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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Wen Zheng, Senarath Dharmasena, Oral Capps Jr and Ramkumar Janakiraman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using nationally representative data from 62,092 households and tobit econometric procedure, conditional and unconditional factors affecting the demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water were estimated.

Findings

The own-price elasticity of demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water is −0.664 and −0.229, respectively. Coffee, fruit drinks, whole milk and tea are substitutes for non-sparking bottled water. Non-sparking bottled water, coffee, fruit drinks and whole milk are substitutes for sparking bottled water. Household income, race, region and presence of children significantly affect the demand for bottled water. A 10 percent increase in price due to a tax on bottled water decreased plastic use by 50 grams per household per year. This is equivalent to saving 9.5m pounds of plastic annually.

Research limitations/implications

Data used in this analysis only captured at-home consumption of bottled water by US households. While tax on bottled water may reduce the consumption of bottled water, it may increase the consumption of competitive beverages such as carbonated soft drinks or fruit drinks. Although the use of plastic with regards to water bottles may go down as a result of the tax, the plastic consumption could go up with regards to consumers’ increased purchase of other beverages. This might contribute net increase plastic bottle consumption, undermining the effects of a bottled water tax.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to look at demand and tax aspects with regards to disaggregated bottled water products.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Dilys Wells

Imported bottled waters have been commercially available in the UK since 1861 and long before that the famous spa towns like Bath, Harrogate and Leamington Spa were…

Abstract

Imported bottled waters have been commercially available in the UK since 1861 and long before that the famous spa towns like Bath, Harrogate and Leamington Spa were fashionable places to visit in order to recuperate, usually from food and drink excesses which were common among the wealthy people in those days. In spite of the unpleasant taste of many of these heavily mineralised waters, they were 'taken' in liberal quantities, probably in the belief that anything which tasted so horrid was bound to be good for one.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Case study
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Amonrat Thoumrungroje and Olimpia C. Racela

Corporate diversification, product portfolio analysis, industry structure, international business expansion, beverage industry.

Abstract

Subject area

Corporate diversification, product portfolio analysis, industry structure, international business expansion, beverage industry.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate MBA strategic management, international business strategy, and marketing strategy courses.

Case overview

Thai Beverage Public Company Limited (ThaiBev) was Thailand's largest beverage company and was among Asia's major alcoholic beverage companies. The case situation takes place during the latter part of August 2010, two years after the public announcement of ThaiBev's ambitious intentions to become a comprehensive and integrated beverage company and after having recently re-launched its acquired Wrangyer energy brand, a move signaling ThaiBev's strong commitment to its non-alcoholic beverages. The case describes the beverage industries at the global, regional, and country level and discusses ThaiBev's range of businesses. Marut Buranasetkul, Senior Vice President of Corporate Service and Deputy Managing Director of Thai Beverage Marketing, the sales and marketing arm of ThaiBev, must decide on the direction for ThaiBev to pursue to bring ThaiBev's non-alcoholic beverages to account for at least 10 percent of the company's total revenue. This case presents a number of important strategic topics, particularly in discussing industry structure and competition, as well as diversification issues encountered by a firm that was attempting to create a greater balance between the revenue contributions from its market leading dominant businesses and that of its younger and newer business lines.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will: understand the challenges faced by large conglomerates wanting to change their market position; learn to apply different frameworks such as Porter's Five Force Model, portfolio analysis, SWOT and to assess the competitive environment; learn to evaluate a company's current product portfolio and to recommend strategies to improve its allocation of resources; and learn to identify key success factors necessary to compete in a highly competitive industry.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Angela Fedi, Francesco La Barbera, Annabelle De Jong and Chiara Rollero

The market of bottled water is one of the largest in the world. Paradoxically, the consumption of water in plastic bottles is highest in countries rich in the potable tap…

Abstract

Purpose

The market of bottled water is one of the largest in the world. Paradoxically, the consumption of water in plastic bottles is highest in countries rich in the potable tap water of excellent quality. This paper aims to gain a better understanding of the factors that foster or hinder the intention to use refillable water bottles by university students and to determine whether their study program played a moderating role.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the framework of Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB), this paper conducted this cross-sectional study to understand the influence of attitudes, norms and perceived behavioral control (PBC) on the intention to drink tap water from reusable bottles. Italian university students (n =540) majoring in the hard (42.4%) or the soft (57.6%) sciences completed an anonymous self-report questionnaire.

Findings

For both groups, there was a significant association between attitudes and intention to use a refillable water bottle. The intention to drink tap water was also influenced by PBC among the hard science students, whereas among the soft science students the descriptive norm exerted a significant influence.

Originality/value

This is the first application of TPB, a well-established theoretical and methodological framework, to understand the intention of university students to drink tap water from reusable bottles. Within the framework of TPB, this study is the first to address this specific pro-environmental behavior and explore the potential moderating role of university studies programs, which proved significant.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Han Sub Kwak, Misook Kim and Yoonhwa Jeong

The purpose of this paper is to compare the acceptance ratings and drivers of liking and disliking attributes of aseptic-packaged cooked rice by consumers, researchers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the acceptance ratings and drivers of liking and disliking attributes of aseptic-packaged cooked rice by consumers, researchers and experts.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive analysis (DA) was conducted using trained panelists. Acceptability was measured by consumers, researchers and experts. The results of DA and acceptability were analyzed using partial least square regression.

