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Article

Becca B.R. Jablonski, Joleen Hadrich and Allie Bauman

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 directed the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Risk Management Association to investigate a policy targeted to farms…

Abstract

Purpose

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 directed the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Risk Management Association to investigate a policy targeted to farms and ranches that sell through local food markets. However, there is no available research that quantitatively documents the extent to which local food producers utilize Federal crop insurance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize 2013–2016 USDA Agricultural Resource Management Survey data to compare farms and ranches with sales through local food markets to those with and without Federal crop insurance expenditure, as well as the distribution of Federal crop expenditure, across market channels and scales.

Findings

There is a little variation in Federal crop insurance expenditure across market channels, defined as direct-to-consumer only sales, intermediated sales, and a combination of direct-to-consumer and intermediated sales. Rather, the results show that scale is the primary predictor of Federal crop insurance expenditure; larger operations are more likely to have nonzero Federal crop insurance expenses.

Originality/value

This article provides the first national research to document descriptive statistics of the utilization of Federal crop insurance by US farms and ranches that utilize local food market channels.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Article

Pride Anya Ebile, Hycenth Tim Ndah and Jens Norbert Wünsche

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score (DDS)of Mbororo minority women in the Northwest region of Cameroon.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the random sampling technique within the Mbororo minority communities (Adorates). A questionnaire on dietary diversity, including 461 Mbororo women, provided information on food consumed using the 24-h dietary recall method.

Findings

Various socio-cultural and economic characteristics of the Mbororo women affected the nutrient level of their diet. Moreover, starchy staples, vitamin-A rich vegetables and palm oil and milk and milk products were consumed by more than half of the Mbororo community. Family herd size showed a positive influence on the dietary habit of the Mbororo population. The mean DDS significantly increased (p = 0.001), as herd size increased from below 50 (3.9 ± 1.1) to above 100 (4.8 ± 1.2).

Practical implications

Most of the diet consumed by the Mbororo women were low in iron, making them susceptible to nutrition anemia. The diet of the Aku women was more deficient in micronutrients than their Jaafun counterpart. These results indicate suitable areas of intervention for any nutrition program that targets the Mbororo minority group of Northwest Cameron.

Social implications

DDS can be used in assessing and classifying the population in rural communities according to the deficiencies in micronutrients of their diet.

Originality/value

The use of DDS to assess the nutrient quality of diets is frequently used to evaluate the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies but has never been applied to Mbororo minority women.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

James W. Julian and Clark F. Seavert

The purpose of this paper is to present AgProfit™ as a tool for users to assess economic risks associated with adoption of new technologies or production practices in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present AgProfit™ as a tool for users to assess economic risks associated with adoption of new technologies or production practices in production agriculture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the AgProfit™ software program, its approach to capital investment analysis and demonstrates the program use by developing a scenario for analysis and discusses the process and results of the analysis.

Findings

AgProfit™ was developed to assist growers in understanding the risks associated with technology adoption. The example presented in this paper demonstrates the value of the software program as a decision‐making tool on the complex question of how many acres are required for an economically beneficial adoption of a new technology. Thus, with this software program, a grower can base investment decisions on the net present value and internal rates of return on an investment rather than a sales pitch or “gut” feeling.

Originality/value

AgProfit™ is a recently developed software program that fills a void in available decision tools, providing users with the ability to assess the profitability and feasibility of production investment decisions.

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Article

Anoma Ariyawardana, Ramu Govindasamy and Venkata Puduri

The consumption of ethnic food is an integral part of the Hispanic culture. Therefore, this study was carried out with the intention of assessing the consumption and…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumption of ethnic food is an integral part of the Hispanic culture. Therefore, this study was carried out with the intention of assessing the consumption and preferences for ethnic specialty produce by the Hispanics in the east coast of the USA with an aim of formulating production and marketing guidelines to meet the increasing demands of the rising Hispanic population in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through telephone interviews from 542 randomly selected Mexicans and Puerto Ricans living in 16 east coast regions of the USA. Questions related to socio‐demographic details and consumption and preference for 20 pre‐determined ethnic specialty produce were asked. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression.

