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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Jan Michael Nolin

The article aims to identify areas of potential research support that none of the traditional supportive actors (libraries, IT units, information units) have concerned themselves…

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Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to identify areas of potential research support that none of the traditional supportive actors (libraries, IT units, information units) have concerned themselves with, arguing for new tasks and roles for the academic library, specifically the special librarian.

Design/methodology/approach

Areas of “overload” in the digital practice of contemporary researchers are identified and then connected to various personalized digital tools. The article explores the idea that attention to new aspects of researchers information needs creates a potential for developing personalized meta-services at academic libraries.

Findings

It is possible to identify a wealth of new services that can, if put into practice, substantially redefine the relationship between academic librarians and researchers. This entails a turn from service aimed at novice users to sophisticated end-users. Such ideas also carry implications for LIS education programs and the need to build on special librarians who uphold competence in distinct knowledge domains. Two forms of domain-specific meta-services are explored: as support for collaboration and support for presentation.

Practical implications

It is suggested that academic libraries systematically utilize the “full cost” model of project funding in order to exhibit concrete benefits of personalized meta-services. The article holds implications for both academic libraries and for LIS educational institutions.

Originality/value

Personalized meta-services constitute a relatively fresh topic and have previously not been explored in connection with academic libraries.

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2023

Daniel Jr Soriano Balbin and Elizabeth Allan Lascano

The study aims to determine the extent of COVID-19’s impact on the libraries and information centers within Benguet. It identified the key differences in the effect of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to determine the extent of COVID-19’s impact on the libraries and information centers within Benguet. It identified the key differences in the effect of the pandemic on each type of library: public, special, school and academic. It recalled and documented the challenges faced by libraries and librarians. It determined which aspects of their library were affected and how they were modified in terms of their policies, personnel, physical space, services, collection, infodemic response and marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the qualitative descriptive method approach, specifically narrative research design and conducted online focus group discussions in which 14 librarians with managerial or supervisory functions participated. This method was used to explore the topic holistically by using qualitative inquiry. It best suited the purpose of fully understanding the experiences of libraries during the pandemic. The recorded online focus group discussions conducted through Zoom were reviewed and analyzed to identify key themes and responses from the participants. The themes identified from the thematic analysis were further validated with the participants through correspondence, chats or e-mails.

Findings

The findings showed that libraries were faced with challenges brought on by the lack of a written policy for the pandemic response, a lack of information communication and technology skills and resources, strict requirements on physical setup for pandemic compliance, budget cuts or realignments and delayed procurement, misinformation and users’ lack of awareness of the new services offered by the library.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on the pandemic experiences of libraries and information centers in Baguio-Benguet, which was hailed as a model for local pandemic response, through the lenses of librarians with supervisory roles or functions.

Practical implications

Libraries could reflect on their experiences in this pandemic to plan for future strategies that would be best implemented in situations where face-to-face services are not allowed.

Originality/value

This study presented various best practices from different library institutions that could be emulated in the future. Many of these are still relevant regardless library services are going back to normal.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Roland Wittwer

Libraries must balance traditional services with those evolving from new technologies. Those trying to understand how technological, social and economic issues affect the company…

1869

Abstract

Libraries must balance traditional services with those evolving from new technologies. Those trying to understand how technological, social and economic issues affect the company for which they work, should never forget their own goals. The small steps they take in shaping the services they deliver today will take their companies into the future. They should develop a clear view of the complex issues involved and equip themselves to meet these challenges. For librarians the challenge to adapt and continue developing professionally has never been greater. If librarians are going to lead this revolution, they may not only be competent at searching and finding information, but should also be fully computer‐literate and skilled in the use and application of these emerging technologies.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Mike Heery

States that academic libraries need to adapt to the changing profile of students in higher education. Indicates the differences between traditional and non‐traditional students…

3784

Abstract

States that academic libraries need to adapt to the changing profile of students in higher education. Indicates the differences between traditional and non‐traditional students and suggests strategies for dealing with the latter. Divides non‐traditional students into four categories: students with disabilities, overseas students, part‐time students and distance learners. Outlines the specific needs of each of these groups and suggests ways in which academic libraries can improve their services to them. Concludes by stating that it is essential for libraries and their staff to adapt to changing circumstances and points out the necessity of effective communication between lecturers and librarians.

