider customer involvement, organizational dynamics and adaptable variables such as leadership (among other non‐process factors) in their assessment of the maturity of their project management capability, and designers of future models could explore a multi‐dimensional approach that includes context‐specific factors to assessing and defining project management maturity.

Originality/value

This research expands the conceptual view and practical assessment of project management maturity; offers new analysis of the current generation of project management maturity models; documents e‐Learning project management; and defines a new data collection sequencing model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Content available

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Derek H.T. Walker

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Alex Brayson

The experimental parliamentary subsidy on knights' fees and freehold incomes from lands and rents of 1431 was the only English direct lay tax of the Middle Ages which…

Abstract

The experimental parliamentary subsidy on knights' fees and freehold incomes from lands and rents of 1431 was the only English direct lay tax of the Middle Ages which broke down. As such, this subsidy has a clear historiographical significance, yet previous scholars have tended to overlook it on the grounds that parliament's annulment act of 1432 mandated the destruction of all fiscal administrative evidence. Many county assessments from 1431–1432 do, however, survive and are examined for the first time in this article as part of a detailed assessment of the fiscal and administrative context of the knights' fees and incomes tax. This impost constituted a royal response to excess expenditures associated with Henry VI's “Coronation Expedition” of 1429–1431, the scale of which marked a decisive break from the fiscal-military strategy of the 1420s. Widespread confusion regarding whether taxpayers ought to pay the feudal or the non-feudal component of the 1431 subsidy characterized its botched administration. Industrial scale under-assessment, moreover, emerged as a serious problem. Officials' attempts to provide a measure of fiscal compensation by unlawfully double-assessing many taxpayers served to increase administrative confusion and resulted in parliament's annulment act of 1432. This had serious consequences for the crown's finances, since the regime was saddled with budgetary and debt problems which would ultimately undermine the solvency of the Lancastrian state.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-880-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

John A. Bratton

Explores worker flexibility, through learning, union strategies, and resistance to learning. Issues of flexibility, learning, and quality are subject of much debate…

Abstract

Explores worker flexibility, through learning, union strategies, and resistance to learning. Issues of flexibility, learning, and quality are subject of much debate, negotiation, and conflict in the Canadian pulp and paper industry. A key bargaining issue for management has been to harness flexibility among the manual craft workers, to improve labour productivity. Within this context, workplace learning is not neutral or independent of day‐to‐day union‐management relations: it is a contested issue. Learning new skills is viewed as a threat to job control and security and presents a paradox: learning new trade skills enhances individual workers’ flexibility and employability but collectively weakens the union through job losses. Data were collected from pulp mills in British Columbia between 1996 and 1999. Survey and qualitative data provides evidence that workers’ resistance to learning is part of the contested arena of productivity and job control.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Robert Smith

The contemporary rustler is a shrewd businessman, or rogue farmer exploiting food supply chain anomalies. Indeed, the first conviction in the UK for 20 years was a farmer…

Abstract

Purpose

The contemporary rustler is a shrewd businessman, or rogue farmer exploiting food supply chain anomalies. Indeed, the first conviction in the UK for 20 years was a farmer stealing from neighbouring farmers. The theft of sheep in the UK is an expanding criminal enterprise which remains under researched. The purpose of this paper is to examine what is known of the illegal trade and its links to food fraud from a supply chain perspective with an emphasis on food integrity issues.

Design/methodology/approach

There is a dearth of current viable literature on livestock theft in a western context making it necessary to turn to socio-historical research and to official documents such as those published by the NFU and other insurance companies to build up a picture of this illegal practice. This is supplemented by documentary research of articles published in the UK press.

Findings

From this raw data a typology of rustlers is developed. The findings point to insider “supply chain” knowledge being a key facet in the theft of livestock. Other examples in the typology relate to urban thieves wrestling live sheep into a car and to industry insiders associated with the abattoir sector.

Research limitations/implications

The obvious limitations is that as yet there are few detected cases of rustling in the UK so the developing typology of rustlers is sketchy. Another limitation is that much of the evidence upon which the typology is developed is anecdotal.

Originality/value

The typology should prove helpful to academics, insurance companies, investigators, industry insiders and farmers to help them understand this contemporary crime and how to prevent its spread. It also sheds light on food integrity in relation to the purchase and consumption of the end product in that customers expect to be purchasing legally and ethically reared animal products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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