Findings

Chain grocery stores were the most common outlets for ethnic produce. Freshness and quality were the most important criteria for both Mexicans and Puerto Ricans. Expenditure patterns revealed that they allocate 71 percent and 62 percent respectively on ethnic produce compared with other produce. Age and education had a negative influence while income had a positive influence on the willingness‐to‐pay for ethnic specialty produce.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, only ten crops each were selected as ethnic specialty crops that are consumed by Mexicans and Puerto Ricans and the average willingness‐to‐pay for these crops were elicited.

Practical implications

Based on the expenditure patterns of 20 ethnic specialty produce commonly consumed and having a potential to be grown in the USA, this study recommends crops to be prioritized for production trials and grower recommendations.

Originality/value

The approach outlined in this paper uses a market‐driven assessment for crop prioritization research.

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Article

Michael Popp and Margot Rudstrom

A set of crop alternatives ranging from traditional, low risk to less common and/or high risk crops is ranked according to their impact on overall risk using two measures…

Abstract

A set of crop alternatives ranging from traditional, low risk to less common and/or high risk crops is ranked according to their impact on overall risk using two measures. These two measures would aid cropping decisions by providing (1) a priori guidance on overall risk impact, and (2) a means to reduce the need for complex E‐V frontier estimation. Results suggest the number of crops that may depend on the riskiness of crop alternatives form which a producer chooses. Some reductions in necessary calculations for E‐V analysis are therefore suggested.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article

William Wilson, Cole Gustafson and Bruce Dahl

Malting barley is an important specialty crop in the Northern Plains and growers mitigate risk with federally subsidized crop insurance and production contracts. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Malting barley is an important specialty crop in the Northern Plains and growers mitigate risk with federally subsidized crop insurance and production contracts. The purpose of this paper is to quantify risks growers face due to “coverage gaps” in crop insurance that result in uncertain indemnity payments when their crop does not meet contract specifications.

Design/methodology/approach

A stochastic dominance model is developed to evaluate alternative strategies for growers with differing risk attitudes and production practices (irrigation vs dryland).

Findings

The results illustrate how alternative crop insurance provisions affect efficient choice sets for growers. Risk premiums for irrigated growers all point to valuations favoring more coverage, contracts, and malting option B. As the crop insurance industry matures in the functions it performs, it will become increasingly more important to address quality attributes.

Originality/value

This paper addresses quality issues and coverage gaps in crop insurance provisions.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Case study

Srinivas Rao Pingali and Jyothi Rani Korem

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the management styles and motivations of SME founders; to understand how SMEs innovate with limited resources; to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the management styles and motivations of SME founders; to understand how SMEs innovate with limited resources; to develop and evaluate technology and platform options to solve operational and business model issues; to build a transforming strategy by leveraging technology; and to understand the agricultural industry and its significance to emerging economies.

Case overview/synopsis

The case is about a Small and Medium Enterprise in India that focussed on the agricultural sector. The company was owner operated and highly successful. As a result, the owner decided to maintain status quo till the COVID-19 crisis forced the company to relook at its strategy and innovate for the second time in its history.

Complexity academic level

MBA.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

R. Karina Gallardo and Michael P. Brady

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first: to define the profile of adopters of labor-enhancing technologies (e.g. platforms) identifying factors – such as operations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first: to define the profile of adopters of labor-enhancing technologies (e.g. platforms) identifying factors – such as operations size, mix of fruits grown, apple operation location, principal operators socio-demographics – and second: to estimate the efficiency threshold for platform adoption during apple harvesting to be financially feasible considering future increases in farm labor wages.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a mixed-mode survey in January-February 2010. Data were analyzed using a bivariate probit model, considering that the decision to adopt platforms was related with the orchard planting system. The authors conducted simulation scenarios to estimate the efficiencies – harvest – platforms must achieve in order to be economically feasible.