Findings

There was no strong relationship among the three groups in their rating patterns for the samples (r=−0.342-0.445). The liking factors for each group were as follows: consumers (rice cake flavor and moisture), researchers (wet wood flavor and whiteness) and experts (wet wood flavor and size of rice). The disliking factors for each group were as follows: consumers (wet wood flavor and brown particle), researchers (moisture) and experts (old rice aroma). The consumers, researchers and experts seemed to have different acceptances and key descriptive attributes for aseptic-packaged cooked rice.

Research limitations/implications

The consensus by researchers during the product development process required caution with regard to the fact that the evaluation by the researchers could be different from what consumers or experts prefer.

Practical implications

Setting-up in-house panelists group would be minimized the discrepancy between consumers and researches.

Originality/value

This study contributes to understanding of the acceptability by food researchers and comparing to consumers and experts for the first time in sensory field.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1907

From what was said in the previous article on this subject, it is obvious that a new profession has arisen in consequence of the passing of the Food and Drugs Acts, and of…

Abstract

From what was said in the previous article on this subject, it is obvious that a new profession has arisen in consequence of the passing of the Food and Drugs Acts, and of the fact that their execution is now compulsory on all the local authorities legally concerned with the matter. This profession, under the fostering influence of certain scientific and academic bodies, now includes a considerable number of individuals who, in their general culture and education, as well as in their special scientific qualifications, are at least on a par with the members of the older so‐called “learned” professions. In the course of the early development of the analytical profession, as a body, the old Society of Public Analysts was a most potent influence for good, and did, and still does under another but unfortunate name, very excellent work in collecting and publishing any additions that are made to our scientific knowledge of matters connected with the analysis and adulteration of food by the scattered workers in this country and abroad.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Salvatore G. Fiore and Shaun Kelly

To examine some of the issues surrounding the integration of auditory features at online stores with reference to social and experiential implications of implementing…

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Abstract

Purpose

To examine some of the issues surrounding the integration of auditory features at online stores with reference to social and experiential implications of implementing auditory atmospherics, product presentation techniques and other features to the online context.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 70 online retail, manufacturer and representational web sites are surveyed recording and categorising their use of sound. Discussion is developed on projected directions for the use of sound online, adopting examples like product demonstrations to highlight conceptual and practical differences.

Findings

Of the small number of web sites using sound, most are large corporations who employ audio features to enhance the display of products and within multimedia features. Sound is not used consistently for all products on offer or all parts of the store. Discussion centres on potential impact of auditory technologies for social and experiential aspects of shopping online and on how sound may better be used to overcome physical barriers between shoppers, products and the retail environment and to increase the potential for more fulfilling shopping and consuming experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Research is needed to explore consumer perceptions of auditory features and their impact on experience. In particular, the effectiveness of using sound to enhance the presentation of product features online in a personally relevant way to shoppers should be examined.

Practical implications

There is immense scope for improvement in the use of sound in online stores to present products and provide atmospherics. Retailers should treat the online store interface as a tangible point of interaction rather than inferior replication of bricks and mortar stores and focus on implementing features which encourage communication about products and increasing richness of the media employed to represent product attributes.

Originality/value

There has been little research considering the role of sound in enhancing online shopping experiences, with most developments centring on visual aspects of the online store interface. This work provides a cross‐disciplinary basis to guide initial developments in the integration of auditory features in online stores with regard to potential social and experiential implications for users.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Strategic Marketing Management in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-745-8

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Case study
Publication date: 31 March 2015

Anand Kumar Jaiswal, Harit Palan and Ingita Jain

Launched in 2005, Aava natural mineral water is one of the key brands in the natural mineral water market in India. It had sales of over Rs. 15 crore (150 million) in 2012…

Abstract

Launched in 2005, Aava natural mineral water is one of the key brands in the natural mineral water market in India. It had sales of over Rs. 15 crore (150 million) in 2012 and it is the second largest brand and a volume leader in the natural mineral water category. The case discusses the dilemma faced by its Managing Director and his team in light of the emerging competition. The company needs to take important decisions related to customer segment selection, product mix and introduction of new product offerings.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Katja Mikhailovich and Robert Fitzgerald

This paper aimed to examine the impact of the removal of bottled water on the campus community. This paper presents the findings of a survey conducted at the first…

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2111

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to examine the impact of the removal of bottled water on the campus community. This paper presents the findings of a survey conducted at the first Australian university to remove single-use bottled water from sale on a small regional university campus. The removal of bottled water from sale at the university formed part of the university’s commitment to environmental sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted substantially by undergraduate students who participated in an action learning project in which they assisted in the design, implementation and analysis of an online snapshot survey made available to all staff and students of the university.

Findings

The results indicated some evidence of changes to pro-environmental behaviors such as increased use of re-fillable bottles, but there were less desirable outcomes such as drinking less water. Community perceptions were dramatically polarized. Restrictions on freedom of choice, concerns about health as a result of increased use of high-sugar drinks and the continued availability of other plastic drink bottles were provided as strong objections to the removal of bottled water from sale on campus.

Practical implications

The study provides useful insights for university sustainability planners and administrators about the complex range of issues associated with the implementation of sustainability initiatives on a university campus.

Originality/value

While extensive literature exists about the environmental impacts of bottled water, few studies have explored the impacts or community responses to the removal of bottled water in the university context.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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