Details

Library Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Yvette Jeal, Vincent de Paul Roper and Elaine Ansell

Reports on findings of a study of North‐West libraries and their service provision to the deaf and hard of hearing. Part 1 reports on current thoughts within the library…

1414

Abstract

Reports on findings of a study of North‐West libraries and their service provision to the deaf and hard of hearing. Part 1 reports on current thoughts within the library profession and developments in staff training, the improvement and promotion of stock, and user education. A second article will report on material and technological developments such as minicom and building adaptations. Throughout, a sensitivity to the range of needs within the deaf community is encouraged, as is the need to make service initiatives ‐ at least for the more traditional library services ‐ reliant not on the keenness of key staff but on policy decisions. Action is being taken ‐ staff in 88 per cent of public libraries and 17 per cent of academic libraries had undergone deaf awareness training, stocks of relevance to learning British Sign Language and about deaf culture are being acquired, and libraries are promoting subtitled and closed‐captioned videos.

Details

New Library World, vol. 97 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1970

AS Canadians themselves will quickly inform you, this is a big, young country—Great Britain would fit into a small part of Alberta, large stretches of which are still not…

Abstract

AS Canadians themselves will quickly inform you, this is a big, young country—Great Britain would fit into a small part of Alberta, large stretches of which are still not accurately recorded on large scale maps. Indeed, I listened to radio reports of a search for two aircraft on the first morning we were there. One aircraft (a helicopter) had been missing in the North Western Territories with a Calgary man aboard for two weeks and was eventually found crashed; the other, missing for two days, was a Cessna seaplane which had run out of fuel and punctured a float as it landed close to the shore of the Great Slave Lake. The occupants were rescued by air from this largely uncharted waste.

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Jacqueline Cropley

In times of frequent change, special libraries are facing constantfinancial scrutiny. To carry out budgeting effectively librarianstherefore need training in financial management…

Abstract

In times of frequent change, special libraries are facing constant financial scrutiny. To carry out budgeting effectively librarians therefore need training in financial management and good accounting skills. With help from the accounts department the librarian should investigate cost analysis and value assessment and pursue thorough effective constant revision of the budget, record‐keeping and data capture. Properly analysed information and clear presentation, to ensure senior management has a straightforward exposition of the facts, improve the chances of success.

Details

Library Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1956

J. BIRD

The free flow of information: Unesco's programme and methods. Unesco Chronicle, vol. 2, no. 3, March, 1956, pp. 80–85. [It is one of the aims written into the constitution of…

Abstract

The free flow of information: Unesco's programme and methods. Unesco Chronicle, vol. 2, no. 3, March, 1956, pp. 80–85. [It is one of the aims written into the constitution of Unesco that it shall strive to promote the free flow of information, and it has used various methods to bring this about. It has itself sponsored international agreements such as the Agreement on the Importation of Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Materials. Where full‐scale agreements are not possible it makes recommendations to members on desirable legislation, or sponsors administrative arrangements which do not have the binding force of agreements. It also works through its members to support suitable motions proposed by other bodies such as the International Telecommunications Union and the Universal Postal Union. It also publishes studies such as Trade barriers to knowledge which help to promote its plans. These methods have proved successful and it is proposed to continue them in the future.]

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1959

B. AGARD EVANS and G.B. GHOSH

In the United Kingdom the special library, in the modern connotation, developed in a world where public libraries were mature, well‐established and vigorous. In India, however…

Abstract

In the United Kingdom the special library, in the modern connotation, developed in a world where public libraries were mature, well‐established and vigorous. In India, however, the special library for the most part has preceded the development of the public library system.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2013

K. Megan Sheffield, Susan L. Silver and Lily Todorinova

The case study in this chapter describes the planning and implementation of a single service desk or “one desk” model, merging the circulation and reference desks at a large…

Abstract

The case study in this chapter describes the planning and implementation of a single service desk or “one desk” model, merging the circulation and reference desks at a large academic library. The transition to a single service desk model was proposed as a way to utilize library staff more efficiently and effectively. The project included a literature review, interviews with libraries that had recently moved to a one-desk model, and a recommendation that included a method as well as timeline for implementation. As a result of the recommendation, three committees were formed to lead the transition, each with representation from both the circulation and reference departments. One committee oversaw the physical implementation and assessment, while the second committee created training program for all staff teaching core competencies for both reference and circulation. The third committee recruited student peer research leaders as part of a pilot program for student assistants. Through the implementation process, the chairs of the three committees concluded that implementing a single service desk involved much more than just moving furniture and relocating equipment. Combining two departments with distinct organizational cultures was the key to making the transition successful. The details of the implementation can be used as a model for other libraries of any type contemplating a similar transition.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Operational View and Cases
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-054-3

Keywords

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