Findings

In total, 11 percent of the 316 apple operations covered by the survey used platforms. Orchard operations most likely to invest in planar structures are relatively large, produce high-value varieties, use organic systems, and have relatively young and educated operators. Similarly, operations producing high-value fruit such as “Honeycrisp” and controlled or patented varieties and relatively large operations are more likely to invest in platforms. The results of the comparison of the cost of harvesting apples using platforms vs ladders under several production assumptions indicate that platforms must increase labor productivity by at least 13 percent in order to be adopted by the industry.

Research limitations/implications

This study caveat is the lack of inclusion of production and marketing uncertainties in the estimation of future apple harvest costs. Further research to deeper analyze these issues is needed.

Practical implications

The authors present information on the profile of mechanization adopters, so extension educators and engineers could concentrate efforts on them to increase adoption levels. In addition the authors provide a threshold of efficiencies for harvest platforms associated with cost savings compared to manual harvest.

Social implications

Enabling the adoption of mechanization technologies by specialty crop industries would decrease the dependence on labor, decreasing labor uncertainties and facilitating the production of high quality produce to satisfy the needs of consumers. Second, it will end an era of importing poverty, given that the specialty crop industry has long benefited from seasonal migrant workers. It will improve rural American communities to shorten pools of farm workers, giving them access to permanent jobs with higher salaries.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is to improve understanding of the degree of mechanization, financial feasibility of current existing technologies, and barriers to greater mechanization by the Washington apple industry. Given the similar labor challenges faced, in general, by the US specialty crop agriculture, results could be applicable to the entire industry.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 75 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Case study

Fazal Jawad Seyyed, Moeen Naseer Butt, Osama Malik and Rafia Mazhar

The purposes of this study included: recognizing the risks and challenges farmers face when growing a new crop, understanding agricultural marketing and its processes and…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The purposes of this study included: recognizing the risks and challenges farmers face when growing a new crop, understanding agricultural marketing and its processes and developing a marketing strategy for a specialty agricultural product, such as quinoa.

Case overview/synopsis

The main focus of this case lies in identifying the risks faced by farmers in growing a new specialty crop and selecting the appropriate marketing strategies for targeting, positioning and channelling an agricultural product.

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in intermediate- to advanced-level marketing courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in universities. It can also be used in agriculture and agribusiness–based courses in the undergraduate, graduate or executive level.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Supplementary materials

Rehman, S.U., Selvaraj, M. and Ibrahim, M.S., 2012. Indian Agricultural Marketing-A Review. Asian Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development, 2(1), pp.69-75. Kotler, P., Keller, K.L., Ang, S.H., Tan, C.T. and Leong, S.M., 2018. Marketing Management: An Asian Perspective. Pearson.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Joleen C. Hadrich

– The purpose of this paper is to determine the sources and factors affecting farm revenue variation on crop and livestock farms in the Northern Great Plains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the sources and factors affecting farm revenue variation on crop and livestock farms in the Northern Great Plains.

Design/methodology/approach

A two method approach is used. Variance decomposition analysis is completed on an 18-year balanced panel data set of North Dakota producers to determine the sources of farm revenue variation. The second component of this research uses a random effects estimator to determine the effect of farm characteristics on farm revenue variation measured by coefficient of variation.

Findings

Crop revenue is the largest source of farm revenue variation, with crop insurance being the largest source of revenue variation diversification. Small market crops and corn were found to increase revenue variation compared to those operations that received the largest sum of their revenue from wheat. Government payments and insurance payments were also found to increase farm revenue variation indicating they may provide an incentive to plant more risky crops.

Originality/value

This analysis examined specific enterprises that affect farm revenue variation, which has not been examined in earlier work. This distinction allows for focus on potential policy implications of small market crops and new crops in “transitional planting zones”.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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